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NEWS
April 30, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sounds of Brazil drifted from one shop to the next in downtown Los Angeles' fashion district--Brazil with a distinctly Korean twist. In Amber Clothing Co., his new manufacturing and wholesaling shop, Alberto Chi chewed on Korean rice cakes while talking to his younger brother in Portuguese--the language of their native Sao Paulo in Brazil. He picked up the phone and spoke in Korean, then switched to English as he thumbed through samples with a textile salesman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the riot, Mee Cho, a merchant at the Alameda Swap Meet, had stocked up on jewelry and pocketbooks in anticipation of a brisk Mother's Day business. But her forethought only heightened her loss. When vandals looted the swap meet south of downtown 10 days ago, Cho lost $15,000 in merchandise. On Saturday, she braced for what she believes will soon happen--the day the thieves tote the goods back and try to sell them to her.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | ROGER VINCENT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wilshire Boulevard, the storied spine of Los Angeles, will boast a new landmark this week when a plush $35-million spa, mall and golf complex catering to the city's affluent Korean population opens just east of Western Avenue. Aroma Wilshire Center is believed to be the first entertainment project of its kind in the nation. It was inspired by popular high-rise fitness centers in Asia, where urban businesspeople often line up to get in after work.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Facing an unfamiliar and sometimes unbending banking system in the United States, thousands of Korean immigrants rely on an ancient Asian lending practice known as a kye to finance their prospering small businesses in Los Angeles and other cities. In a kye , a group of a dozen or more friends or associates get together monthly and each contributes the same amount, usually ranging from $100 to $50,000, to a common pot.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second sale of a Southland hotel to Korean investors in less than a week, Seoul-based Koreana Hotel Co. has purchased the Hyatt Wilshire Hotel for about $25 million in cash, according to sources close to the deal. The purchase of the 396-room hotel from Hyatt Corp. came after Korean-born investor Charles Lee paid $18.1 million at an auction last Thursday for the 150-room Doubletree Resort in Cathedral City near Palm Springs.
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the zeal of an evangelist and humor of a comic, Byung Sik Hong travels around Los Angeles and Orange counties urging Korean immigrants to put on a happy face and smile. "Practice smiling every chance you get," advises Hong, a Korean American management expert and volunteer cultural sensitivity trainer. "Even if you speak broken English, you can still convey friendliness with a smile, a firm handshake or a pat on the back."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As soon as word got out that Hyun Sook Lee, an immigrant from Korea, had lost her husband, son and home in the Northridge earthquake, the Los Angeles community of Korean immigrants and their American-born descendants swung into action. * Within days, the 42-year-old Northridge resident had played host to a steady stream of visitors, including the Korean consul general and envoys from several charities. Community members donated thousands of dollars to Lee and her surviving son, Jason.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was approaching midnight at St. Agnes Korean Catholic Church south of Koreatown, and a group of lay leaders were about to adjourn a workshop when three young men brandishing guns burst in and shouted: "Hands up and don't move!" The robbers shot Moon-Kyung Park in the right arm and took wallets, watches, wedding rings, cellular phones and beepers from 22 men, who had come from as far away as San Diego to attend the training seminar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1988 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Seon Hong Kim, who moved from Korea to the United States nine years ago, is a manager at the Hanmi Bank in Koreatown, where most of the employees and customers are Korean. Kim, who lives in West Hills, said the bank is starting a sort of affirmative-action program of its own: hiring non-Koreans. "We want to reach out," he said. Reaching out was the point Saturday at a conference at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the columns of black smoke that rose from Los Angeles during three days of rioting, some of the city's most powerful symbols of racial tension and community disenfranchisement disappeared from the landscape they once dominated. For decades, the cramped and faded liquor stores of South Los Angeles were a flash point of conflict over issues that have drawn, in many ways, from the same well of emotions that overflowed in the days of rioting.
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