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Koreatown Los Angeles

NEWS
December 1, 1996 | ANGIE CHUANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Rhee, a 38-year-old Koreatown resident, reluctantly recalls April 30, 1992: the first desperate day he ever handled and fired a gun as he defended himself from looters who shot at him and the electronics store he worked at. Things are different now. The soft-spoken, bearded man and about 20 other residents and business owners help protect the rebuilt community quietly, unarmed and with the cooperation of the police.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG
It's midmorning in the city, and an old Korean love song is blaring out of Kim's rice mill--a white, one-story building on Olympic Boulevard. Inside, the pungent smell of fermenting soy beans and hot pepper stings your nostrils, and grinding machines going full blast assault your ears as another busy day is in full swing at the Koreatown landmark. The building also serves as a rice cake factory, and it's a gathering place for lonely old men and women as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bong Hwan Kim was hired as director of the Korean Youth Center four years ago, housing development was not part of his job description. The center's gang prevention, family counseling and athletic programs occupied his time. But gradually, center officials began to look for ways to ease overcrowded living conditions in Koreatown--home to more than 60,000 people, many of them Latino and Korean immigrants crammed together in aging apartment buildings.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a leaden sky, about 2,000 people gathered Saturday in the heart of Koreatown to appeal for racial harmony and vent anger at government officials who failed to quell the deadly Los Angeles riots. The boisterous demonstrators, who broke often into cheers and chants, were silenced only when they bowed their heads in prayer for Edward Song Lee, an 18-year-old college freshman who was shot and killed when he tried to protect a merchant from looters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2004 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
It is Sunday morning at Immanuel Presbyterian Church on Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles' Koreatown, and its diverse congregation is singing "From All Four of Earth's Faraway Corners." With gusto, they sing -- the first stanza in Spanish, the second verse in English. And, back and forth until they complete the entire song in two languages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Silence on Tuesday morning replaced the laughter of children usually heard at the Gloria Montejano School in Koreatown. Instead, parents and teachers toured in sadness and disbelief what was left of the classrooms that were damaged in a fire that investigators believe was arson. The school, which provides care for 72 children ages 2 to 5, is a vital resource for many working parents in the neighborhood, said Director Sonia Reyes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2010 | By Victoria Kim
In the early hours of New Year's Eve 2006, 9-year-old Henry Cruz lay still under the covers in his family's one-bedroom Koreatown apartment. In the next room, he heard sounds of a struggle, screams and then gunshots. Peering out from under the edge of the blanket, the boy saw a man dressed in black walk into the bedroom, open a drawer and grab his father's wallet before taking off. On Wednesday, that man, Matthew Ian Koontz, and an accomplice, Jonathan Blackwell, were found guilty of first-degree murder in the deaths of Henry's father and sister, and the attempted murder of his mother, who was shot in the stomach but survived.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2001 | SAM QUINONES, Sam Quinones is a writer based in Mexico City. He is the author of "True Tales From Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, the Popsicle Kings, Chalino and the Bronx" (University of New Mexico Press, 2001)
About Los Angeles, John Gregory Dunne once wrote: "There is no past. The absence of past and structure is basic to the allure of Los Angeles." But to this city come immigrants laden with the past. They are escaping it while yearning for it. Or, at least they yearn for a version of the past that is fairer than the one they left. Those desires are etched onto Los Angeles' tabula rasa. So the city today has not one past. It has many.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2006 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
The evening of July 14 was to have been a joyous one for Brian Chin, 27, and his buddies. Chin had become a new father nine days earlier, and they had met in a Koreatown bar to celebrate. But, within hours, the celebration turned into a nightmare. Chin was stabbed to death in the parking lot of trendy Chapman Plaza, at Alexandria Avenue and 6th Street, shortly before 2 a.m. on July 15.
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | ROSE KIM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Marcia Choo became director of the Asian Pacific American Dispute Resolution Center two years ago, she thought she would be raising money and winning support for the small organization that helps people resolve conflicts--landlord-tenant disputes, delinquent bills--outside of court.
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