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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1999
Re Kosovo: History certainly repeats itself. Here the world sits on its hands again. Unbelievable. JOHN GILLMARTIN Chino
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WORLD
June 18, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
It was the four-month anniversary of the popular uprising against the Libyan regime, but the throngs converging Friday on Tripoli's Green Square came to praise Moammar Kadafi, not to bury him. Hundreds of celebratory gunshots crackled and triumphant posters of Kadafi were hoisted aloft in front of the ancient stone walls of the capital's downtown market. Several thousand buoyant Kadafi supporters — including entire families and young men and women in civilian clothes toting semiautomatic weapons — took part in a closely choreographed pep rally for their leader.
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WORLD
July 22, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Kosovo's declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 did not violate international law, the United Nations' highest court declared Thursday in a closely watched case that could have significant repercussions for secessionist movements around the world. The opinion by the International Court of Justice, while not binding, is likely to give a big boost to the tiny Balkan country's quest for full statehood and represents a blow to Serbia, which considers Kosovo part of its territory.
HEALTH
May 8, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Do we feel better now that U.S. forces have captured and killed Osama bin Laden? The pictures and video of spontaneous celebrations across the nation, of baseball fans chanting "U.S.A., U.S.A.," of bagpipes and fist pumps at the former World Trade Center site: All declare the answer an unqualified yes. But researchers who probe the vengeful mind suggest that for some, Bin Laden's demise will reopen psychic wounds, lay bare persistent mental health...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2000
Re "Soldiers Use Tear Gas to Avert Kosovo Clash," Feb. 22: How can it be that NATO troops are now preventing ethnic Albanians from traveling freely in Kosovo? Wasn't that the reason we went into Kosovo in the first place, to halt Serb-sponsored genocide and apartheid? Instead, I now see NATO troops in effect doing the bidding of war criminal Slobodan Milosevic by ratifying the ethnic partition of Kosovo and protecting jeering crowds of Serbs, the same Serbs who not only formed the core of Milosevic's support in Kosovo but who also attacked American GIs in Mitrovica (Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999
In "A Shaken Alliance Reassesses Some of Its Objectives" (April 25), Tyler Marshall indicates that NATO has gotten itself into a mess in the Balkans and is looking to Russia as the key to a diplomatic solution. Why not a cease-fire until this is explored? SOL LONDE Northridge Thank you for your powerful picture and articles about families brutally driven from the pastoral Kosovo village of Belanica (April 25). It is painful to see the personal face of genocide. Yet I do want to know when villages are being destroyed, even though I am not sure what to do about it. There were no cameras to shock people of conscience in 1838 when American soldiers brutally tore Cherokee families from their farms and villages in the southeast and marched them through the winter snows to Oklahoma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1999
Thank you, Alexander Cockburn, for some rare clarity on the tragedy in Kosovo ("Hawk Still Rules White House," Commentary, April 8). What is happening there is not "genocide" or a "holocaust" but typical, albeit horrific, civil war brutality. Even the killing of 2,000 Albanians is insufficient grounds for superpowers to destroy Yugoslavia, a sovereign and legitimate nation. We are not fighting there for humanitarian or other tangible reasons, but to rescue NATO's (read Bill Clinton's and Madeleine Albright's)
WORLD
March 3, 2011 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
Two United States airmen were killed and another two injured Wednesday when a lone gunman opened fire on an American military bus outside a terminal at the international airport in Frankfurt, Germany. A 21-year-old suspect from Kosovo was arrested in a terminal building while trying to escape, according to local police. Authorities said they were investigating whether the man was part of a terrorist plot. The four were U.S. military personnel stationed at the Royal Air Force base at Lakenheath in Britain and had just arrived in Germany en route to an unspecified overseas deployment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2010 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
Army Sgt. Michael David P. Cardenaz was a larger-than-life figure, those who knew him say. A bald, bull of a guy, Cardenaz told a Colorado reporter in 2009 that he was an "old-school" soldier. By then, he said, he had twice been hit by shrapnel, and had survived what he described as dozens of close calls with improvised explosive devices and rocket-propelled grenades. And a fellow soldier had died in his arms, he said. Cardenaz was awarded numerous medals and commendations for his military service, including a Bronze Star.
WORLD
July 22, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Kosovo's declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 did not violate international law, the United Nations' highest court declared Thursday in a closely watched case that could have significant repercussions for secessionist movements around the world. The opinion by the International Court of Justice, while not binding, is likely to give a big boost to the tiny Balkan country's quest for full statehood and represents a blow to Serbia, which considers Kosovo part of its territory.
WORLD
November 2, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Kosovo's Albanian majority unveiled a statue of former President Clinton to thank him for saving them by stopping a wave of attacks by Serbian forces on ethnic Albanians a decade ago. Clinton, who attended the unveiling, launched NATO airstrikes in 1999 to halt the killing of ethnic Albanians by Serbian troops in Kosovo, then a province of Serbia. Kosovo declared its independence last year. Clinton's speech was interrupted several times by Kosovo Albanians cheering his name and "U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2009 | Michael Harris
Foreign correspondent Jay Morgan isn't yet 40, but he is burned out by war. He lost his wife, a combat photographer, to a bullet in Beirut. By the late 1990s, he is in Kosovo, where Serb paramilitaries are skirmishing with Albanian-ethnic rebels. When the atrocity level gets too high -- and Jay is able to predict which atrocities will make Page One and which won't disturb the American public's slumber -- NATO will intervene with bombs and cruise missiles.
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