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Kpfk Radio Station

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1996
A radio news reporter for KPFK-FM in Studio City was shot to death execution-style in South-Central Los Angeles, Los Angeles Police Department homicide detectives said Monday. The body of Michael Taylor, 45, of Los Angeles was found last Tuesday in a vacant lot off South Victoria Avenue, said Detective Alex Moreno of the LAPD South bureau. Residents heard gun shots near the railroad tracks about 1:30 a.m. and called police, he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1995 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After seven years on the air, the internationally syndicated gay newsmagazine "This Way Out" may broadcast its last show at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday on KPFK-FM (90.7). The locally produced public-radio program, with an estimated 250,000 listeners on 85 stations, has run out of money.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1995 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KPFK-FM (90.7), which recently underwent a management overhaul, will unveil a new weekday schedule Wednesday that is intended to provide listeners with a clearer and more consistent program lineup. Executives at the listener-sponsored station hope the schedule--made up of Monday-through-Friday "strips" of thematically connected shows--will attract a wider audience and win back listeners who had abandoned KPFK because of its "hodgepodge" scheduling, said newly named program director Gwen Walters.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1995 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In person, Mario Casetta comes across much as he does on his radio show. The personable 74-year-old host of two weekly international music programs on KPFK-FM (90.7) conveys the becalmed spirit and folksy wisdom of a man who's lived a rich and adventurous life. Yet mention the possibility of retirement to Casetta and this usually laid-back soul with the raspy, languid voice turns momentarily feisty. "I will be doing the radio show until I drop dead and they pull me out by the heels!"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1995 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top executives at public-radio station KPFK-FM (90.7) were forced out Wednesday for what were described as management shortcomings, including failing to improve its multicultural programming. General Manager Clifford Roberts and program director Lucia Chappelle were asked to leave the station by Patricia Scott, acting executive director of the Berkeley-based Pacifica Foundation, which owns the station.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public-radio station KPFK-FM (90.7) has axed two weekly programs dealing with African American issues that had been accused by several organizations of broadcasting hate speech. Dropped from KPFK's lineup this week were "Family Tree," hosted by Jan Robinson Flint, and "Freedom Now," hosted by Marcus Lewis and Ken Carr.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1993 | ANTHONY NEWMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first time listeners hear Mara Zhelutka's show "Music of the Spheres" or Mira Bai's "Divine Songs," they're often not even aware that they're listening to the radio at all. Instead, they're in that blissful, early-morning state between sleep and wakefulness, when it's too early to get up but too late to fall back into deep sleep. Dimly, they hear that delicate, ethereal music . . . songs drifting, commercial-free, one into another . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which last year drew congressional ire for allegedly funding a public-TV show on gay life, is under fire by one of its own directors--this time for supporting a Los Angeles radio station that he says has aired racist and anti-Semitic programs. Vic Gold, a Washington author who serves on the nine-member CPB board, said he wants the powerful corporation to withdraw about $175,000 in annual financial support it gives Los Angeles' KPFK-FM (90.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of a charge that it broadcast an anti-Semitic program, KPFK-FM (90.7) is scrambling to smooth over the controversy by planning future programs on multiculturalism and holding a meeting with Los Angeles County human relations officials. In the meantime, management at the non-commercial station has warned staffers not to discuss the issue on the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
KPFK-FM (90.7) can't do much to break through what it calls the Pentagon's control of information about the war with Iraq, so instead it has decided to cover peace. "We are an alternative voice," said Alan Fong, KPFK's general manager. "We are not able to be in Riyadh or Amman or Baghdad except through stringers, so we choose certain subjects like peace as a way of informing people about things that they might not be able to find elsewhere."
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