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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to the Times
A poet and performer with only a year's experience in radio, Jerry Quickley might seem an unlikely candidate for war correspondent. But the host on the left-leaning KPFK-FM (90.7) said he went to Iraq -- until deported on the second day of the conflict -- to cover what he called the most significant news story since the Vietnam War. Quickley, a garrulous bear of a man heard on "Beneath the Surface," a news analysis show that airs weekdays from 5 to 6 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2002
STEVE Carney's Oct. 18 article, "Brokering peace at KPFK," misses the point regarding staff concerns about KPFK-FM. He accurately encapsulates what the station should be about: "radio by collective -- with listeners and volunteers joining staff in programming and management decisions," but the new general manager's approach contradicts that. In spite of the years of struggle to prevent a takeover of Pacifica by corporate-style forces, Pacifica is operating like a corporation. Just the simple fact that there is a general manager with ultimate authority puts the decision making for an entire station in the hands of one person and their flaws, regardless of who that person is. Sonali Kolhatkar North Hollywood Kolhatkar is host and co-producer of KPFK's "The Morning Show"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2002 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Radio by collective -- with listeners and volunteers joining staff in programming and management decisions -- may seem a ludicrous notion in this era of corporate, consultant-driven radio, with playlists tighter than 'N Sync's choreography. But it's seen as a birthright at KPFK-FM (90.7), the Los Angeles outlet of the left-leaning Pacifica radio network.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As bitter as it got, it must seem like a mere playground spat--the infighting and turmoil that beset the left-leaning Pacifica radio network and its Los Angeles outlet over the past several years. The station's new general manager is used to dealing with more than pickets, angry phone calls and spam.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2002 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 17 months in "exile," Roz and Howard Larman are finally returning home Sunday night. Home in this case is public radio station KPFK-FM (90.7), where the husband-and-wife radio team hosted a folk- and roots-oriented music program for more than 30 years. During their long tenure, the Larmans became an institution in the local folk underground as they helped expose music and artists usually ignored by commercial radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In their family brawl over control of the left-leaning Pacifica radio network, the combatants have finally crashed through the looking glass, landing in a parallel world that reverses everything they knew before. A week ago at the Los Angeles outlet of the five-station network, KPFK-FM (90.7), general manager Mark Schubb was placed on administrative leave and told not to return.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2000
It bothers me that the FCC would grant XLNC1 the 90.7 spot emanating from Tijuana, knowing it would interrupt a large body of listeners' ability to hear KPFK-FM (Around the Dial, by Susan Carpenter, Aug. 25). KPFK's offerings are progressive, whether it be musical, political or spiritual. It was the only station I could find that covered the shadow conventions. I've nothing against XLNC1. I'd like them both to thrive on my dial, but far enough apart in megahertz that we all have the freedom to listen to what we choose, and thereby be heard.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 40 demonstrators carried placards and chanted slogans in front of public radio station KPFK-FM (90.7) for two hours late Monday afternoon, protesting what they characterized as KPFK's censorship, as well as statements by Marc Cooper, a major on-air personality, about Mumia Abu-Jamal, who is on death row in Pennsylvania for the slaying of a policeman in 1981. "Free press, free speech, free Mumia" was a frequent chant, as protesters reacted to a Jan.
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