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Kristina Ripatti

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2006 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Officer Kristina Ripatti didn't hear the gunfire that changed her life. She didn't feel the bullet that plunged through her chest, nicked a rib, tore through a lung and severed her spine. And she never saw the gun in the suspect's hand -- the part that bothers her most, she said. Ten years of reflexively watching people's hands for weapons, and she didn't see it. There was only an odor -- a sudden, overpowering gunpowder smell bursting into her nostrils.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2010 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
"Arms. Arms are good." Tim Pearce seized hold of the thought. He was in a cramped hospital waiting area shortly before midnight on a Saturday in June 2006. His wife, Kristina Ripatti, like him a Los Angeles Police Department officer, had been shot three times. At first, nobody expected her to make it. Then doctors brought news that was both heartening and devastating. Ripatti would survive, but her spinal cord had been severed. She would be paralyzed from the chest down.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2006 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
HOUSE No. 85 has just come tumbling down, and the popular, hyper host of "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," Ty Pennington, makes a surprising confession about his feelings toward his job: "I don't really know how to explain this thing because the worst part of what we do is a television show." ABC's Emmy-winning series ranks 15th among most-watched shows and places 11th among the advertiser-coveted 18-to-49-year-olds. So why does Pennington lament his livelihood?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2006 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
HOUSE No. 85 has just come tumbling down, and the popular, hyper host of "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," Ty Pennington, makes a surprising confession about his feelings toward his job: "I don't really know how to explain this thing because the worst part of what we do is a television show." ABC's Emmy-winning series ranks 15th among most-watched shows and places 11th among the advertiser-coveted 18-to-49-year-olds. So why does Pennington lament his livelihood?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Kristina Ripatti and Tim Pearce joined the Los Angeles Police Department a decade ago, fell in love on the job, married, and went on to become patrol officers in adjacent South Bureau divisions. On Sunday, Pearce was at his wife's side in a downtown hospital room where she was listed in serious but stable condition after being shot in the chest by a robbery suspect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2010 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
"Arms. Arms are good." Tim Pearce seized hold of the thought. He was in a cramped hospital waiting area shortly before midnight on a Saturday in June 2006. His wife, Kristina Ripatti, like him a Los Angeles Police Department officer, had been shot three times. At first, nobody expected her to make it. Then doctors brought news that was both heartening and devastating. Ripatti would survive, but her spinal cord had been severed. She would be paralyzed from the chest down.
OPINION
June 16, 2006
Re "A Good Officer Carries On," June 14 My heart goes out Los Angeles Police Officer Kristina Ripatti and her husband, Officer Tim Pearce, for what they must be going through as they face this tragedy. Actor Christopher Reeve once said: "I think a hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles." Ripatti is a hero in the truest sense of the word. SY HUSSAINI Anaheim Hills
OPINION
June 7, 2006
Re "Officer Shot by Gunman Is Stable," June 5 The Times reported that Los Angeles Police Officer Kristina Ripatti was shot by a suspect who is a career criminal and whose crimes include murder and armed robbery. The Times should investigate just how a murderer was ever let out of prison. Precisely who let this guy out and why? Why is it that we are incarcerating minor drug users while letting a killer free to roam the streets? What are we thinking? DAVID HILL Murrieta, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
Police shot and wounded an alleged gang member after he pulled a gun during a foot chase in South Los Angeles, a Los Angeles Police Department spokesman said Saturday. Two gang-enforcement officers approached a group of people who appeared to be gang members when one of them ran away near 108th Street and Avalon Boulevard, said LAPD spokesman Mike Lopez. The officers saw the suspect pull a gun from his waistband, jump a fence into an apartment courtyard and turn toward police, he said.
NEWS
October 16, 2010
Over the summer, Kristina Ripatti-Pearce completed Race Across America, a bicycle relay from Oceanside, Calif., to Annapolis, Md. It's considered one of the most difficult races in the world. But unlike her team members, Ripatti-Pearce faced an added challenge -- the young mother of two is paralyzed from the chest down. A former officer for the Los Angeles Police Department, Ripatti-Pearce was on a routine patrol in 2006 when she noticed a suspicious-looking man walking the streets in South L.A. After chasing him for blocks and then jumping on his back, the suspect turned and shot Ripatti-Pearce at point-blank range.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2006 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Officer Kristina Ripatti didn't hear the gunfire that changed her life. She didn't feel the bullet that plunged through her chest, nicked a rib, tore through a lung and severed her spine. And she never saw the gun in the suspect's hand -- the part that bothers her most, she said. Ten years of reflexively watching people's hands for weapons, and she didn't see it. There was only an odor -- a sudden, overpowering gunpowder smell bursting into her nostrils.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Kristina Ripatti and Tim Pearce joined the Los Angeles Police Department a decade ago, fell in love on the job, married, and went on to become patrol officers in adjacent South Bureau divisions. On Sunday, Pearce was at his wife's side in a downtown hospital room where she was listed in serious but stable condition after being shot in the chest by a robbery suspect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2007 | Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
A man who was handcuffed by police during an early morning arrest Monday in the Westlake district of Los Angeles managed to reach for a gun hidden in his pants and opened fire, seriously wounding a veteran officer, according to several LAPD sources familiar with the investigation. Rampart Division training officer Andy Taylor, 37, was rushed by ambulance to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was treated for a gunshot wound to the shoulder and chest.
SPORTS
April 7, 2008 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
Anyone familiar with the charity juggernaut that is "Swim With Mike," the annual USC fund-raiser that provides scholarships for physically challenged former athletes, knows that it was born of friendship and brotherhood. Ron Orr, a USC athletic administrator and former Trojans swimmer, launched the swim-a-thon in 1981 after former teammate Mike Nyeholt was paralyzed from the chest down in a dirt-bike accident. Both men grew up in San Gabriel.
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