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BUSINESS
March 12, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Kroger Co.'s quarterly profit tumbled 16% and its sales rose a slim 2% as it battled rising costs and tougher grocery competition. The fiscal fourth-quarter results Tuesday still beat Wall Street estimates, but the 2008 forecast from the nation's largest traditional grocery store chain fell short of analysts' expectations. Cincinnati-based Kroger, operator of Ralphs and Food 4 Less, said it earned $322.9 million, or 48 cents a share, for the quarter ended Feb. 2, down from $384.
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BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Albertsons is making a play for the top spot in the U.S. grocery industry with the purchase of rival Safeway for more than $9 billion in cash and stock. Safeway, now the second-largest chain behind Kroger Co., owns the Vons and Pavilions brands in Southern California. With the purchase, Albertsons would operate more than 2,400 stores, compared with Kroger's 2,640. The companies said no stores would be closed as part of the transaction, although executives said that the Federal Trade Commission could require divestitures.
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BUSINESS
September 21, 1988 | Associated Press
The prospect of a bidding war for Kroger Co. loomed Tuesday as the investment firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. offered $4.6 billion for the supermarket operator, topping an offer from Dart Group Corp. made the day before. Kohlberg Kravis--which earlier this year outbid Dart for Stop & Shop Cos.--offered to pay $58.50 a share for each of Kroger's 78.6 million outstanding shares, or a total of $4.6 billion.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
LIVINGSTON, Calif. - With his company's poultry sales plunging after a salmonella outbreak that has sickened hundreds of consumers, the head of Foster Farms has apologized for the biggest food safety lapse in the family firm's history. The Merced County producer was thrust into the national spotlight this month when chicken from its three Central California plants was found to be contaminated with a particularly virulent strain of salmonella that has proved resistant to antibiotics.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks, Times Staff Writer
Federal utility regulators have ordered hearings into whether energy suppliers overcharged the city of Burbank and the Kroger Co. supermarket operator for long-term electricity contracts signed during the energy crisis. But first, Burbank and Kroger must hold settlement talks with the power sellers, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said in an order issued Monday. Burbank's complaint seeks to lower the price of contracts signed with subsidiaries of Calpine Corp.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
What happens to the 40% of food produced but never eaten in the U.S. each year, the mounds of perfect fruit passed over by grocery store shoppers, the tons of meat and milk left to expire? At Ralphs, one of the oldest and largest supermarket chains on the West Coast, it helps keep the power on. In a sprawling Compton distribution center that the company shares with its fellow Kroger Co. subsidiary Food 4 Less, organic matter otherwise destined for a landfill is rerouted instead into the facility's energy grid.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Albertsons is making a play for the top spot in the U.S. grocery industry with the purchase of rival Safeway for more than $9 billion in cash and stock. Safeway, now the second-largest chain behind Kroger Co., owns the Vons and Pavilions brands in Southern California. With the purchase, Albertsons would operate more than 2,400 stores, compared with Kroger's 2,640. The companies said no stores would be closed as part of the transaction, although executives said that the Federal Trade Commission could require divestitures.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2000
* Kroger Co. said its fiscal third-quarter earnings rose 15% to $233 million, or 28 cents a share, matching forecasts. The nation's largest supermarket operator said sales rose 6% to $10.96 billion, led by its higher-margin store-brand products. Sales at stores open at least a year rose a slight 1.9%.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2002
* Shares of Big 5 Sporting Goods Corp., the El Segundo-based operator of 250 stores selling athletic apparel and equipment, rose slightly in their debut on Nasdaq. The stock (ticker symbol: BGFV) closed at $13.17. The company late Monday sold 8.05 million shares at $13 each. The initial public offering price had been cut from an original range of $14 to $16. * Kroger Co. said fiscal first-quarter profit increased 19% as the largest U.S.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By David Pierson
With 300 people already sickened by a salmonella outbreak in Foster Farms chicken, consumers are being reminded to take extra precautions when handling raw poultry. High on that list is something counterintuitive: Don't wash raw chicken in the sink. Researchers say all that splashing can send bacteria soaring up to 3 feet away, onto your countertops, towels and dish racks. That increases the chance of it landing on other foods or on your hands. Here's what the U.S. Department of Agriculture has to say: "Some consumers think they are removing bacteria and making their meat or poultry safe.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By David Pierson
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is threatening to close three California poultry plants operated by Foster Farms blamed for an outbreak of salmonella poisoning that has sickened at least 278 people nationwide. In a letter sent Monday to Foster Farms, the USDA said sanitary conditions at the facilities were so poor that they posed a "serious ongoing threat to public health. " The agency has ordered Foster Farms, one of the nation's largest privately owned poultry producers, to develop a plan by Thursday to clean up the plants.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
As supermarkets try to figure out how to cut down on waste and experiment with alternative forms of energy,  Kroger Co. says it's doing both simultaneously by turning landfill-bound organic matter into electricity that powers its stores, The Times' Tiffany Hsu reports . An August report from the Natural Resources Defense Council found that 40% of food in the U.S. goes uneaten. When that 20 pounds of food per person per month ends up in landfills, it contributes to 25% of the country's methane emissions.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
What happens to the 40% of food produced but never eaten in the U.S. each year, the mounds of perfect fruit passed over by grocery store shoppers, the tons of meat and milk left to expire? At Ralphs, one of the oldest and largest supermarket chains on the West Coast, it helps keep the power on. In a sprawling Compton distribution center that the company shares with its fellow Kroger Co. subsidiary Food 4 Less, organic matter otherwise destined for a landfill is rerouted instead into the facility's energy grid.
AUTOS
April 9, 2013 | By Shan Li and Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
To your grocery list, add electricity. Kroger Co., the country's largest grocery store owner, with chains including Ralphs and Food 4 Less, plans to install a total of 225 vehicle charging stations at 125 supermarkets in California and Arizona. San Francisco-based Ecotality Inc., which operates the nation's second-largest network of public electric charging stations for vehicles, announced Monday that it would handle the installation. Kroger, based in Cincinnati, said it would invest about $1.5 million to install Ecotality's Blink charging stations and DC Fast Chargers.
AUTOS
April 8, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
San Francisco-based Ecotality Inc., which operates the nation's second-largest network of public electric charging stations for vehicles, announced today that it plans to install 225 new chargers at Kroger Co. stores in California and Arizona. Kroger is the country's largest grocery chain, and includes Ralphs and Food 4 Less. It will invest about $1.5 million to install Ecotality's Blink charging stations and DC Fast Chargers. The installations in California will be made in Los Angeles and San Diego.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vons Cos. Joins Lawsuit Against Drug Firms: The Arcadia-based company and three other major grocery chain operators have filed suit in Cincinnati federal court, charging 16 large pharmaceutical firms with discriminatory pricing. The suit--a joint filing that also includes Oakland-based Safeway Inc., Boise, Ida.-based Albertson's Inc. and Cincinnati-based Kroger Co.--said the drug manufacturers engage in two-tier discriminatory pricing.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2008 | The Associated Press
An executive of the Kroger Co. supermarket chain and three former managers with its Southern California subsidiary Ralphs pleaded not guilty Monday to federal labor fraud charges linked to the 2003-04 supermarket strike and lockout. A 23-count indictment filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles accuses the defendants of conspiring to rehire locked-out workers using fake Social Security numbers and identification during the strike. A trial date of Dec.
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