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Ktla Morning News Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Look out Bryant Gumbel, Charles Gibson and Paula Zahn. Here come Barbara Beck, Carlos Amezcua and live helicopter shots of as many traffic snarls on the 405 and the four-level interchange as KTLA Channel 5 can squeeze into two morning hours. Beginning Monday, KTLA is taking direct aim at the three networks' morning news programs and their personalties with five people who have never been seen before on L.A. television. But in debuting the area's first 7-9 a.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2004 | Greg Braxton
Michaela Pereira will join the "KTLA Morning News" as co-anchor on Feb. 5, the station, owned by Tribune Co., parent of The Times, announced Monday. Pereira replaces Giselle Fernandez, who left last August to pursue other interests and spend time with her new husband. Pereira is from San Francisco-based TechTV, where she anchored the technology program "Tech Live" and hosted such other programs on the channel as "Big Thinkers," "Internet Tonight" and "You Made It."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2004 | Greg Braxton
Michaela Pereira will join the "KTLA Morning News" as co-anchor on Feb. 5, the station, owned by Tribune Co., parent of The Times, announced Monday. Pereira replaces Giselle Fernandez, who left last August to pursue other interests and spend time with her new husband. Pereira is from San Francisco-based TechTV, where she anchored the technology program "Tech Live" and hosted such other programs on the channel as "Big Thinkers," "Internet Tonight" and "You Made It."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By rights, "The KTLA Morning News" should have met with a swift execution. Everything was against it. It had to compete from scratch with the three formidable network news shows and their stars, among them Bryant Gumbel and Joan Lunden. It tried to do it with little more than a cast of out-of-town nobodies and a helicopter. And perhaps most fatally of all, it tried to fill two hours of morning television with nothing but straight, ultra-serious reporting about traffic, the ubiquitous L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's 7 a.m., and the battle for the hearts, minds and funnybones of Los Angeles viewers is underway. At stake are big bucks and big yuks. It was two years ago that the honking, somersaulting, fright-wigged, floppy-shoed wiseacres of "The KTLA Morning News" made their debut and almost immediately began clobbering the long-ensconced ABC, NBC and CBS morning shows in the local ratings. And now comes another two-hour news-and-comedy show, KTTV-TV Channel 11's "Good Day, L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1992 | RICK DU BROW
Two of the basic foundations of network TV--the evening and morning news--are suddenly under the gun in the key Los Angeles market. In just a few weeks on the air, KCAL Channel 9's locally oriented, nightly 6:30 newscast with Jerry Dunphy and Pat Harvey is posing a ratings threat to the evening reports of Tom Brokaw, Dan Rather and Peter Jennings in a head-on challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Ratings for KTLA Channel 5's new two-hour morning news show dropped a bit after its debut Monday, but after its first three days the station was still ahead of network rival "CBS This Morning." "The KTLA Morning News," the first local newscast designed to compete head-to-head with the networks' morning shows, averaged a 2.2 rating (or about 110,000 local households) for its first three outings, according to the A.C. Nielsen Co. That compared to a 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1993 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
KTLA Channel 5 anchorman Hal Fishman has threatened to quit his job if station management does not take steps to correct what he perceives was "a shocking and appalling slander" leveled against him on his station's own "KTLA Morning News" two weeks ago. On that program, the station's bad-boy entertainment reporter Sam Rubin joked that Fishman once "wore a skirt for a co-anchor job in Spokane" as part of a bit in which he compared Fishman to Dustin Hoffman, who dressed as a woman in "Tootsie."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It was a chance for the local show to dance. The city was still bumping and grinding to the beat of the previous day's Christopher Commission report calling for sweeping changes in the Los Angeles Police Department and for embattled Chief Daryl F. Gates to step aside. Wasn't this--the hometown story-- exactly what was supposed to distinguish KTLA's 3-day-old morning newscast from its established national counterparts on ABC, NBC and CBS? Yes. But the dancer had two left feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two new locally produced news shows staggered out of the box, while Fox gained ground on the stumbling Big Three, which finished in a dead heat for the first time ever during the just-concluded July sweeps, according to numbers released Thursday by A.C. Nielsen Co. "The KTLA Morning News," the area's first two-hour local morning newscast, was wiped out by the three network morning shows during its first four weeks on the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1993 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
KTLA Channel 5 anchorman Hal Fishman has threatened to quit his job if station management does not take steps to correct what he perceives was "a shocking and appalling slander" leveled against him on his station's own "KTLA Morning News" two weeks ago. On that program, the station's bad-boy entertainment reporter Sam Rubin joked that Fishman once "wore a skirt for a co-anchor job in Spokane" as part of a bit in which he compared Fishman to Dustin Hoffman, who dressed as a woman in "Tootsie."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's 7 a.m., and the battle for the hearts, minds and funnybones of Los Angeles viewers is underway. At stake are big bucks and big yuks. It was two years ago that the honking, somersaulting, fright-wigged, floppy-shoed wiseacres of "The KTLA Morning News" made their debut and almost immediately began clobbering the long-ensconced ABC, NBC and CBS morning shows in the local ratings. And now comes another two-hour news-and-comedy show, KTTV-TV Channel 11's "Good Day, L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1992 | RICK DU BROW
Two of the basic foundations of network TV--the evening and morning news--are suddenly under the gun in the key Los Angeles market. In just a few weeks on the air, KCAL Channel 9's locally oriented, nightly 6:30 newscast with Jerry Dunphy and Pat Harvey is posing a ratings threat to the evening reports of Tom Brokaw, Dan Rather and Peter Jennings in a head-on challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two new locally produced news shows staggered out of the box, while Fox gained ground on the stumbling Big Three, which finished in a dead heat for the first time ever during the just-concluded July sweeps, according to numbers released Thursday by A.C. Nielsen Co. "The KTLA Morning News," the area's first two-hour local morning newscast, was wiped out by the three network morning shows during its first four weeks on the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Ratings for KTLA Channel 5's new two-hour morning news show dropped a bit after its debut Monday, but after its first three days the station was still ahead of network rival "CBS This Morning." "The KTLA Morning News," the first local newscast designed to compete head-to-head with the networks' morning shows, averaged a 2.2 rating (or about 110,000 local households) for its first three outings, according to the A.C. Nielsen Co. That compared to a 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It was a chance for the local show to dance. The city was still bumping and grinding to the beat of the previous day's Christopher Commission report calling for sweeping changes in the Los Angeles Police Department and for embattled Chief Daryl F. Gates to step aside. Wasn't this--the hometown story-- exactly what was supposed to distinguish KTLA's 3-day-old morning newscast from its established national counterparts on ABC, NBC and CBS? Yes. But the dancer had two left feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By rights, "The KTLA Morning News" should have met with a swift execution. Everything was against it. It had to compete from scratch with the three formidable network news shows and their stars, among them Bryant Gumbel and Joan Lunden. It tried to do it with little more than a cast of out-of-town nobodies and a helicopter. And perhaps most fatally of all, it tried to fill two hours of morning television with nothing but straight, ultra-serious reporting about traffic, the ubiquitous L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Look out Bryant Gumbel, Charles Gibson and Paula Zahn. Here come Barbara Beck, Carlos Amezcua and live helicopter shots of as many traffic snarls on the 405 and the four-level interchange as KTLA Channel 5 can squeeze into two morning hours. Beginning Monday, KTLA is taking direct aim at the three networks' morning news programs and their personalties with five people who have never been seen before on L.A. television. But in debuting the area's first 7-9 a.m.
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