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NEWS
October 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkey's parliament issued an ultimatum to Syria, demanding that it expel Turkish Kurdish rebels from its territory or "face the consequences." Turkish leaders accuse Syria of sheltering the rebels, who carry out cross-border attacks on Turkish territory. Syria denies the accusation, and Turkey's harsh rhetoric has triggered fears of a regional conflict.
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WORLD
August 14, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The cleric had been missing for nearly a month when his family had a taste of relief: A man who identified himself as a government official approached the missing man's sons on the street and said, "You will hear happy news of your father." A few days later, state security agents took the sons to see the cleric. His thick beard, a badge of his religious devotion, had been hacked off. His body bore marks of torture -- broken teeth, badly burned skin. The cleric was dead.
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WORLD
March 18, 2004 | From Reuters
Syrian Kurds on Wednesday buried five people they said had been shot by police Tuesday as they demonstrated to commemorate ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's 1988 chemical attacks on Kurds in Iraq. A truck flying a Kurdish flag followed a vehicle bearing the body of Ibrahim Mohammed, one of the five, through the small town of Afrin in northern Syria. People lined the route to the graveyard in a nearby village along streets scarred by scorch marks from tires burned in Tuesday's protest.
WORLD
March 18, 2004 | From Reuters
Syrian Kurds on Wednesday buried five people they said had been shot by police Tuesday as they demonstrated to commemorate ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's 1988 chemical attacks on Kurds in Iraq. A truck flying a Kurdish flag followed a vehicle bearing the body of Ibrahim Mohammed, one of the five, through the small town of Afrin in northern Syria. People lined the route to the graveyard in a nearby village along streets scarred by scorch marks from tires burned in Tuesday's protest.
WORLD
August 14, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The cleric had been missing for nearly a month when his family had a taste of relief: A man who identified himself as a government official approached the missing man's sons on the street and said, "You will hear happy news of your father." A few days later, state security agents took the sons to see the cleric. His thick beard, a badge of his religious devotion, had been hacked off. His body bore marks of torture -- broken teeth, badly burned skin. The cleric was dead.
NEWS
May 11, 1987
Britain is deporting a number of Iraqi Kurds to Syria after rejecting their requests for political asylum, the British government said. London newspapers reported that a Kurdish woman and her 20-year-old son slashed their wrists when told of the decision. Reports on the number of Kurds affected varied from 12 to 13 to 25, and the Home Office declined to release a figure.
WORLD
August 19, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, This post has been updated. See the notes below for details.
BEIRUT -- Thousands of Syrians, mostly ethnic Kurds, crossed from Syria into Iraq on Monday in what has become one of the largest sustained refugee flows in the more than two years since the Syrian conflict began. They are not fleeing clashes between government forces and rebels, but are running away from a spinoff conflict: the raging battle between Kurdish militiamen and Islamist Arab rebels for control of large swaths of northern Syria, home to most of Syria's Kurdish minority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1992 | GEORGE BLACK, George Black, a writer for many years on foreign affairs, is working on a book about China's democracy movement
Meeting at the White House for the first time since the election, George Bush and Bill Clinton are said to have talked mainly about foreign affairs. The President-elect, with his mind on the domestic economy, might prefer not to think too much about the outside world. But he will not escape it, given the large number of ticking time-bombs that are Bush's parting gift to him. The most lethal of these may be the matter of the Iraqi Kurds.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
The Diyarbakir Rotary Club meets on Wednesdays at 6 p.m., a model of civility and hospitality. That puzzles some people. "We had 50 Rotarians out from Istanbul, and they gaped to find us in suits and ties. What did they expect? Funny hats and baggy pants?" asked Musa Ekinci, a young Diyarbakir contractor who once managed a Long John Silver's restaurant in Virginia.
OPINION
February 28, 1999 | Thomas Goltz, Thomas Goltz is author of "Azerbaijan Diary: A Rogue Reporter's Adventures in an Oil-rich, War-torn, Post-Soviet Republic."
For the past fortnight, television viewers around the globe have been treated to the nearly nightly spectacle of Kurds attacking embassies and consulates throughout Europe in a passionate if confused display of solidarity and protest over the capture of Kurd leader Abdullah Ocalan. First, Kurds occupied Greek and Kenyan facilities over the two countries' reported involvement in Ocalan's arrest by Turkish commandos in Nairobi on Feb. 15.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkey's parliament issued an ultimatum to Syria, demanding that it expel Turkish Kurdish rebels from its territory or "face the consequences." Turkish leaders accuse Syria of sheltering the rebels, who carry out cross-border attacks on Turkish territory. Syria denies the accusation, and Turkey's harsh rhetoric has triggered fears of a regional conflict.
WORLD
October 5, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times
AFRIN, Syria - This tranquil town in northwest Syria is a haven from the warfare convulsing much of the country, but the calm points to profound challenges facing the country - and the entire region - when the fighting ends. The laid-back guards at the checkpoints are Kurdish militiamen. The mustachioed man whose image greets visitors is Abdullah Ocalan, who is serving a life sentence in a Turkish prison for his leadership role in the Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, a group deemed a terrorist organization by Turkey, the United States and the European Union.
WORLD
June 7, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Buffeted by criticism and demands for reform, Syrian President Bashar Assad opened his party congress Monday by sidestepping all mention of political change, pledging continued devotion to pan-Arab nationalism and calling modern technology a threat to Arab identity. The 39-year-old president had touted this week's Baath Party gathering as a turning point for a nation under pressure.
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