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Kurt Andersen

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BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
K-III Communications named Caroline Miller editor in chief of New York magazine, replacing Kurt Andersen, who left the company in August.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The public intellectual has become a rare creature in America, but Kurt Andersen has helped keep it from going extinct. He co-founded Spy magazine, was editor of New York magazine and now writes pieces like Time's 2011 person of the year story, the Protester. These days, though, he mostly splits his time between hosting "Studio 360," broadcast weekly to 160 NPR stations, and writing the occasional bestselling novel. His next book, "True Believers" (Random House: 447 pp., $27), comes out Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | Scott Timberg
For a visionary, Kurt Andersen is keeping it pretty low-key. The writer is sitting quietly in blazer and jeans in front of a class at Pasadena's Art Center College of Design. He's not just a visiting professor but the school's visionary in residence. The class' students, with their retro hats, black duds and horizontal stripes, could be making a French New Wave film or rehearsing the latest edition of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2003 | From Reuters
Kurt Andersen, a founder of the satirical magazine Spy and former editor of New York magazine, is getting back into publishing, this time as editorial director of Colors, the once-provocative glossy published by fashion company Benetton. Andersen, 49, who reenters the magazine world after a few years of hosting a cultural program on public radio and completing his second novel, will try to restore buzz to a publication that has failed to attract much attention recently.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget bestseller lists. If you want to know what new book is hot, walk through an airplane and see which hardcover has become the preferred traveling companion. Stuart Gavert, a hair colorist who works in his own salon in Beverly Hills and ministers to a loyal New York clientele as well, flies between the coasts twice a month. "The last time I went to New York," he said recently, "six people in business class were reading 'Turn of the Century.'
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | Scott Timberg
For a visionary, Kurt Andersen is keeping it pretty low-key. The writer is sitting quietly in blazer and jeans in front of a class at Pasadena's Art Center College of Design. He's not just a visiting professor but the school's visionary in residence. The class' students, with their retro hats, black duds and horizontal stripes, could be making a French New Wave film or rehearsing the latest edition of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writers
Who is Celia Brady and why is she saying all those terrible things about Hollywood? Brady is the pseudonymous show business columnist for Spy magazine, the 2-year-old New York-based satirical monthly that startled the journalism world with its cutting-down-to-size exposes about the Rich and Famous.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The public intellectual has become a rare creature in America, but Kurt Andersen has helped keep it from going extinct. He co-founded Spy magazine, was editor of New York magazine and now writes pieces like Time's 2011 person of the year story, the Protester. These days, though, he mostly splits his time between hosting "Studio 360," broadcast weekly to 160 NPR stations, and writing the occasional bestselling novel. His next book, "True Believers" (Random House: 447 pp., $27), comes out Tuesday.
BOOKS
March 4, 2007 | Susan Straight, Susan Straight, a professor at UC Riverside, is the author of six novels, mostly recently "A Million Nightingales."
LIKE many readers, I love historical fiction that transports me back to a particular place in the world and immerses me fully and imaginatively in the lives of its inhabitants. I remember finding, when I was very young, a paperback historical romance set in biblical times that began in Egypt, moved to Galilee and ended at Masada; that's when I realized how vividly fiction can re-create places and lives.
BOOKS
March 4, 2007 | Susan Straight, Susan Straight, a professor at UC Riverside, is the author of six novels, mostly recently "A Million Nightingales."
LIKE many readers, I love historical fiction that transports me back to a particular place in the world and immerses me fully and imaginatively in the lives of its inhabitants. I remember finding, when I was very young, a paperback historical romance set in biblical times that began in Egypt, moved to Galilee and ended at Masada; that's when I realized how vividly fiction can re-create places and lives.
BOOKS
December 3, 2006 | Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a San Francisco-based writer and critic.
ELEGIES for bygone cult magazines -- once blazingly hip, now defunct or compromised -- have come to make up their own genre. Even the finest examples (Gary Wolf on Wired, Marc Weingarten on the early days of New York and Rolling Stone) share a template. In the beginning was ardor: a handful of ambitious, attractive youths in a soundtracked montage of halcyon days and all-night editorial debauches.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2003 | From Reuters
Kurt Andersen, a founder of the satirical magazine Spy and former editor of New York magazine, is getting back into publishing, this time as editorial director of Colors, the once-provocative glossy published by fashion company Benetton. Andersen, 49, who reenters the magazine world after a few years of hosting a cultural program on public radio and completing his second novel, will try to restore buzz to a publication that has failed to attract much attention recently.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget bestseller lists. If you want to know what new book is hot, walk through an airplane and see which hardcover has become the preferred traveling companion. Stuart Gavert, a hair colorist who works in his own salon in Beverly Hills and ministers to a loyal New York clientele as well, flies between the coasts twice a month. "The last time I went to New York," he said recently, "six people in business class were reading 'Turn of the Century.'
BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
K-III Communications named Caroline Miller editor in chief of New York magazine, replacing Kurt Andersen, who left the company in August.
BOOKS
December 3, 2006 | Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a San Francisco-based writer and critic.
ELEGIES for bygone cult magazines -- once blazingly hip, now defunct or compromised -- have come to make up their own genre. Even the finest examples (Gary Wolf on Wired, Marc Weingarten on the early days of New York and Rolling Stone) share a template. In the beginning was ardor: a handful of ambitious, attractive youths in a soundtracked montage of halcyon days and all-night editorial debauches.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writers
Who is Celia Brady and why is she saying all those terrible things about Hollywood? Brady is the pseudonymous show business columnist for Spy magazine, the 2-year-old New York-based satirical monthly that startled the journalism world with its cutting-down-to-size exposes about the Rich and Famous.
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