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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2009 | Alicia Lozano
Classical music station KUSC-FM (91.5) is honoring outgoing Los Angeles Philharmonic music director Esa-Pekka Salonen with special programs this month, including live broadcasts of two of his final performances and a documentary commemorating the maestro's 17 years with the orchestra. First up is "E-P in L.A.: Reinventing the Los Angeles Philharmonic," a two-hour documentary featuring interviews with collaborators Frank Gehry, Peter Sellars, Deborah Borda and Ernest Fleischmann, musicians and commentary from Salonen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2008 | Lee Margulies
Classical music station KUSC-FM (91.5), which already reaches well beyond its L.A. base with stations that carry its programming in Palm Springs, Thousand Oaks and Santa Barbara, is expanding farther up the California coast. Station officials said Wednesday that they had agreed to pay $800,000 for KGDP-FM (90.5) in Santa Maria. The outlet formerly carried religious programming but has been off the air since August. It will begin simulcasting KUSC once the deal is approved by the Federal Communications Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2008 | Diane Haithman
Los Angeles Opera is partnering with classical music station KUSC-FM (91.5) to present live broadcasts of the first two performances of the company's 2008-09 season. At 6 p.m. on Sept. 6, the radio station will air "Il Trittico," an evening of three one-act Puccini operas. And at 2 p.m. Sept. 7, KUSC will follow with "The Fly," a new opera composed by Howard Shore and staged by David Cronenberg. Shore and Cronenberg, both newcomers to opera, collaborated on the 1986 movie "The Fly."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008 | Sean Mitchell, Special to The Times
In THE last year, listeners to classical music radio in Los Angeles have noticed something different about segments of the weekday sound of KUSC-FM (91.5) -- evidence of human beings talking to them live between the symphonies and concertos of Beethoven, Mozart and Brahms.
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