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NEWS
June 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Government supporters won all the seats up for election in a new transitional legislature, official returns showed in Kuwait, after opposition leaders called for a vote boycott. The election filled two-thirds of the 75-seat National Council. The government, which dissolved Parliament in 1986 for criticizing the country's leaders, will appoint the remaining seats. Officials said 61.5% of the electorate voted, but the opposition put the figure at about 50%.
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NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
Kuwait's parliament on Tuesday handily rejected a decree by the country's ruler giving women the right to vote and run for office. Religious conservatives were joined in the 41-21 vote by many liberal lawmakers who said they support women's rights but disapproved of the emir's issuing the edict while parliament was out of session. "This is tragic," said Rula Dashti, a 35-year-old women's rights activist. "A parliament votes to limit democracy--what a farce!"
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NEWS
December 11, 1990 | Reuters
Kuwait's government-in-exile said Monday it would not agree to give Iraq even one inch of Kuwaiti territory and branded as "totally untrue" reports that it is involved in secret negotiations with Iraq. Foreign Minister Sabah al Ahmed al Sabah, in remarks quoted by the Kuwaiti news agency, said a report in the British newspaper the Independent on Sunday was based "on fabricated rumors . . . and totally untrue."
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Kuwait formed a new government and included Sheik Saud al Sabah as oil minister, even though controversy surrounding his work as information minister had brought down the previous Cabinet. Sheik Sabah al Ahmed al Jabbar al Sabah returned as first deputy prime minister and foreign minister. Islamists in the parliament forced the previous Cabinet to resign this month in a dispute over the Information Ministry allowing the display of banned books.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kuwaiti resistance, which for nearly two months carried out a campaign of ambushes, sniper attacks and harassment against Iraqi soldiers in Kuwait, has scaled back its activities in the face of violent retaliation against not only the resistance fighters but other Kuwaitis as well, according to sources close to the Kuwaiti government.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already facing brutal harassment in their northern Iraqi homeland, large numbers of Kurds in Kuwait have been prevented from returning to their jobs, and at least seven have been arrested and have subsequently disappeared, according to spokesmen for the small Kurdish community here.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
Six main opposition parties banded together on Monday to demand democracy and an election date, and diplomats and Kuwaiti government officials said President Bush wrote to Kuwait's emir urging greater pluralism. The groups that came together to appeal for freedom have often quarreled in the past. "This is the first time we have all been united under one tent," said Sheik Jasim Mohalhel, leader of a fundamentalist organization.
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Cabinet resigned ahead of a no-confidence vote Tuesday against Information Minister Saud al Sabah, a member of the ruling Sabah family. Saud is at the center of a crisis between the government and Islamist lawmakers who were offended by the displaying of banned books, which they see as un-Islamic. Political sources expect the prime minister, Sheik Saad al Abdullah al Sabah, to conduct a Cabinet reshuffle that could bring back Saud in another ministry.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city, where memories of Iraqi rapes and executions remain vivid, these are anxious days: Television is offering advice on how to seal rooms from poison-gas attacks, stores are packed with families stockpiling water and other essentials, and desert camps are being set up to cope with an expected tide of war refugees.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the illuminated boulevard that has been nicknamed "Democracy Street" in this oil emirate, Mohammed Rashed Hafaity is packing in the crowds at tent meetings every Tuesday and Saturday night. More than 1,000 men in white robes wait eagerly in the open air for more than an hour to hear this veterinarian turned politician and satirist--part Pat Paulsen, part Ross Perot.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first order of business in this nation's new bastion of democracy was an angry protest from the emirate's powerful defense minister, a cousin of the ruling emir. Accusations from a member of the National Assembly that a high-ranking official of his ministry took $100 million in bribes on defense contracts were, to say the least, inappropriate, Sheik Ali al Salim al Sabah, the royally appointed defense minister, insisted early this week.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday, as the polls were about to close at Al Hassan Ibn al Haitham High School, Khalid Adwa, a 32-year-old firebrand Islamic priest, strode out to the school's courtyard. Within seconds, scores of voters and campaign workers left their posts. They fell in behind the imam, dropped to their knees and joined the charismatic clergyman in evening prayers.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business as usual reigns in this desert sheikdom. Eight months after Saddam Hussein's Iraqi legions were repulsed, the passion, anxieties and dark-of-night retributions of the immediate postwar days have softened. Desert Storm camouflage has given way to blue suits of deal-makers from Europe, the United States and Japan. "Mad Max has gone," as one Western diplomat puts it, "and the carpetbaggers have taken over." Now, too, the grasp of bureaucracy is once again choking business enterprise.
NEWS
February 11, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's government-in-exile, steeling itself to the prospect of returning to a country in ruins, is assembling an emergency team in a staging area near here to move in swiftly behind allied forces and restore basic public services to a liberated Kuwait. Contracts worth up to $800 million have been awarded to companies worldwide to bring in emergency water, power, food and medical supplies to Kuwaitis in the critical days after Iraqi troops are driven out of the country.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's exiled emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, extended an emotional greeting to his Cabinet on Thursday as he returned to the liberated Gulf emirate for the first time since fleeing to safety against a storm of advancing Iraqi tanks. Sheik Jabbar covered his face with his hands as he stepped from a blue-and-white Kuwait Airways jet and then stooped to kiss the ground at Kuwait's international airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1991 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Tuesday morning when the Marine Corps formally confirmed what Carol Bentzlin had suspected for months: Her husband, Cpl. Stephen E. Bentzlin, died when an allied missile mistakenly struck the armored vehicle carrying him and seven other members of his unit. "What can you do?" Bentzlin said after hearing the official confirmation in a telephone call. "It happened and I need to come to grips with that."
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's ambassador to the United States has offered to help an Orange County woman whose husband was killed in the Gulf War and who says that the military has been slow to return his remaining personnel effects and make death benefit payments. Sheik Saud al Nasir al Sabah said Monday that his office had contacted Carol Bentzlin of San Juan Capistrano, widow of Marine Cpl. Stephen E.
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