Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsKuwait Liberated Territory
IN THE NEWS

Kuwait Liberated Territory

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American tank crews, on the attack in one of the biggest armored battles since World War II, were ordered today to halt offensive fire against badly mauled Republican Guard tank divisions in southeastern Iraq. The order to American troops came eight hours after as many as 800 tanks from the 1st and 3rd Armored divisions of the U.S. Army's VII Corps were reported battling two armored divisions of the Republican Guard about 50 miles west of the city of Basra.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Kuwait city or bust. After seven months of Iraqi occupation, the Kuwaiti capital had been liberated--and nearly 1,000 restless journalists already bored with war and intrigued by peace prepared to slingshot themselves into Kuwait any way they could. It wasn't going to be easy.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Once Iraqi forces are pushed out of the country, the restored Kuwaiti government plans to impose martial law for at least three months and perhaps as long as a year, according to detailed plans drawn up by the U.S. Army to guide American forces assisting Kuwaiti officials.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S.-led forces on Sunday rounded up more than 1,400 Iraqi soldiers--including a brigadier general--from the Persian Gulf island of Faylakah, the last piece of enemy-occupied Kuwaiti territory, officials said. Allied troops also seized 17 planes and eight helicopters at an air base in Iraq as mop-up operations continued after the lightning rout of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's forces, military officials said.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a cessation of hostilities concluded Kuwait's seven-month ordeal of occupation, government officials here moved swiftly Thursday to control sporadic outbreaks of urban violence in a city where basic, day-to-day government has become another casualty of war. Two guards at the Palestine Liberation Organization embassy were shot by angry Kuwaitis, and gunfire rang out from a school and near a police station in a heavily Palestinian neighborhood of the Kuwaiti capital.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush announced a suspension of hostilities in the Persian Gulf War Wednesday night, declaring to the nation and the world: "Kuwait is liberated. Iraq's army is defeated. Our military objectives are met." Speaking from the Oval Office just 97 hours after U.S. and allied forces stormed into Iraq and Kuwait, the President said the coalition would suspend all offensive combat operations at midnight EST, and laid out conditions that Iraq must satisfy to make the suspension permanent.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush vowed Tuesday that Saddam Hussein will fail in his attempt to "save the remnants of power and control" and ordered Iraqi troops to "lay down their arms" to avoid annihilation. Bush's statement, coming shortly after the Iraqi president tried in a radio broadcast to claim a shred of victory in retreat, amounted to a demand for unconditional surrender and was clear notice that Iraq will not be able to withdraw from Kuwait on its own terms.
NEWS
February 27, 1991
"I've been kissed by more Kuwaiti men tonight than I can count." --CBS correspondent Bob McKeown, after his TV crew made it into Kuwait city.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coalition forces crushed resistance around Kuwait city and cut off the main body of Iraq's elite Republican Guard on Tuesday as Saddam Hussein's armies reeled and fled before a massive allied air and land offensive. "The Iraqi army is in full retreat, although there is some fighting going on," Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Kelly, chief of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in Washington. "Tomorrow, when the sun comes up, the question in my mind is whether the enemy is going to be there."
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
It was a scene straight out of a Hollywood movie--liberated wartime civilians welcoming a conquering hero. But the only weapon this man of the hour carried was a microphone. He was a CBS reporter, Bob McKeown, who, with his crew of three, slipped into Kuwait city Tuesday and sent back to American TV viewers remarkable, live footage of street scenes with joyous residents and resistance fighters. What he conquered was military censors--the footage wasn't cleared by anybody in government.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a cessation of hostilities concluded Kuwait's seven-month ordeal of occupation, government officials here moved swiftly Thursday to control sporadic outbreaks of urban violence in a city where basic, day-to-day government has become another casualty of war. Two guards at the Palestine Liberation Organization embassy were shot by angry Kuwaitis, and gunfire rang out from a school and near a police station in a heavily Palestinian neighborhood of the Kuwaiti capital.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush announced a suspension of hostilities in the Persian Gulf War Wednesday night, declaring to the nation and the world: "Kuwait is liberated. Iraq's army is defeated. Our military objectives are met." Speaking from the Oval Office just 97 hours after U.S. and allied forces stormed into Iraq and Kuwait, the President said the coalition would suspend all offensive combat operations at midnight EST, and laid out conditions that Iraq must satisfy to make the suspension permanent.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | KIM MURPHY and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Kuwait's liberation army paraded into the nation's capital Wednesday on rumbling chariots of armor as thousands of cheering, chanting Kuwaitis poured into the streets in celebration. "Blood for Freedom: Welcome Allied Forces," read a banner draped over the main highway into Kuwait, which was choked by midday with dozens of allied tanks, supply trucks and a honking stream of Mercedes-Benzes, BMWs and Chevrolets in a city come suddenly to life after seven months of occupation.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American tank crews, on the attack in one of the biggest armored battles since World War II, were ordered today to halt offensive fire against badly mauled Republican Guard tank divisions in southeastern Iraq. The order to American troops came eight hours after as many as 800 tanks from the 1st and 3rd Armored divisions of the U.S. Army's VII Corps were reported battling two armored divisions of the Republican Guard about 50 miles west of the city of Basra.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Once Iraqi forces are pushed out of the country, the restored Kuwaiti government plans to impose martial law for at least three months and perhaps as long as a year, according to detailed plans drawn up by the U.S. Army to guide American forces assisting Kuwaiti officials.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush vowed Tuesday that Saddam Hussein will fail in his attempt to "save the remnants of power and control" and ordered Iraqi troops to "lay down their arms" to avoid annihilation. Bush's statement, coming shortly after the Iraqi president tried in a radio broadcast to claim a shred of victory in retreat, amounted to a demand for unconditional surrender and was clear notice that Iraq will not be able to withdraw from Kuwait on its own terms.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | Associated Press
Here is the transcript of President Bush's statement Tuesday in response to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's radio statement announcing that Iraqi forces would withdraw from Kuwait: Saddam's most recent speech is an outrage. He is not withdrawing. His defeated forces are retreating. He is trying to claim victory in the midst of a rout. And he is not voluntarily giving up Kuwait. He is trying to save the remnants of power and control in the Middle East by every means possible.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene Tuesday was precisely what the Pentagon had spent years trying to avoid--ever since the invasion of Grenada in 1983. As allied forces stormed into Iraq and Kuwait, routing retreating Iraqi forces, Americans saw dramatic moments of surrender and liberation televised live by American news correspondents who had violated Pentagon rules and taken to the battlefield unsupervised, carrying portable satellite "uplinks."
NEWS
February 27, 1991
"I've been kissed by more Kuwaiti men tonight than I can count." --CBS correspondent Bob McKeown, after his TV crew made it into Kuwait city.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coalition forces crushed resistance around Kuwait city and cut off the main body of Iraq's elite Republican Guard on Tuesday as Saddam Hussein's armies reeled and fled before a massive allied air and land offensive. "The Iraqi army is in full retreat, although there is some fighting going on," Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Kelly, chief of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in Washington. "Tomorrow, when the sun comes up, the question in my mind is whether the enemy is going to be there."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|