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Kuwait Politics

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NEWS
March 15, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's exiled emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, extended an emotional greeting to his Cabinet on Thursday as he returned to the liberated Gulf emirate for the first time since fleeing to safety against a storm of advancing Iraqi tanks. Sheik Jabbar covered his face with his hands as he stepped from a blue-and-white Kuwait Airways jet and then stooped to kiss the ground at Kuwait's international airport.
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NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
Kuwait's parliament on Tuesday handily rejected a decree by the country's ruler giving women the right to vote and run for office. Religious conservatives were joined in the 41-21 vote by many liberal lawmakers who said they support women's rights but disapproved of the emir's issuing the edict while parliament was out of session. "This is tragic," said Rula Dashti, a 35-year-old women's rights activist. "A parliament votes to limit democracy--what a farce!"
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NEWS
October 13, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kuwaiti government is preparing to make important concessions for democratic reforms to counter growing criticism of the ruling Sabah family that has threatened to breach Kuwait's united front against the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Pro-government candidates may become the largest bloc in Kuwait's new parliament, gaining at the expense of Muslim fundamentalists who had been the largest group, election results indicated Tuesday. Independent readings of the results showed that religious deputies trying to advance their vision of an Islamic society slipped from 19 to 16 seats, while pro-government deputies appeared to have gained ground in the National Assembly, moving from 15 to 18 seats.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of guns, their weapons are soft Arabic chants and posters of their beloved emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah. Their battlefields are the mosques and living rooms of Kuwait city. For armament against the Iraqi soldiers, they tote their children at their sides.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
Kuwait's parliament on Tuesday handily rejected a decree by the country's ruler giving women the right to vote and run for office. Religious conservatives were joined in the 41-21 vote by many liberal lawmakers who said they support women's rights but disapproved of the emir's issuing the edict while parliament was out of session. "This is tragic," said Rula Dashti, a 35-year-old women's rights activist. "A parliament votes to limit democracy--what a farce!"
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The handwriting of the smuggled letter was barely legible, the undisciplined scrawl of a teen-ager. But there was nothing childish in the words, a pledge of determination for the freedom that Kuwaiti opposition leaders say will transform their nation from a feudal sheikdom into a real democracy. "You can be proud," the 16-year-old wrote to his parents from the underground, within the resistance movement in Iraqi-occupied Kuwait. "I am a man now and I will never be driven out.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition leaders balked Monday at signing on to a new interim government in Kuwait, complaining that the ruling emir did not commit to a speedy restoration of the dissolved national Parliament.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He lies in a hospital bed unable to move, unable to work, unable to do much of anything except try to remember who the man was who came to the door one night shortly after Kuwait was liberated, greeted him politely and pulled out a gun. Hamad Jouan, a former member of Parliament and a leader of the pro-democracy movement in Kuwait, knows he had seen the man before.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwaitis assembled from all over the world called Monday for the United Nations to authorize "every possible means" to force Iraqi troops to withdraw from their country and declared a holy war against Iraq's "treachery and aggression." "There is no place for you in Kuwait. You will be forced out, whether by means of peace or by means of war," Sheik Saad al Abdullah al Sabah, the crown prince, asserted. "The signs of victory are already on the horizon.
BOOKS
September 11, 1994 | Rana Kabbani, Rana Kabbani is a writer on Middle East and Muslim affairs. Her most recent book is "Europe's Myths of Orient: Devise and Rule" (Indiana University Press)
Muslim stereotypes in the West grow out of a long historical tradition of anxiety about Islam. In the Middle Ages, anti-Islamic polemics were motivated not only by the fear that Islam's armies might advance into the heart of Europe, but by the concern that its far superior civilization would take over the continent. In the 19th Century, portrayals of the Muslims as barbarians were motivated by the need to justify Europe's colonial subjugation of their lands and exploitation of their resources.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Young Bedouin voters knelt in afternoon prayer beside cordless telephones. Campaign workers in flowing white robes huddled over computer printouts in parking lots festooned with posters, high-tech Winnebagos and tents; others manned polling booths, offering last-minute lamb buffets and fancy computer-graphics displays Monday to the stream of Kuwait's elite electorate. A small group of women marched in silent protest against the all-male balloting.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a typical night on Democracy Street, a sandy boulevard flanked by garish neon, a dozen election tents and dinner buffets ranging from camel meat to lamb kebabs. Through it all, thousands of white-robed Kuwaitis wandered tent to tent in search of truth, a good meal and a taste of the real issues behind Monday's crucial legislative elections, the first real test of democracy in the land that half a million Americans fought to liberate 19 months ago.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In elegant, marble-tiled villas in this city built on oil and ease, the dinner talk is of reconstruction projects. The top priority, people say, is a new highway south to Saudi Arabia with six lanes--one way. It is only partly a joke. A striking number of Kuwait's brightest, best-educated citizens, deeply demoralized by the postwar political climate, say they plan to leave the country. Many who stay are hedging their bets, opening bank accounts in dollars and buying houses overseas.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's democratic movement mobilized Tuesday as close to 1,000 people met outside a mosque to oppose their emir's decision not to hold elections until October, 1992. "We want to tell people that the complete freedom of Kuwait has not happened yet," said Ahmed Bakir, a member of the Parliament that the emir dissolved in 1986. "The legitimate government of Kuwait is not back yet."
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months after the triumphant climax of Operation Desert Storm, the Bush Administration's hopes of seizing a new opportunity to solve some of the Mideast's toughest problems are beginning to seriously falter. Aggressive moves to convert a military victory into historic progress that would leave President Bush's mark on the volatile region as well as the world have run into severe complications--some predictable, some unforeseen.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months after the triumphant climax of Operation Desert Storm, the Bush Administration's hopes of seizing a new opportunity to solve some of the Mideast's toughest problems are beginning to seriously falter. Aggressive moves to convert a military victory into historic progress that would leave President Bush's mark on the volatile region as well as the world have run into severe complications--some predictable, some unforeseen.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a typical night on Democracy Street, a sandy boulevard flanked by garish neon, a dozen election tents and dinner buffets ranging from camel meat to lamb kebabs. Through it all, thousands of white-robed Kuwaitis wandered tent to tent in search of truth, a good meal and a taste of the real issues behind Monday's crucial legislative elections, the first real test of democracy in the land that half a million Americans fought to liberate 19 months ago.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, clearly concerned about reports of summary executions and business-as-usual autocracy in postwar Kuwait, told the emir Monday that Washington's future political and military support will be affected by the country's human rights record.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition leaders balked Monday at signing on to a new interim government in Kuwait, complaining that the ruling emir did not commit to a speedy restoration of the dissolved national Parliament.
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