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Kuwaitis

NEWS
December 19, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi forces that invaded and occupied Kuwait tortured and killed hundreds of victims, even leaving infants to die, according to a report issued Tuesday by Amnesty International. The 82-page document was the first comprehensive report by the London-based human rights organization on the Iraqi occupation of Kuwait. It was based on interviews with more than 100 people, mainly Kuwaitis who fled to Saudi Arabia and other Persian Gulf countries, and was delivered to the U.N.
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NEWS
March 14, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after the liberation of Kuwait, Haya Mughni heard there was a Swiss doctor at the Red Crescent headquarters who needed an assistant. The doctor spoke no English or Arabic, and Mughni, who speaks French, volunteered. Seven months ago, such a thing would have been unheard of. A Muslim woman from the Gulf did not work side by side with a man, especially a foreigner, certainly not in a hospital setting.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Palestinians living in Kuwait, the signs of hostility were as plain to see as the clothes on their backs. Bands of embittered Kuwaitis, angered at what they saw as Palestinian collaboration with the invaders from Iraq, roamed the streets at night looking for targets, and the Palestinians were easily identified because they usually wear Western clothing instead of the long white robes favored by Kuwaitis. Hakam, a 25-year-old public works employee, needed no personal experience with all this.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush delivered a mild rebuke on Monday to Kuwait in the wake of the first trials of defendants accused of collaborating with the Iraqi occupation. He urged the Kuwaiti government to "extend a fair trial to everybody." While Bush's comments demonstrated mild displeasure with the trial's conduct, the President went out of his way to emphasize the brutality that Kuwaitis had been subjected to during the seven months that Iraqi forces occupied their nation.
WORLD
February 27, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Iraqi government leaders in Baghdad welcomed the highest-ranking Kuwaiti envoy since former President Saddam Hussein's 1990 invasion of its neighbor. The timing of the visit by Kuwait's deputy prime minister, Sheik Mohammed al Sabah, was symbolic: It came as Kuwaitis celebrated the 18th anniversary of the U.S.-led military campaign that drove out Hussein's forces. Much of the tiny Persian Gulf nation was left looted and devastated by the Iraqi occupation, and Kuwait still claims billions of dollars in war reparations.
NEWS
February 19, 1991
Radio Kuwait has been on the air since shortly after Saddam Hussein's forces stormed the emirate on Aug. 2. Initially, it operated in Kuwait, but it has moved to safer, secret surroundings under heavy guard in eastern Saudia Arabia. A government-sponsored operation, Radio Kuwait provides NEWS, COMMENTARY, MUSIC AND PRAYER to the 350,000 Kuwaitis who remain in the emirate after 400,000 fled. Since its first days, the station has been in an airwave war with Baghdad.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A delegation of former hostages and "human shields" is lobbying Congress in support of President Bush's action in the Persian Gulf, offering eyewitness accounts to counter what they fear are misperceptions. For one thing, they would like to convince Congress that sanctions are not likely to force Iraq out of Kuwait. "Food is being used as a double-edged sword. The shelves in Baghdad are full but families in Kuwait are almost starving," said Todd Davis, 42, a bank manager from Banning, Calif.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the cacophony of tinkling teacups, beeping pagers, ringing cellular telephones and chatter that enlivens a Kuwaiti businessman's social evening, a palpable silence descended as--on a television screen at the front of a room here--George Bush waved a final farewell as U.S. President and mounted the steps to the plane that would take him from Washington. The burbling of the water pipes stopped. Several men put down their playing cards.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | This dispatch was written by a Washington Post correspondent Saturday and delayed in transmission
Occupied but not conquered, Kuwait city today is a mixture of stubborn resistance and defiance by its native population, and fear bordering on panic among the Westerners and other expatriates held hostage here by Iraq. Nine days after Iraq's tanks and troops invaded, food is still available, but people are aware that the supplies are likely to dwindle fast. Many people also have no way of getting cash, since most banks are still closed.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In elegant, marble-tiled villas in this city built on oil and ease, the dinner talk is of reconstruction projects. The top priority, people say, is a new highway south to Saudi Arabia with six lanes--one way. It is only partly a joke. A striking number of Kuwait's brightest, best-educated citizens, deeply demoralized by the postwar political climate, say they plan to leave the country. Many who stay are hedging their bets, opening bank accounts in dollars and buying houses overseas.
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