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Kwanzaa

ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four dancers, scarves waving, undulate to the beat of Nigerian chants. Adding life to the desolate stretch of Pico-Midtown where they are temporarily based, the members of Lula Washington Dance Theatre take their cues from guest instructor Tamara Mobley, seven months pregnant, who more than keeps up with the rest. "Afunga," an African dance of welcome, is part of "Gospel Christmas," a new production created by choreographer Washington that will be performed at Cal State L.A.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1996
The now-infamous Texaco executives were caught on tape deriding Kwanzaa, the seven-day African American harvest celebration that occurs just after Christmas. In fact, many people, including some blacks, are not sure what the holiday is all about. This weekend in Pasadena, there will be an effort to educate people of all races about Kwanzaa (the Swahili words means "first fruits").
FOOD
December 19, 1991 | ERIC V. COPAGE
If you want to adhere strictly to the Kwanzaa program as Maulana (Ron) Karenga, chairman of black studies at Cal State Long Beach, conceived it, here is what you need. 1. Mazao : Fruits and vegetables, which stand for the product of unified effort. 2. Mkeka : A straw place mat, which represents the reverence for tradition. 3. Vivunzi : An ear of corn for each child in the family. 4.
FOOD
December 28, 1995 | MAYI BRADY and LAURIE OCHOA
Kwanzaa celebrations are in full swing, but the best day is yet to come. For it's the sixth day, Dec. 31, of the seven-day holiday, when the Karamu, or feast, is held. "In addition to food," writes Eric Copage in his cookbook, "Kwanzaa: An African-American Celebration of Culture and Cooking" (Morrow), "the Karamu is an opportunity for a confetti storm of cultural expression: dance and music, readings, remembrances."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993
Today marks the start of Kwanzaa, an African American holiday that celebrates culture, family and community. For seven days, through Jan. 1, African Americans will gather in their homes and at community events to reflect on the past year and to focus on the ideals that will enable them to lead prosperous and meaningful lives in the upcoming year.
FOOD
December 26, 1996 | ELIZABETH SOFTKY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1965, my father, W.D. Campbell, came west from Arkansas, looking for the California dream. Instead, he found the Los Angeles nightmare--job discrimination, police checkpoints and certain parts of the city that were off-limits to blacks after sundown. He struggled alone against these problems until he ran into a man named Ron Karenga, a charismatic activist and black studies student.
FOOD
December 19, 1991 | ERIC V. COPAGE, Copage is the author of "Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Culture and Cooking" ( William Morrow & Co. Inc., 1991) and an editor at the New York Times Magazine
I was never a holiday kind of guy. Perhaps it was because we observed few holiday rituals of any kind. Although we put up a Christmas tree every year, there was no ceremony to it--no drinking of eggnog or listening to carols while hanging ornaments. To me, the tree seemed more or less like another piece of furniture. During the past few years, however, the holiday season has taken on a new meaning for me as my family sits at the dinner table the week following Christmas to celebrate Kwanzaa.
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