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Kwanzaa

FOOD
December 26, 1996 | ELIZABETH SOFTKY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1965, my father, W.D. Campbell, came west from Arkansas, looking for the California dream. Instead, he found the Los Angeles nightmare--job discrimination, police checkpoints and certain parts of the city that were off-limits to blacks after sundown. He struggled alone against these problems until he ran into a man named Ron Karenga, a charismatic activist and black studies student.
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FOOD
December 19, 1991 | ERIC V. COPAGE, Copage is the author of "Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Culture and Cooking" ( William Morrow & Co. Inc., 1991) and an editor at the New York Times Magazine
I was never a holiday kind of guy. Perhaps it was because we observed few holiday rituals of any kind. Although we put up a Christmas tree every year, there was no ceremony to it--no drinking of eggnog or listening to carols while hanging ornaments. To me, the tree seemed more or less like another piece of furniture. During the past few years, however, the holiday season has taken on a new meaning for me as my family sits at the dinner table the week following Christmas to celebrate Kwanzaa.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2001 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't know much about Kwanzaa? Neither do the kids on "Rugrats"--until tonight's episode (8:30 p.m., Nickelodeon), when the Carmichael family's jovial Aunt T. arrives and insists on celebrating it. There was a time when you could have predicted what would come next: a camouflaged lecture on African American heritage followed by a message about the need for tolerance and respect. It's a mark of how sophisticated children's programming can be these days that the script by Lisa D.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1991 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Besides offering celebration dances of the Djola, Malinke and Bambara peoples (among others), the Saturday program at Highways by Djimbe West African Drummers and Dancers arguably represented a coming-of-age ceremony for this Van Nuys-based group.
FOOD
December 28, 1995 | MAYI BRADY and LAURIE OCHOA
Kwanzaa celebrations are in full swing, but the best day is yet to come. For it's the sixth day, Dec. 31, of the seven-day holiday, when the Karamu, or feast, is held. "In addition to food," writes Eric Copage in his cookbook, "Kwanzaa: An African-American Celebration of Culture and Cooking" (Morrow), "the Karamu is an opportunity for a confetti storm of cultural expression: dance and music, readings, remembrances."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1997 | VERONIQUE DE TURENNE
Cal Lutheran University will get an early jump on this year's Kwanzaa observance, with daylong festivities scheduled Dec. 6. Kwanzaa, an African American cultural celebration created in 1966 by Maulana Karenga, chairman of the black studies department at Cal State Long Beach, takes its name from the Swahili phrase meaning "first fruits." The holiday is celebrated from Dec. 26 through Jan. 1, and revolves around the lighting of seven candles symbolizing the seven principles of Kwanzaa.
NEWS
December 29, 1994
The last event of Kwanzaa, the African American holiday celebration that starts the day after Christmas and lasts through Jan. 1, will be held Friday night at the Perspective on Open Awareness, 2045 N. Fair Oaks Ave. This year's Kwanzaa events will end with Karamu, a traditional African feast, said Amina Thomas, chair of the nine-member Pasadena-Altadena Kwanzaa Organizing Committee. The Karamu meal will be from 7 to 9 p.m and is open to the public.
FOOD
December 26, 1993 | RUSS PARSONS
This year, more than 18 million people of African descent in London, the Bahamas, Brazil, Kenya and Zimbabwe, as well as the United States will celebrate Kwanzaa, a holiday based on African harvest celebrations. Created in 1966 by Maulana (Ron) Karenga, now chairman of black studies at California State University in Long Beach, Kwanzaa, which lasts from Dec. 26 to Jan. 1, comes from the Swahili phrase matunde ya kwanza , meaning "first fruits of the harvest."
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