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Kwiz Radio Station

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1994 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Greg Ginn began to lease time on radio station KWIZ (96.7) here last July, his principal intentions were to learn how to produce a radio show and to give valuable exposure to artists on his own SST, Cruz and New Alliance record labels. It was a fairly shrewd maneuver considering that virtually all of Ginn's adventurous bands and spoken word artists--a group that includes noise-punk unit Rig, avant-jazz group Bazooka and poet Wanda Coleman--routinely are shunned by commercial radio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | ALAN EYERLY
After a one-year hiatus, Irvine Valley College student Chris Vollentine is bringing his "GayRadio" program back to the airwaves. The variety show will be broadcast from midnight to 1 a.m. Wednesday mornings on KWIZ-FM 96.7 starting this week. The Tustin resident, who calls himself Chris Creem on the radio, said his program will alternate between serious and entertaining topics that are designed to appeal to gays and lesbians of all ages.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First up was a love song with the usual laundry-load of sudsy sentiment and a little lust thrown in for spice. Then came the hourly weather report, promising a day of bright, cloudless skies. Next was a public service announcement, then a traffic update and finally a segue back to the music. It was just a typical morning's programming for KWIZ-FM, 96.7 on the FM dial . . . and it was all in Korean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1994 | BERT ELJERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She expected controversy, but Trang Nguyen was stunned by the organized protests when she started broadcasting interviews with Vietnamese government officials over the airwaves of Orange County's Little Saigon Radio. Since June 20, the fledgling Vietnamese-language radio station in Santa Ana has been airing the interviews with Communist leaders conducted by the British Broadcasting Corp. Nguyen said she believed broadcasting them was a service to the Vietnamese American community.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1993 | Anne Michaud / Times staff writer
Back in Business: A locally produced program, "Consumer Business Radio," is scheduled to return to the air with KWIZ-FM in Pasadena for a 26-week run. The program, to be broadcast during prime commuting hours of 3 to 5 p.m., quizzes local business people about their specialties. A patent attorney or time study specialist, for example, will be invited to solve business problems, producer Barry Allen said. Specialists often pay for the opportunity to be on the show, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1991 | JON NALICK
Sandwiched between songs on a local radio station's weekday morning show, an unusual public service announcement is now airing that encourages parents countywide to get their children to school. As part of an innovative program launched last week to improve school attendance, Spanish contemporary music station KWIZ, 1480 AM, is running the 25-second announcements telling parents that "education is the key to your child's future," and "please send your child to school every day."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | ALAN EYERLY
After a one-year hiatus, Irvine Valley College student Chris Vollentine is bringing his "GayRadio" program back to the airwaves. The variety show will be broadcast from midnight to 1 a.m. Wednesday mornings on KWIZ-FM 96.7 starting this week. The Tustin resident, who calls himself Chris Creem on the radio, said his program will alternate between serious and entertaining topics that are designed to appeal to gays and lesbians of all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Gay Radio," a locally produced, weekly gay-oriented program, will make its debut March 6 over commercial radio station KWIZ 96.7 FM, which broadcasts throughout Orange County. The program will run Saturdays from 7 to 9 p.m., followed by an "After Hours" installment, also weekly, from 1:30 to 3:30 a.m. It will feature news, interviews with prominent homosexuals and lesbians, segments on entertainment, such issues as AIDS, legal and financial matters, some music and listener call-ins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1990 | MARY HELEN BERG
KWIZ radio, which had until today to solve interference problems caused by its antenna, has successfully addressed the complaints of residents and will continue to broadcast from a hillside in Orange. In August, the City Council ordered the station to deal with the complaints or risk losing the conditional use permit that allowed it to broadcast from the western slope of Crawford Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1990 | MARY HELEN BERG
When Barbara Stutheit sits down to play her electric organ, its speakers blare the soft rock tunes of Fleetwood Mac, Phil Collins and Whitney Houston. Stutheit, an artist, is not being visited by a soft rock muse. The nonstop pop she hears through the amplifier of her double-keyboard instrument is courtesy of KWIZ radio. Like many in East Orange, Stutheit has a gripe with KWIZ, located on the radio dial at 96.7 FM in English and 1480 AM in Spanish.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1994 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Greg Ginn began to lease time on radio station KWIZ (96.7) here last July, his principal intentions were to learn how to produce a radio show and to give valuable exposure to artists on his own SST, Cruz and New Alliance record labels. It was a fairly shrewd maneuver considering that virtually all of Ginn's adventurous bands and spoken word artists--a group that includes noise-punk unit Rig, avant-jazz group Bazooka and poet Wanda Coleman--routinely are shunned by commercial radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1993 | DE TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In hopes of catching the ears of some of the 100,000-plus Vietnamese-Americans living in the Southland, Little Saigon Radio Broadcasting today begins a daily nine-hour broadcast of Vietnamese-language programming over KWIZ-FM (96.7). The mix of music and talk programming, the most extensive Vietnamese-language broadcast in Southern California, will air each weekday beginning at 6 a.m.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1993 | Anne Michaud / Times staff writer
Back in Business: A locally produced program, "Consumer Business Radio," is scheduled to return to the air with KWIZ-FM in Pasadena for a 26-week run. The program, to be broadcast during prime commuting hours of 3 to 5 p.m., quizzes local business people about their specialties. A patent attorney or time study specialist, for example, will be invited to solve business problems, producer Barry Allen said. Specialists often pay for the opportunity to be on the show, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Gay Radio," a locally produced, weekly gay-oriented program, will make its debut March 6 over commercial radio station KWIZ 96.7 FM, which broadcasts throughout Orange County. The program will run Saturdays from 7 to 9 p.m., followed by an "After Hours" installment, also weekly, from 1:30 to 3:30 a.m. It will feature news, interviews with prominent homosexuals and lesbians, segments on entertainment, such issues as AIDS, legal and financial matters, some music and listener call-ins.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Wally George, host of the liberal-baiting talk show "Hot Seat" on Anaheim's KDOC-TV Channel 56 (Saturdays at 11 p.m., and in syndication Monday through Friday at 4:30), will begin a new morning radio talk show Jan. 4 on KWIZ-FM (96.7). "Wally George's Great American Radio Show" will air weekdays from 10 to 11 a.m. The host had a radio show of the same title that started on KLAC in 1986 and ran for five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1991 | JON NALICK
Sandwiched between songs on a local radio station's weekday morning show, an unusual public service announcement is now airing that encourages parents countywide to get their children to school. As part of an innovative program launched last week to improve school attendance, Spanish contemporary music station KWIZ, 1480 AM, is running the 25-second announcements telling parents that "education is the key to your child's future," and "please send your child to school every day."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990 | MARY HELEN BERG
Representatives of radio station KWIZ assured the Orange City Council this week that they are addressing community complaints of interference problems caused by signals from the station's antenna in East Orange. Last month, after residents complained that they could hear KWIZ's pop rock through their telephones, televisions and tape decks, the council ordered the station to clear up the complaints by Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recently, a local Korean radio program raised $38,000 in two days to help defray the medical expenses of a 16-year-old Korean immigrant with leukemia. "People called the station and gave $20, $10," said Daniel J. Oh, executive director of marketing for Radio Korea U.S.A.. "I think the money came from about 1,000 people. Those are the numbers which are impressive." Also impressive are the number of Southern California radio stations that have taken on a Korean format.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First up was a love song with the usual laundry-load of sudsy sentiment and a little lust thrown in for spice. Then came the hourly weather report, promising a day of bright, cloudless skies. Next was a public service announcement, then a traffic update and finally a segue back to the music. It was just a typical morning's programming for KWIZ-FM, 96.7 on the FM dial . . . and it was all in Korean.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recently, a local Korean radio program raised $38,000 in two days to help defray the medical expenses of a 16-year-old Korean immigrant with leukemia. "People called the station and gave $20, $10," said Daniel J. Oh, executive director of marketing for Radio Korea U.S.A.. "I think the money came from about 1,000 people. Those are the numbers which are impressive." Also impressive are the number of Southern California radio stations that have taken on a Korean format.
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