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L A Connection Comedy Troupe

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1987 | ZAN DUBIN
Since a preliminary roster was released last month, an additional 150 artists and arts groups have signed up to take part in the Fringe Festival/Los Angeles in September, bringing the total to some 400 events presented by about 325 local art organizations and artists. "It's going to be twice as big as I thought it would be," Fringe Festival director Aaron Paley said Wednesday. Paley predicted in March that the festival would encompass 200 events.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
New first-run movie theaters may be popping up all over. But the box-office boom isn't likely to rescue Southern California's rapidly disappearing single-screen art and repertory movie houses. Since the revival peak of the 1970s and early 1980s, many ornate old picture palaces have closed down or switched from repertory to mainstream movies. In Los Angeles alone, their number has shrunk from 13 to seven in less than a decade.
MAGAZINE
June 27, 2004 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD
It was "Mad Movie" night at Cinespace, the Hollywood cinema-restaurant-lounge hybrid, and the L.A. Connection comedy troupe was spoofing the 1958 immortal sci-fi/horror classic "The Blob," dubbing in its own dialogue as the movie was being played. The group has performed numerous "Blob" riffs, including a talking-Blob spoof available on DVD as "Blobbermouth." This time around, the troupe had the Blob vying with the film's star, Steve McQueen, for a gig as a standup comic on "The Tonight Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1988 | KEVIN BRASS
In 1966, during the pre-staging phase of his film career, Woody Allen took a cheap Japanese action film and made over its sound track with some very clever, very irrelevant and very funny dialogue of his own and called the movie "What's Up Tiger Lily?" Two decades later, the L.A. Connection comedy troupe has turned the technique into an art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1994 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine a version of the film "The Blob" where the amorphous alien comes to Earth not as a hostile invader, but as a Henny Youngman-type comedian looking for a gig on "The Tonight Show." Or, how about a movie featuring Cyrano de Bergerac as a hard-luck fellow whose limited job skills reduce him to punching out the holes in doughnuts with his oversized schnoz. No, these aren't old Mel Brooks screenplays that never reached fruition. Rather, they are multimedia presentations by the L.A.
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