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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Lula Washington's importance to the local dance community can't be overestimated when considering her achievements as organizer, teacher, company leader and the creative force behind an ever-evolving inner-city center. Unfortunately, that creative force can't be glimpsed in her choreography. Looking at the six-part performance by her L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Lula Washington's importance to the local dance community can't be overestimated when considering her achievements as organizer, teacher, company leader and the creative force behind an ever-evolving inner-city center. Unfortunately, that creative force can't be glimpsed in her choreography. Looking at the six-part performance by her L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lucky for L.A. Contemporary Dance Theatre, the company was on the verge of losing its studio. In 1989, Lula Washington, artistic director of the modern dance company, and her husband and company executive director, Erwin Washington, purchased the building--a crumbling former Masonic Lodge on Adams Boulevard in South-Central Los Angeles that they had rented since 1982--to save it from the wrecker's ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lucky for L.A. Contemporary Dance Theatre, the company was on the verge of losing its studio. In 1989, Lula Washington, artistic director of the modern dance company, and her husband and company executive director, Erwin Washington, purchased the building--a crumbling former Masonic Lodge on Adams Boulevard in South-Central Los Angeles that they had rented since 1982--to save it from the wrecker's ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Dancer-choreographer Lula Washington says she has two months to come up with $225,000 to buy the mid-city Masonic Temple that her L.A. Contemporary Dance Theatre has been renting as a studio--or she's out in the streets. Even if Washington can meet these demands, it will cost her an additional $150,000 to bring the structure up to earthquake codes. Washington and her family have refinanced their own home to help secure loans for the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ailey Funeral Set in L.A.: Funeral services for choreographer Alvin Ailey will be held at 7 p.m. in Artesia Tuesday at First Baptist Church of Artesia, 18400 Grayland Ave. In lieu of flowers, contributions should be sent to the Alvin Ailey Scholarship Fund, 211 W. 61st St., New York, N.Y. Ailey, founder of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, died in New York Dec. 1. An Alvin Ailey memorial program is being planned for 8 p.m. Wednesday (at the Inner City Cultural Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
Icons of refinement began each half of the Saturday program in the "Black Choreographers Moving Toward the 21st Century" festival at the Wadsworth Theatre. First came San Francisco Ballet principal Christopher Boatwright, dancing Alonzo King's "Prayer" (music by Al Koran Alkarin) with his customary nobility and a superb mastery of all the solo's surprising inversions and enhancements of classical style. Later on, L.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Lula Washington has choreographed some pretty fancy footwork in her career, but efforts to continue her business after it was devastated by the recent earthquake have required all the creative energy she can muster. "It's been pretty crazy," Washington said. "I've had to get through a lot of red tape. But at least now I know I can get funds to rebuild." Washington's L.A. Contemporary Dance Theatre, in an industrial-style building at 5179 W. Adams Blvd.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Lula Washington has choreographed some pretty fancy footwork in her career, but the daily efforts to continue her business after it was devastated by the recent earthquake have lately required all the creative energy she can muster. "It's been pretty crazy," Washington said. "I've had to get through a lot of red tape. But at least now I know I can get funds to rebuild." Washington's L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
Twyla Tharp disbanded her company. Mark Morris moved to Brussels. The Joffrey Ballet traded away its fall repertory season in Los Angeles. But 1988 was still a year of hope and achievement in dance--especially, for once, on the local scene. This was the year the Los Angeles City Council at last recognized that support from the private sector just wasn't enough. On Nov. 22, it approved the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Dancer-choreographer Lula Washington says she has two months to come up with $225,000 to buy the mid-city Masonic Temple that her L.A. Contemporary Dance Theatre has been renting as a studio--or she's out in the streets. Even if Washington can meet these demands, it will cost her an additional $150,000 to bring the structure up to earthquake codes. Washington and her family have refinanced their own home to help secure loans for the effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995 | LEILA COBO-HANLON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is a unique institution located in a most unlikely setting. Nestled on the banks of the lake at Lincoln Park, its whitewashed walls and tiled floor sharing the space with the ducks and the boathouse, Plaza de la Raza looks like an oasis.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | MARTIN A. DAVID
"America's a racist country," says Texas-born choreographer and arts administrator Halifu Osumare. But in the coming epoch, she says, the nation will finally begin to live up to its own principles of cultural diversity--"to put up or shut up."
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