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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
By successfully treating a little-known disorder that is often misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy, researchers are gaining valuable insight into an entire class of chronic neurologic conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The disease, known as Segawa's dystonia, may afflict as many as 10,000 people in the United States but often goes unrecognized. Like cerebral palsy, the crippling disorder is marked by tremors and rigidity.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
By successfully treating a little-known disorder that is often misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy, researchers are gaining valuable insight into an entire class of chronic neurologic conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The disease, known as Segawa's dystonia, may afflict as many as 10,000 people in the United States but often goes unrecognized. Like cerebral palsy, the crippling disorder is marked by tremors and rigidity.
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SPORTS
July 16, 1987 | From Associated Press
Muhammad Ali suffers from Parkinson's syndrome because of injuries to the brain he sustained during his 22-year boxing career, his doctor said Wednesday. During his 61-bout career, the three-time heavyweight champion often boasted that his face was still pretty and unmarred by the head blows landed by Joe Frazier, George Foreman, Leon Spinks, Larry Holmes and others. Nevertheless, damage was occurring inside, where it was not apparent, according to Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2012 | By Tim O'Neil
William S. Knowles, a retired Monsanto Co. organic chemist who shared a Nobel Prize in 2001 for helping to solve a vexing problem in the manufacture of medicines, died Wednesday of complications of ALS at his home in the St. Louis suburb of Chesterfield, Mo. He was 95. Knowles shared the 2001 Nobel Prize in chemistry with two other scientists, K. Barry Sharpless of the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla and Ryoji Noyori of Nagoya University...
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Damage to the brains of victims of Parkinson's disease, when symptoms are first detected, may not be as severe as physicians had once thought, researchers said here Wednesday. The damage is confined to the brain's putamen, which controls muscle functions, said neurologist E. Stephen Garnett of Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals in Hamilton, Canada.
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