Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsL Ermitage Restaurant
IN THE NEWS

L Ermitage Restaurant

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
July 18, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
Restaurant dining in Los Angeles took a giant step forward when the late Jean Bertranou opened L'Ermitage 16 years ago. It's come to epitomize fine dining in this city, and the restaurant's closing last week was a surprise to Los Angeles diners. It was also, it turns out, a surprise to its chef, Michel Blanchet. Blanchet, who had been with the restaurant since its opening, says the decision was a bit unexpected.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
April 7, 2002 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
Hotel restaurants have it tough. Locals generally avoid them because most are stuffy, overpriced and rarely exciting. Hotel guests don't particularly want to eat in either, unless they don't know a soul in town or are completely unadventurous. If you come to L.A., you want a place where you'll see the life of the city--as well as eat better. That makes the remake of the restaurant at Raffles L'Ermitage, the Beverly Hills luxury hotel, all the more remarkable.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L'Ermitage, for 16 years a favorite restaurant of Los Angeles' well-heeled, movie industry crowd, is up for sale--shut down in the face of management fatigue. Dora Fourcade, who with her brother, Jean-Pierre, has owned the posh West Hollywood eatery since 1986, said Monday that the restaurant had been doing steady business. But the siblings decided to sell because she was becoming overwhelmed dividing her time between the restaurant and her young children.
FOOD
July 18, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
Restaurant dining in Los Angeles took a giant step forward when the late Jean Bertranou opened L'Ermitage 16 years ago. It's come to epitomize fine dining in this city, and the restaurant's closing last week was a surprise to Los Angeles diners. It was also, it turns out, a surprise to its chef, Michel Blanchet. Blanchet, who had been with the restaurant since its opening, says the decision was a bit unexpected.
MAGAZINE
April 7, 2002 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
Hotel restaurants have it tough. Locals generally avoid them because most are stuffy, overpriced and rarely exciting. Hotel guests don't particularly want to eat in either, unless they don't know a soul in town or are completely unadventurous. If you come to L.A., you want a place where you'll see the life of the city--as well as eat better. That makes the remake of the restaurant at Raffles L'Ermitage, the Beverly Hills luxury hotel, all the more remarkable.
FOOD
April 20, 1995 | KATHIE JENKINS
Michel Blanchet has been smoking salmon for years, and he just keeps getting better at it. The chef who ran the kitchen at the revered L'Ermitage restaurant until it closed four years ago and then moved to the Beverly Hilton's L'Escoffier until it also folded, now smokes his fish at a commercial kitchen in East Los Angeles. Citrus, Drai's, the Ritz-Carlton, the Regent Hotel, Le Chardonnay and Moustache Cafe are all regular customers.
MAGAZINE
December 16, 1990 | RUSS PARSONS
CHAMPAGNE, CAVIAR and silky, smoked salmon are the little black dress and pearls of luxurious entertaining. The caviar and the bubbly are easy to get, but finding that perfect piece of smoked salmon can be tricky. Now, just in time for the holidays, there's smoked salmon, one of L'Ermitage's signature dishes, which is made at the restaurant in a custom-built cold-smoker.
FOOD
July 25, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
John-Pierre Bosc, who left Fennel to replace long-time La Serre chef John-Pierre Peiny just three months ago, is gone again. "We, the owner and I, did not have the same objective. My cooking style wasn't what he wanted for LaSerre." "It just didn't work out," said a LaSerre spokesman. "But we have two sous-chefs (Jose Noel and David D'Amore) with enormous experience, who will act as co-chefs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | LAURIE OCHOA
The Rolls-Royces are back in front of what used to be L'Ermitage, a restaurant that during its heyday in the late '70s and early '80s sometimes looked more like a used luxury-car lot than a place to eat. Some of the old faces are back too--there are L'Orangerie's Gerard Ferry and Patrick Terrail from the old Ma Maison, checking out the scene. In the kitchen is Claude Segal, a chef who helped shape the direction of L.A. cuisine in the early '80s.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
While Paris shoots off fireworks in honor of the 200th birthday of Bastille Day, in Los Angeles Consul General Gerard Coste will open the Bicentenaire de la Revolution Francaise on Friday evening with the Bal Populaire at Perloff Quad at UCLA. Traditional French 18th-Century dancing and music will mix with a midnight laser fireworks show ($10). The same evening, Elizabeth Carr Tierney chairs the Newport Harbor Art Museum's "Liberte! Egalite! Fraternite!"
BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L'Ermitage, for 16 years a favorite restaurant of Los Angeles' well-heeled, movie industry crowd, is up for sale--shut down in the face of management fatigue. Dora Fourcade, who with her brother, Jean-Pierre, has owned the posh West Hollywood eatery since 1986, said Monday that the restaurant had been doing steady business. But the siblings decided to sell because she was becoming overwhelmed dividing her time between the restaurant and her young children.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
And the glory of the Garden . . . it shall never pass away. --Rudyard Kipling And, it hasn't. Friends of Robinson Gardens enjoyed the glory of the foxgloves and the Bonica roses and rosemary hedges--and the arbors and walkways and even the lemon trees--on their meanderings through six unique gardens during the magnificent inaugural garden tour put together by Donna Wolff and Bridget Martens. Months before the fund-raising event ($70,000 net), Bridget Martens raved over lunch at the Bistro Garden, "This will be wonderful--w-o-n-d-e-r-ful."
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | BETTY GOODWIN
The evening began with the French way of greeting, hellos followed by a flurry of kisses on both sides of the cheeks. The French also have their way of putting on a dinner party, which was really what Sunday night's festivities were all about. The dinner laid to rest the theory that too many cooks spoil the consomme. Michel Richard of Citrus, Jean-Claude Bourlier of Le Dome, Patrick Healy from Champagne, Claude Alrivy from Le Chardonnay and Michel Blanchet from L'Ermitage toiled together in Blanchet's kitchen preparing a five-course meal--the caloric count of which, one guest pointed out, was "off the wall."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|