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L Ewing Scott

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1987 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
The courtroom scene seemed to be lifted straight from an old Perry Mason script: During the trial of L. Ewing Scott for the murder of his wealthy wife, Evelyn, who had disappeared from their Bel-Air home, his lawyer argued that no body had been found and that the victim "might walk through this courtroom door at any minute." "A-ha," he said as the jurors looked expectantly toward the open doorway. "That shows you are not convinced 'beyond a reasonable doubt' that she is dead."
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NEWS
August 26, 1987 | TED THACKREY JR., Times Staff Writer
The body of L. Ewing Scott, whose conviction three decades ago for the murder of his wealthy socialite wife was California's first successful "no body" prosecution, lay unclaimed at the Los Angeles County Morgue Tuesday--more than a week after his death. He left no survivors. And he was penniless. A spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County public administrator said Scott, 91, died Aug. 17 at the Skyline Convalescent Hospital in Silverlake, where he resided after becoming too feeble to live alone.
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NEWS
August 26, 1987 | TED THACKREY JR., Times Staff Writer
The body of L. Ewing Scott, whose conviction three decades ago for the murder of his wealthy socialite wife was California's first successful "no body" prosecution, lay unclaimed at the Los Angeles County Morgue Tuesday--more than a week after his death. He left no survivors. And he was penniless. A spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County public administrator said Scott, 91, died Aug. 17 at the Skyline Convalescent Hospital in Silverlake, where he resided after becoming too feeble to live alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1987 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
The courtroom scene seemed to be lifted straight from an old Perry Mason script: During the trial of L. Ewing Scott for the murder of his wealthy wife, Evelyn, who had disappeared from their Bel-Air home, his lawyer argued that no body had been found and that the victim "might walk through this courtroom door at any minute." "A-ha," he said as the jurors looked expectantly toward the open doorway. "That shows you are not convinced 'beyond a reasonable doubt' that she is dead."
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gene Blake, a widely respected legal affairs reporter whose byline graced The Times for more than 40 years, died Thursday of liver cancer. He was 75. Blake died at his Port Hueneme retirement home only a week after his terminal illness was diagnosed, said his wife of 54 years, Dorothy. The veteran reporter, who retired in 1985, shared a staff Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Watts riots in 1965. He also garnered awards from the State Bar of California, the Los Angeles County Bar Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1986 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Longtime Los Angeles lawyer Al Matthews, whose clients included convicted killers Barbara Graham, L. Ewing Scott and Fred Stroble in sensational court cases of the 1950s, died Wednesday in Yuba City. He was 79. Matthews' niece, Joan Wilson, said Matthews suffered a stroke in February. He had been living in the Northern California community since last year.
NEWS
February 8, 1986 | DAVID JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
L. Ewing Scott, after three decades of denying that he killed his socialite wife and after spending 21 years behind bars for her murder, reportedly has confessed the crime to a Los Angeles writer. Now 90 and bedridden in a Silverlake area convalescent home, the central figure in what was one of Los Angeles' more sensational cases of the 1950s is quoted in a new book as saying he bludgeoned Evelyn Throsby Scott, 63, to death in the couple's Bel-Air home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Most know Steve Cooley as Los Angeles County's district attorney. But the Los Angeles native also is a history buff, and his collection of memorabilia has turned part of his office suite into a museum of sorts. The three floors near the top of the Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Building in downtown Los Angeles, domain of the district attorney's office, house a cache of mementos, evidence from prominent trials and even artwork.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1985 | LARRY GORDON, Times Staff Writer
Authorities are preparing to try a Burbank man in the alleged sexual kidnaping of a woman who may be a prostitute, who has not filed a complaint and whose identity is not known. A court ruling last month permitting the rare legal action was made by a Pasadena judge against Paul David Sanchez, 40. The ruling was made on the strength of eyewitness reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997 | Steve Harvey
Jane Miller of San Diego sent along a bill from the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla that was headed: "A MAJOR ARTERY HAS RE-OPENED!" "Kind of scary," she commented, "especially if you'd had cardiovascular surgery." And what is the "major artery"? The bill explained: "Construction on North Torrey Pines Road and Genesee Avenue is finally finished . . . " One more reminder that every event in Southern California has a traffic angle.
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