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BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | LANCE IGNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the existing Bonwit Teller specialty retail chain will be closed, including the flagship store in Manhattan, under an agreement announced in bankruptcy court Wednesday. A group of investors, including Donald J. Trump and a shopping mall developer, that won rights to the Bonwit Teller name paid $22 million for five of Bonwit Teller's 16 stores, including the outlet in Manhattan's Trump Tower. The sale was approved by the federal bankruptcy court overseeing the Chapter 11 filing by L. J.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | From United Press International
Bankrupt L. J. Hooker Corp. said Friday that it has reached an agreement to sell five of its Bonwit Teller specialty retail stores to a subsidiary of Pyramid Cos., a real estate development and investment company. Terms of the agreement with Syracuse, N.Y.-based Pyramid were not disclosed. The sale is subject to approval by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court. L. J. Hooker and all its subsidiaries, including Bonwit Teller, filed for protection under federal bankruptcy law in August.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | LANCE IGNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the existing Bonwit Teller specialty retail chain will be closed, including the flagship store in Manhattan, under an agreement announced in bankruptcy court Wednesday. A group of investors, including Donald J. Trump and a shopping mall developer, that won rights to the Bonwit Teller name paid $22 million for five of Bonwit Teller's 16 stores, including the outlet in Manhattan's Trump Tower. The sale was approved by the federal bankruptcy court overseeing the Chapter 11 filing by L. J.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
L. J. Hooker Corp., which tried unsuccessfully to sell its B. Altman & Co. department store chain, on Thursday said it wants to find buyers for two other retailers, Bonwit Teller and Sakowitz. The proposed sale of Bonwit Teller reverses Hooker's previous plan to retain the century-old 16-store upscale chain.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Sanford C. Sigoloff, the peripatetic turnaround artist who rescued Wickes Cos. only to surrender the company to new owners four years later, on Wednesday took over management of L. J. Hooker Corp.'s troubled U.S. retail chains. The announcement was made as the U.S. unit of Australia-based Hooker Corp. filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. L. J. Hooker operates about 100 specialty apparel and jewelry stores that last year had sales of $550 million.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | From United Press International
Bankrupt L. J. Hooker Corp. said Friday that it has reached an agreement to sell five of its Bonwit Teller specialty retail stores to a subsidiary of Pyramid Cos., a real estate development and investment company. Terms of the agreement with Syracuse, N.Y.-based Pyramid were not disclosed. The sale is subject to approval by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court. L. J. Hooker and all its subsidiaries, including Bonwit Teller, filed for protection under federal bankruptcy law in August.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | DAVID D'ARCY, Darcy covers the arts for National Public Radio.
On a rainy January day, the Italianate palazzo that houses what is left of the B. Altman & Co. department store stands as an anomaly. Surrounded by blocks of discount shoe shops, Korean import-export firms and cut-rate rug merchants, it represents a more gracious era in Fifth Avenue retailing history when taste was conservative, service was a top priority and the atmosphere was refined. Indeed, the old B. Altman was a model shopping experience with a national reputation.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
L. J. Hooker Corp., which tried unsuccessfully to sell its B. Altman & Co. department store chain, on Thursday said it wants to find buyers for two other retailers, Bonwit Teller and Sakowitz. The proposed sale of Bonwit Teller reverses Hooker's previous plan to retain the century-old 16-store upscale chain.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Before Sanford C. Sigoloff took on a new turnaround assignment this week at L. J. Hooker Corp., he talked things over with the men he affectionately calls Zephyr, Earth Communicator, Abacus and Baud Man. They are four of the key associates who have stood by Sigoloff through thick and thin, nicknamed after the Flash Gordon comic book characters who loyally served their leader, Ming the Merciless (Sigoloff's nickname). Seven months since they were last together at Santa Monica-based Wickes Cos.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | DAVID D'ARCY, Darcy covers the arts for National Public Radio.
On a rainy January day, the Italianate palazzo that houses what is left of the B. Altman & Co. department store stands as an anomaly. Surrounded by blocks of discount shoe shops, Korean import-export firms and cut-rate rug merchants, it represents a more gracious era in Fifth Avenue retailing history when taste was conservative, service was a top priority and the atmosphere was refined. Indeed, the old B. Altman was a model shopping experience with a national reputation.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Before Sanford C. Sigoloff took on a new turnaround assignment this week at L. J. Hooker Corp., he talked things over with the men he affectionately calls Zephyr, Earth Communicator, Abacus and Baud Man. They are four of the key associates who have stood by Sigoloff through thick and thin, nicknamed after the Flash Gordon comic book characters who loyally served their leader, Ming the Merciless (Sigoloff's nickname). Seven months since they were last together at Santa Monica-based Wickes Cos.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Sanford C. Sigoloff, the peripatetic turnaround artist who rescued Wickes Cos. only to surrender the company to new owners four years later, on Wednesday took over management of L. J. Hooker Corp.'s troubled U.S. retail chains. The announcement was made as the U.S. unit of Australia-based Hooker Corp. filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. L. J. Hooker operates about 100 specialty apparel and jewelry stores that last year had sales of $550 million.
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