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L Kenneth Richardson

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1994
With reference to "Forget Jelly, George Is Jammin' " (by Patrick Pacheco, Nov. 20) and "It's a Public With a Punch" (by Laurie Winer, Nov. 27), I would like to correct a now-common misconception. While George C. Wolfe is indeed a writer and a director, he did not direct the stage production of his play "The Colored Museum" at New York's Public Theater in 1986. The director was L. Kenneth Richardson, then-artistic director of the Crossroads Theatre Company in New Jersey, where the play had its world premiere under Richardson's direction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"The Colored Museum," "Checkmates," "De Obeah Mon" and "The Gospel Truth" were the big winners Monday night, as the Beverly Hills/Hollwood chapter of the NAACP presented its second annual Theatre Awards to a near-capacity crowd at USC's Bing Theater. Sequins, furs (for men and women) and a pervading atmosphere of good will set the tone for the evening, as 24 awards were presented by the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People chapter to a variety of plays staged here last year.
NEWS
December 18, 2003 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
As stuffed as it is with academic chatter and self-important lectures, what "Death: or the Playground" really needs is to go back to school -- playwriting school. Co-writers Dave Jamison and John Cady have a lot on their mind about the meaning of life and the elusiveness of understanding, and they've apparently put all of it onstage, in the mouths of characters who are more paper and ink than flesh and blood.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Boxing, music and wartime patriotic zeal converge in an eloquent, hard-hitting assault on the racial glass ceiling in "Joe Louis Blues" at the Tiffany Theater. Set in 1942 jazz-era Harlem, a turning point ripe with cultural and social possibilities for blacks that would prove tragically unfulfilled, the drama continues playwright Oliver Mayer's ("Blade to the Heat") ongoing fascination with the metaphorical implications of boxing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
On the vast battlefield known as America, a soldier fights for his life. He is Pvt. Battle, whose name describes his state of being in "Private Battle." Vivid, sexy, provocative and harrowing, this drama -- which playwright Lynn Manning has updated for a presentation by Watts Village Theater Company -- takes a long, hard look at our fraying social fabric. Like "Woyzeck," the Georg Buchner drama that inspired it, "Private Battle" is a tragedy driven by social position and surroundings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1997 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It takes guts to pen an autobiographical musical at 36, especially when you're not a star in the People magazine sort of way. But diminutive Ren Woods didn't become a film, television, theater and recording artist by being shy about her talents or abilities. And by the end of her world premiere, "A Diva Like Me: Ren Woods in Concert," at the San Diego Repertory Theatre, it's clear she has a great story to tell.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The story of undefeated heavyweight champ Joe Louis is perceived as one of the great racial breakthroughs of the century. Playwright Oliver Mayer, however, has another perspective. He chooses to show us that in breakthroughs lie the same old racial attitudes: the same pain, same exploitation, same sad blues. And he makes his point with as much license as agility in his unfinished "Joe Louis Blues."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
People didn't want to go home after "The Colored Museum" at the Mark Taper Forum Wednesday. This is a show to talk about, fight about and drag your friends to--and not just your black friends. Being black is what it's about, of course--whatever that means. (Playwright George C. Wolfe doesn't want to define it: too limiting.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | BRETT MAHONEY
Tired of too many "singing and dancing minstrel shows," director L. Kenneth Richardson worked with the Mark Taper Forum to create an African American playwrights workshop so he could see truthful depictions of blacks on stage. Formed in August and called the Blacksmyths, the workshop's purpose is to nurture, support and develop the works of black writers. Richardson sees the workshop as an opportunity to tear down the stereotypical images presented by many mainstream playwrights.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY
Charles Dillingham's first challenge in his new job as managing director of Center Theatre Group may well be to save $1 million. The recent shortfall in fund raising for the Music Center's Unified Fund will lead to cutbacks at all of the center's resident groups, and the CTG--which programs the Mark Taper Forum and the Ahmanson seasons--is no exception. "We face a potential $1-million cut in this year's (planned $4.4-million) allocation," said the CTG's Gordon Davidson.
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