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L Ling Chi Wang

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of his admirers calls him a Chinese Martin Luther King. Another describes him as a visionary and a warrior who runs at full gallop without losing his balance. He's a respected professor and an uncompromising community activist. And a Princeton Theological Seminary graduate who sings Negro spirituals. And an accomplished French chef. He owns one suit and sports a perennial crew cut because "I consider combing my hair and polishing my shoes a waste of time."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of his admirers calls him a Chinese Martin Luther King. Another describes him as a visionary and a warrior who runs at full gallop without losing his balance. He's a respected professor and an uncompromising community activist. And a Princeton Theological Seminary graduate who sings Negro spirituals. And an accomplished French chef. He owns one suit and sports a perennial crew cut because "I consider combing my hair and polishing my shoes a waste of time."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gearing up for a Sept. 8 protest against Japan, Asian American human rights groups in Los Angeles on Friday urged Japan to admit its World War II atrocities, issue a formal apology and make reparations to the victims. Without coming to terms with its wartime past, Japan will not enjoy credibility in the community of nations, said Robert Tsang of the Alliance for Preserving the Truth of the Sino-Japanese War, whose family came from Manchuria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's nice to know that Chinese is finally being accepted," said Alhambra High School junior Gary Chen as he prepared to join more than 3,000 students nationwide on Tuesday in tackling the College Board's first test to measure proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. Chen, 16, a Chinese American, has studied Mandarin at his school for the past three years. He will be among about 250 students from the heavily Asian Alhambra, Mark Keppel and San Gabriel high schools who will take the Chinese exam.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
As news of Wen Ho Lee's impending release from jail reached laboratories across the country, vocal jubilation was tempered by the realization that deep problems plaguing classified weapon research and Asian American scientists will not be solved simply by letting Lee out of his jail cell. "I think it's good news, but I'm not sure the damage is undone," said Robert C.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the office suites of Monterey Park to the holiday-festooned streets of San Francisco's Chinatown, word of the death of Chinese senior leader Deng Xiaoping reverberated with the impact of a titan felled. There may have been little surprise--he had been sick so long, after all--but Deng's death evoked throughout California's vast Chinese community the sort of talk reserved for the truly awesome forces of history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2002 | ERIN CHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just a hypothetical situation, but it showed dead-on what a nonprofit organization called Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics Inc., or LEAP, wants to accomplish. Wearing a buttoned-up business suit that made her look like the well-groomed executive she wanted to imitate, workshop facilitator Audrey Yamagata-Noji whipped back her black hair and strolled up to a conference table of six Asian Americans.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | DON LEE and TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was an electric moment Monday night: a roar rumbled through the crowds surging into an anti-communist rally in Little Saigon as political rivals Thang Ngoc Tran and Duc Trong Do clasped hands. "Fighting communism is the No. 1 goal," Tran would later say. "I shook Duc's hand at that time because we need to unite, put aside our disagreements, and fight communism together."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1999 | DON LEE and TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was an electric moment: A roar rumbled through the crowds surging into an anti-Communist rally in Little Saigon last week as political rivals Thang Ngoc Tran and Duc Trong Do clasped hands. "Fighting communism is the No. 1 goal," Tran would later say. "I shook Duc's hand at that time because we need to unite, put aside our disagreements and fight communism together."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2002 | ERIN CHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Chinese Daily News threatened pay cuts in what it called salary reconstruction, employees' frustration erupted into the unexpected: the formation of a union. The move pleased the AFL-CIO. And to the union federation it was evidence that its efforts to lure Asian Americans are paying off. Even more surprising are recent efforts by Asian American workers to organize in defiance of Asian bosses.
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