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L Orangerie

ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | KATHIE JENKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The star search is over. L'Orangerie's Gerard and Virginie Ferry have finally found a chef to replace Jean-Claude Parachini, who left the deluxe French restaurant more than four months ago. It's Gilles Epie (hey-pee-AY), formerly chef-owner of the one-star Miravile and the more casual Campagne & Provence, and recently food consultant for Lanvin--all in Paris. "It's such a change to deal with somebody who has a sense of reality," says Gerard Ferry. "Most cooks are a pain in the you-know-what.
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MAGAZINE
March 28, 1993 | Ruth Reichl
When a restaurant in France gets its second star from the Guide Michelin, it knows it is time to spend money. The acquisition of the ultimate third star does not mean that the chef has become more talented or that the food is dramatically improved. It mostly means that the restaurant has graduated to a level of almost absurd luxury. One hopeful two-star Paris restaurant even bought a limousine in which to chauffeur customers home at the end of the meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1992 | KATHIE JENKINS
Are changes in the offing for L'Orangerie? According to industry sources, owner Gerard Ferry has sold L.A.'s best--and most expensive--classic French restaurant to a Japanese businessman living in Los Angeles. Ferry, it's said, will continue running the restaurant for two more years as a consultant. "I am not going to talk about it," Ferry says. "Nothing has been finalized."
NEWS
March 30, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: A pre-Oscar fete Friday night at L'Orangerie restaurant. For those who can wrangle an invitation, the dinner, now in its third year, has become a comforting ritual with the focus on diet-defying food and drink and nothing deeper. Harry Winston jewelers and Relais & Chateaux, international restaurant and hotel directory, underwrote the evening. Who Was There: A real cross-section of Hollywood--Billy Wilder, Vincent Spano, Harvey Weinstein, Freddie Fields.
MAGAZINE
May 12, 1991 | Ruth Reichl
"I hate L'Orangerie," the Reluctant Gourmet says lugubriously. "It's so stuffy. Can't we just go somewhere and eat hamburgers?" And so I tell him that the place has, reportedly, changed. There's a new chef, from L'Ambroisie, I say, one of the best restaurants in Paris. The RG yawns. I whip out one of the (many) recent raves about the restaurant and begin reading aloud. I tell him about a piece of prime rib the size of a steak, served with the bone on one side, the marrow on the other.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: It's been held only once before, but, hey, no problem. L'Orangerie's second annual champagne-drenched pre-Oscar fete on Friday night was proclaimed by all a "tradition." In any case, it may be the only party held during Oscar-countdown week where there were no speeches, awards or honorees. Once again, Harry Winston jewelers and Relais & Chateaux, the international restaurant and hotel directory, underwrote the evening.
MAGAZINE
July 1, 1990
Having been a regular at L'Orangerie for some years now, I couldn't believe that it wasn't included amongst Los Angeles' finest. I was even more shocked when Reichl stated: "L'Orangerie offers a gorgeous setting, but the last meal I had there was so disappointing--amateur service, high prices and food that was little more than bistro cooking." I have, to date, never had a bad meal or bad service at the restaurant. MICHAEL CAINE Beverly Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | CHARLES PERRY
Here is L'Orangerie: tiny manicured lawns and orange trees, room after room full of mirrors and fountains and 18th-Century paintings. It's a little bit of Versailles in West Hollywood. Right next door, here's Mark's: a single plain, art gallery-like room decorated with what look like dark abstracts but are actually, so I understand, representational paintings of somebody's back yard (kind of a dark back yard, if you ask me). There's also a dining patio.
NEWS
May 31, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
During the 1952 Olympic Games, Katalin Szoke won two gold medals in swimming for her Hungarian team. Thirty-three years later, now a California resident married to a very successful developer, Arpad Domyan (he was a member of the Hungarian water polo team that also won a gold medal in 1952), Kati was inducted into the Swimming Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., last month. It's all heady stuff and worthy of the kind of party Arpad gave for Kati last weekend.
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