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L Ron Hubbard

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NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Joel Sappell and Robert W. Welkos, Time Staff Writers
L. Ron Hubbard enjoyed being pampered. He surrounded himself with teen-age followers, whom he indoctrinated, treated like servants and cherished as though they were his own children. He called them the "Commodore's messengers." " 'Messenger!' " he would boom in the morning. "And we'd pull him out of bed," one recalled. The youngsters, whose parents belonged to Hubbard's Church of Scientology, would lay out his clothes, run his shower and help him dress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
What do Jesus and Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard have in common? According to authors Reza Aslan and Lawrence Wright, there are indeed commonalities. Fans and avid readers flocked to the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday to hear Aslan and Wright speak during an hourlong panel moderated by Times Editor-in-Chief Davan Maharaj. “You will leave enlightened, I hope,” Maharaj said when introducing the panel. Aslan, author of “Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth,” and Wright, author of “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood & the Prison of Belief,” delved deeper into parallels between the two religious figures featured in their books.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1987 | Associated Press
L. Ron Hubbard, the Scientology founder and author who died last year, left more than $26 million in assets, excluding trust funds, according to documents filed by the executor of his estate. Total assets listed in the inventory amount to $26,305,706. They include "$25 million even" in copyright and trademark materials and $1,305,706 in oil, gas and business investments, said attorney Charles Ogle of Morro Bay. The estate documents were prepared in Los Angeles by Norman F.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Evan Wright, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Who'd have thought a history of a religion would offer so many guilty pleasures? Lawrence Wright's enthralling account of Scientology's rise, "Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief," brims with celebrity scandal. To anyone who gets a sugar rush from Hollywood gossip, the chapters on Tom Cruise and John Travolta will feel like eating a case of Ding Dongs. But celebrities are serious business in Scientology. L. Ron Hubbard, who founded his church in Los Angeles in 1954, recognized their value in attracting followers.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | Associated Press
The once-contested multimillion-dollar estate of Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard has been settled, and control of it was given to the top church official Hubbard had named as executor. Superior Court Judge William R. Fredman on Tuesday ordered the estate turned over to Norman F. Starkey, who besides his position in the church was a longtime friend of Hubbard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversial church that claims Tom Cruise, John Travolta and Priscilla Presley as members now can lay claim to a public street as well, with Tuesday's vote by the Los Angeles City Council to rename a one-block stretch of Berendo Street in Hollywood after L. Ron Hubbard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state education department has given preliminary approval to statewide use of school textbooks inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, which already are at the center of a controversy in Los Angeles schools. Five books based on Hubbard's education ideas are expected to be placed on a list of supplementary texts that schools across the state can purchase--possibly as soon as September, an education official said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state education department has given preliminary approval to statewide use of school textbooks inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard that already are at the center of a controversy in Los Angeles schools. Five books based on Hubbard's education ideas are expected to be placed on a list of supplementary texts that schools across the state can purchase--possibly as soon as September, an education official said Monday.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Joel Sappell and Robert W. Welkos, Time Staff Writers
Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard often said that man's most basic drive is that of survival. And when it came to his own, he used whatever was necessary -- false identities, cover stories, deception. There is no better illustration of this than the way he secretly controlled the Church of Scientology while hiding from a world he viewed as increasingly hostile.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Joel Sappell and Robert W. Welkos, Time Staff Writers
To his followers, L. Ron Hubbard was bigger than life. But it was an image largely of his own making. A Los Angeles Superior Court judge put it bluntly while presiding over a Church of Scientology lawsuit in 1984. Scientology's founder, he said, was "virtually a pathological liar" about his past. Hubbard was an intelligent and well-read man, with diverse interests, experience and expertise. But that apparently was not enough to satisfy him.
MAGAZINE
July 24, 2005 | Dan Neil
I don't believe in god, but my faith in brunch is unshakable. And so, with Scientology drawing headlines if not general approbation on account of Tom Cruise and his obeisant fiancee, Katie Holmes, I thought it might be illuminating to take in the Sunday brunch at Scientology's Celebrity Centre, a cast-concrete chateau in the heart of Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
"Now the sun will shine, "Now we'll be just fine. "We have got the science of the mind." This incessantly reprised refrain fails to convey the analytical anarchy and reactive hysteria that suffuses "A Very Merry Unauthorized Children's Scientology Pageant" at the Powerhouse Theatre. In its West Coast premiere, this Obie-winning paean to the late L. Ron Hubbard and his, um, legacy plays a wee satiric notion to its zenith, with lethally gleeful results.
NEWS
September 23, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State education officials on Monday rejected the latest version of a series of textbooks inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, saying the books failed to properly depict disabled people and minorities. The publisher, Bridge Publications, is seeking to have five books based on Hubbard's educational ideas approved for use in California public classrooms as supplemental texts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal for a charter school featuring the teaching methods of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard has been withdrawn by its primary sponsor for personal reasons, according to her supporters. Linda Smith, a veteran special education teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District and 16-year Church of Scientology member, had hoped to open the Northwest Charter School in the San Fernando Valley this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1997 | RENA WEINBERG, Rena Weinberg is president of the Assn. for Better Living and Education (ABLE), an organization formed to coordinate the use of L. Ron Hubbard's social betterment methods in society
The proposal by a teacher to open a charter school in the Sunland-Tujunga area, one which will include among its textbooks some written by L. Ron Hubbard, has become something of a controversy--which is a pity, because the real issue is so much more important. Whether a controversy actually existed before a couple of Times columnists made their prejudices known is debatable. Certainly, they didn't help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
When it comes to the sensitive issue of selecting textbooks, state education officials try to walk a fine line between making sure that books purchased are not offensive and giving local districts as much leeway as possible to make their own choices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1994
A 600-photo exhibition on the life of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, is open to the public through Aug. 31 at the Church of Scientology in Hollywood. Tours of the "Images of a Lifetime" exhibition are offered from noon to 11:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9:30 a.m. until 11:30 p.m. on weekends. For reservations, (213) 960-3100. The exhibition is sponsored by the Church of Scientology Celebrity Center International. It is at Franklin and Bronson avenues.
MAGAZINE
July 24, 2005 | Dan Neil
I don't believe in god, but my faith in brunch is unshakable. And so, with Scientology drawing headlines if not general approbation on account of Tom Cruise and his obeisant fiancee, Katie Holmes, I thought it might be illuminating to take in the Sunday brunch at Scientology's Celebrity Centre, a cast-concrete chateau in the heart of Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Applied Scholastics International, the Hollywood organization that promotes the teaching methods of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, is spreading its ideas and school textbooks through inner-city communities in a partnership with a Baptist minister from Compton. The company has teamed up with the Rev. Alfreddie Johnson in a grass-roots campaign to bring Hubbard's "Study Technology" to church and community tutoring programs in low-income areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state education department has given preliminary approval to statewide use of school textbooks inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, which already are at the center of a controversy in Los Angeles schools. Five books based on Hubbard's education ideas are expected to be placed on a list of supplementary texts that schools across the state can purchase--possibly as soon as September, an education official said Monday.
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