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L Subramaniam

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September 15, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
Because he wears so many hats, it's hard to know what to expect from a concert by classical Indian violinist L. Subramaniam. He has been known as a jazz musician, as well as a performer in Western and Indian classical styles. In his concert Thursday night for the L.A. Festival, the San Fernando Valley resident opted for a conservative approach in the Carnatic music tradition of South India, performing with a quartet of Indian percussionists at Wadsworth Theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
To the casual listener, classical Indian music may not seem to be all that complicated: a solo instrument--sitar, violin, etc.--playing exotic-sounding scales over a recurrent drone, accompanied by small bursts of percussion. But it's a mistaken impression. And as violinist L. Subramaniam demonstrated in his stirring concert at the Veterans Wadsworth Theater on Saturday, the devil is in the details, which can become exceedingly intricate while remaining irresistibly appealing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
To the casual listener, classical Indian music may not seem to be all that complicated: a solo instrument--sitar, violin, etc.--playing exotic-sounding scales over a recurrent drone, accompanied by small bursts of percussion. But it's a mistaken impression. And as violinist L. Subramaniam demonstrated in his stirring concert at the Veterans Wadsworth Theater on Saturday, the devil is in the details, which can become exceedingly intricate while remaining irresistibly appealing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's common to hear about a musician who is exploring his roots. In the case of India-born violinist L. Subramaniam, those roots run deeper than most. Subramaniam has made a name in this country fusing the traditions of Indian classical music with Western classical tradition as well as with jazz and rock styles. He's played with Yehudi Menuhin and Stephane Grappelli, jammed with George Harrison and improvised with fusionists including saxophonist Tom Scott and keyboardist George Duke.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I was struck by the irony of your editorial announcing a series of issue face-offs on the Op-Ed Page between gubernatorial candidates Dianne Feinstein and Pete Wilson ("Why Not the Best?' Aug. 31). What you failed to mention in your announcement of this effort to foster "intelligent discussion of the issues" is the fact that the candidates who advocate significantly different approaches to those issues were apparently not invited to participate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's common to hear about a musician who is exploring his roots. In the case of India-born violinist L. Subramaniam, those roots run deeper than most. Subramaniam has made a name in this country fusing the traditions of Indian classical music with Western classical tradition as well as with jazz and rock styles. He's played with Yehudi Menuhin and Stephane Grappelli, jammed with George Harrison and improvised with fusionists including saxophonist Tom Scott and keyboardist George Duke.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1999
Many thanks to Don Heckman for his fine article on violinist Regina Carter ("She's Got the World on Four Strings," Sept. 26). I had the great pleasure to see her for the first time at the Monterey Jazz Festival last month and she's absolutely incredible. She obviously was enjoying playing alongside her mentor, Kenny Barron, but halfway through "I Can't Believe That You're in Love With Me," she and guitarist Russell Malone got into a give-and-take pairing that was one of the greatest jazz improvisations I've ever seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The goal of "India in the Air" at the Getty Museum on Saturday night was specific: an exploration of the impact of Karnatic Indian classical music upon contemporary American composers. It was an intriguing, if somewhat esoteric notion, since Indian music generally has had a more visible effect upon pop music and jazz. And the presence on the program of violinist L. Subramaniam, who has frequently worked in American jazz and pop, seemed to underscore that connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
It wasn't a bad idea in principle: a jazz concert billed as "A Fusion of Eastern and Western Music." And the presence of such improvisational notables as violinist L. Subramaniam, saxophonist Ernie Watts, harpist Alice Coltrane, guitarist Larry Carlton and pianist David Benoit, and an interesting musical mix would seem to be in order. Friday night's Royce Hall "Jazz Spectacular," however, only barely managed to deliver as advertised.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
Band leader Woody Herman, baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams and fluegelhornist-composer Shorty Rogers are among jazz luminaries headlining the 18th annual Orange Coast College Jazz Festival Thursday through Sunday at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa. The festival, co-sponsored by the Coast Jazz Society and KLON-FM, Long Beach, will also include competitions among jazz bands from junior high schools, high schools and colleges.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
Because he wears so many hats, it's hard to know what to expect from a concert by classical Indian violinist L. Subramaniam. He has been known as a jazz musician, as well as a performer in Western and Indian classical styles. In his concert Thursday night for the L.A. Festival, the San Fernando Valley resident opted for a conservative approach in the Carnatic music tradition of South India, performing with a quartet of Indian percussionists at Wadsworth Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I was struck by the irony of your editorial announcing a series of issue face-offs on the Op-Ed Page between gubernatorial candidates Dianne Feinstein and Pete Wilson ("Why Not the Best?' Aug. 31). What you failed to mention in your announcement of this effort to foster "intelligent discussion of the issues" is the fact that the candidates who advocate significantly different approaches to those issues were apparently not invited to participate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Potpourri" may be the best word to describe the Global Music Festival at UCLA's Royce Hall on Sunday. Although the presence of violinist L. Subramaniam as the featured artist suggested a concert dedicated to the fusion of jazz and Indian music, the program was actually far more oriented toward a colorful overview of Indian popular music.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
With sitarist Ravi Shankar turning 70 this year, at least one of his birthday parties will be hard to forget. Seven esteemed classical Indian musicians--including Shankar himself--performed with their ensembles Saturday and Sunday at Pasadena City College's Sexson Auditorium, honoring the musician's birthday (April 7) and his 50-year career in an event entitled "Festival '90." The gathering was sponsored by the Music Circle.
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