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L Tryptophan

NEWS
November 16, 1989 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Health Director Kenneth W. Kizer on Wednesday ordered retail merchants to discontinue the sale of L-Tryptophan, an over-the-counter food supplement used for sleeping problems and premenstrual syndrome, which he said may be to blame for 154 cases of a rare blood disorder 22 states.
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NEWS
December 6, 1989 | From United Press International
The Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday it is blocking imports of the medicinal drug L-tryptophan, linked to a nationwide outbreak of a blood disorder that killed at least one person. The action, which started in late November, follows the FDA's nationwide recall of non-prescription supplements of the amino acid used for sleeping disorders, premenstrual syndrome, depression and stress. The FDA said it "imposed an automatic detention at U.S.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | From United Press International
The Food and Drug Administration called late Friday for a nationwide recall of L-tryptophan, an over-the-counter dietary supplement linked to a mysterious blood and muscle ailment. An FDA statement urged consumers to stop using dietary supplements containing L-tryptophan, an amino acid, which is widely available in health food stores, supermarkets and drugstores. The federal action was taken two days after California Health Director Kenneth W.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Suits Against Japanese Firm Allege Poisoning: Dual lawsuits were filed in state and federal court against Showa Denko K.K. of Japan on behalf of roughly 120 people who allege that they or members of their family were poisoned by L-tryptophan, an amino acid that was banned in the United States last April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1993
The FDA is planning to restrict health claims of nutritional supplements such as we find in health food stores and pharmacies. Currently, a vitamin or food supplement can (and frequently does) make healing claims that have absolutely no scientific evidence to support them. Remarkably, the FDA has been able to do nothing to stop this. Why? Because our congressman, Elton Gallegly, authored and pushed successfully a bill to prohibit the FDA from doing the job it should do. He authored a bill that prohibited the FDA from taking stronger steps to protect the public for a one-year period.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Over the summer, the 37-year-old woman had been sail boarding and winning tennis tournaments. Then she began to experience insidious pains in the temples and jaws. Later the pain spread throughout her body. It became so intense that "it hurt to put my sunglasses on," she recalled. Her doctors had found extremely high numbers of the uncommon white blood cell known as the eosinophil in her blood stream.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Identifying impurities in L-tryptophan nutritional supplements associated with the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome has been far easier than learning how to treat those afflicted with the painful and potentially fatal disease. Although new cases of the syndrome have declined precipitously after a nationwide recall of tryptophan products last November, many of those afflicted are still severely ill. Treatment "is still a big black box," said Dr. Joseph Duffy of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
HEALTH
November 21, 2005 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
IT'S a Thanksgiving Day ritual -- lolling around after dinner complaining that the turkey has made you sleepy. This myth (yes, it's a myth) emerges from the fact that turkey contains the amino acid tryptophan, which can play a role in sleep. But to have this effect, tryptophan must be taken on an empty stomach -- and in much higher doses than one can consume in food. It may, however, have another effect. A new study suggests this natural substance may have an effect on the immune system.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a golden rule of nutrition, it is a simple one: Too much of anything is bad for you. Yet, when it comes to amino-acid nutritional supplements, Americans seem to cling more to the creed that if a substance occurs naturally within the human body, one can never have too much of it. That philosophy resulted in the development of an estimated $150-million-a-year market for the amino acid tryptophan in the United States over the last few years.
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