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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | Kate Aurthur
In an interview last July on the Vancouver set of Showtime's soapy lesbian drama "The L Word," actress Mia Kirshner was asked where she imagined her character, Jenny Schecter, would wind up when the series ended its six-season run this winter. The show, after all, began with Jenny's entrance into a glittering, enticing West Hollywood lady scene, as she befriended the other inhabitants of "The L Word" world and soon realized she was a lesbian.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Amanda Hess, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There is so much drama going on in Romi Klinger's life right now. Her ex-girlfriend Whitney is dating her friend Sara, who has brainwashed Whitney into thinking Romi is evil. And Romi is worried what her other friends will do when they find out about Romi's new relationship - with a man. "Lesbians can be really harsh toward women who sleep with men again. It's like, 'What is she doing? Is she a real lesbian?'" Romi asks the camera. It's a question that has serious consequences for her personal and work life, since Romi is a star of "The Real L Word" - the Showtime reality TV series that entered its third season this past week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2004
Why does The Times want to legitimize homosexuality by running a review on the front of the Jan. 9 Calendar section about Showtime's new series "The L Word" ("Looking for Love," by Carina Chocano), and then continue to legitimize this abhorrent behavior with a feature story about the show on Page 46? Doesn't The Times have more edifying things to write about? Do I now have to make sure my 9-year-old daughter doesn't happen to glance at The Times before I do so that she is not exposed to the perversions it may contain?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Without picking a side in the entertaining Republican presidential contest, let us stipulate that Mitt Romney was smack on target when he called Newt Gingrich an influence peddler. A lobbyist? No, not in a legal sense. But did he lobby? Yes, in the common usage of the word. An influence peddler? That pretty much covers it. Many Sacramento lobbyists and their cousin "consultants" got a chuckle out of the fiery Romney-Gingrich exchange in the Jan. 23 Florida debate. There was Romney, pulling out the old pejorative "lobbyist," and the former House speaker resisting it as if he were being called a con man or a pimp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | DEBORAH NETBURN
What it's a good time to talk about: "The L Word." The morose marine layer that engulfed last year's "L Word" lifted this season -- no one died tragically! The Ls bed-hopped, broke up and played basketball, as it should be in Sapphic Los Angeles. This week marks the end of Season 4, but Showtime has already announced that Season 5 is a sure thing. (Tonight) What nobody wants to talk about: Good Charlotte.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2007 | Kate Aurthur, Times Staff Writer
IN 2004, "The L Word" was hailed as a groundbreaking look at the sexed-up lives of lesbians in Los Angeles. Now in its fourth season, the Showtime series' cast has expanded to the point where its women seem to constitute a small city unto themselves. Increasingly, "The L Word's" new additions are well-known actresses who have found themselves outside of the narrow range of options available -- or, rather, not available -- to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Any doubt that "The L Word," Showtime's new series about the lives and loves of a group of young lesbians in Los Angeles, hopes to fill the void left when "Sex and the City" goes off the air in February should be dispelled by the show's tagline: "Same Sex. Different City." Splashed across a glamour shot of eight beautiful women (and one beautiful man), the promotional copy invokes the spirit of its predecessor so plainly, it can take a moment to catch on to the double meaning.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2004 | Laurie K. Schenden, Special to The Times
Jennifer Beals steps gracefully out of a black stretch limo in tuxedo-like slacks and blouse, her long brown hair piled atop her head. It's no surprise that the exotically beautiful actress has an attractive date on her arm -- except that her date happens to be a woman. Beals and Laurel Holloman are shooting a scene for Showtime's new series "The L Word." They play a couple, Bette and Tina, in the first dramatic series to revolve around the lives and loves of lesbians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1988
If President Reagan is labeling us poor Democrats with the "L word"--liberal, liberal, liberal, then it's certainly fitting that his brand of Republican be labeled with the "R word"--reactionary, reactionary, reactionary. NICK NEWTON Laguna Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2004
In responding to Booth Moore's article ("Dressed-Up Diversity," Feb. 8) regarding the "lesbian fashion chic" on display in Showtime's "The L Word," let me say Frye-boot-wearing butches went out when androgyny and Timberlines came in -- sometime in the '80s. Fashion aficionados who think butches have no fashion sense and aren't worthy of television representation are just wrong! In fact, without the few fringe butches on "The L Word," there would be no heat, regardless of how much the girls kiss each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Not enough reality TV in your life? Talk about "The Real L Word." Showtime's new series, a reality spinoff of the network's defunct scripted series "The L Word," revolves around six Los Angeles-based lesbians and their everyday melodrama. Think any one of the "Real Housewives" editions meets "The L Word." (Sunday) If you like '60s fashion , talk about "A Single Man." The film, out on DVD, stars Colin Firth as George Falconer, a gay British university professor living in Southern California in 1962 who is struggling to cope with the death of his partner.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Denise Martin
Katherine Moennig spent the last six years playing sexpot lesbian hairdresser Shane on Showtime's "The L Word." The actress, who happens to be a cousin of Gwyneth Paltrow, is far tamer -- and so is her hair -- in her new role as Dr. Miranda Foster on CBS' medical drama "Three Rivers." Do you miss playing Shane? At this moment, I miss a lot about her. The beauty of that character was her unabashed way of viewing life. She was so unapologetic. She was always deemed the bad girl, and that was always good to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | Kate Aurthur
In an interview last July on the Vancouver set of Showtime's soapy lesbian drama "The L Word," actress Mia Kirshner was asked where she imagined her character, Jenny Schecter, would wind up when the series ended its six-season run this winter. The show, after all, began with Jenny's entrance into a glittering, enticing West Hollywood lady scene, as she befriended the other inhabitants of "The L Word" world and soon realized she was a lesbian.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | DEBORAH NETBURN
What it's a good time to talk about: "The L Word." The morose marine layer that engulfed last year's "L Word" lifted this season -- no one died tragically! The Ls bed-hopped, broke up and played basketball, as it should be in Sapphic Los Angeles. This week marks the end of Season 4, but Showtime has already announced that Season 5 is a sure thing. (Tonight) What nobody wants to talk about: Good Charlotte.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2007 | Kate Aurthur, Times Staff Writer
IN 2004, "The L Word" was hailed as a groundbreaking look at the sexed-up lives of lesbians in Los Angeles. Now in its fourth season, the Showtime series' cast has expanded to the point where its women seem to constitute a small city unto themselves. Increasingly, "The L Word's" new additions are well-known actresses who have found themselves outside of the narrow range of options available -- or, rather, not available -- to them.
NEWS
March 10, 2005 | Robin Rauzi
If you've watched Showtime's "The L Word," now in its second season, you know that Shane -- played by 27-year-old Katherine Moennig -- is the center star in an elaborate constellation of lesbian melodrama. Despite its West Hollywood setting, the series shoots in Vancouver. But now that the show has wrapped filming, Moennig gets to explore Los Angeles, after having moved from New York about two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1992
Whenever I hear the Republican Party call Clinton a liberal, I get so worked up I want to write a letter. The "L" word is a label that hasn't any relevance, and it's only used to invoke some emotional response from the voter. It's an insult to the intelligence of the voting American and indicates their low opinion of us. What they need to do is talk about the issues. This is an important time for us, and what we need is good debate, not name-calling. I've heard the last three years described as the worst since the Depression.
OPINION
July 29, 1990
May we stop congratulating ourselves on the death of communism in the East long enough to acknowledge the utter failure of a political theory much beloved here in the West? I refer to the "trickle-down" theory. For 10 years Reagan and Bush have based American economic policy on the principle that the poor, who must subsist on table scraps dropped by the rich, can best be served by giving the rich bigger meals. This policy has inevitably resulted in a permanent, growing underclass who can scarcely be blamed for demanding their own place at the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2005 | Meghan Daum, Special to the Times
HOW'S this for a parlor game: Which lesbian on 'The L Word' would you most like to sleep with?" It's a question that has begun popping up in certain social circles as women, gay and straight alike, speculate on the relative bedworthiness of the cast of Showtime's groundbreaking drama, which begins its second season tonight.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
Hours before John Edwards took the stage Wednesday, MSNBC's Tim Russert informed viewers that the vice presidential nominee would not be using the words "Bush" or "Cheney" in his speech. But there's another word that's been loitering around the convention coverage -- "liar." It has to do with President Bush and Iraq and the overheated rhetoric encouraged by TV news.
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