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La Cienega

ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1997 | ANGEL PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Meteigner Mellows. Jean Francois Meteigner of La Cachette has decided to go casual. No, La Cachette isn't being taken down a notch. Meteigner is just opening a new place on La Cienega near L'Orangerie, tentatively named Bistro Provencal. It will have a wood-burning pizza oven in the middle of the dining room cranking out tomato-sauceless Provencal versions of the pie. Prices at the new place will be more provincial as well, coming in at under $17 an entree.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1997 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
It seems like just last week 8445 W. 3rd St. (at La Cienega) was playing the part of a funky South American ceviche bar called Antartica. As of last weekend, it has become the state-of-the-art Sushi Roku. I don't see how this place can miss. Two nights out, it is already thronged with the fashion-conscious dressed (or undressed as the case may be) in black and accessorized with tiny eyeglasses, white-blond hair and toned-to-the-max physiques.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1995 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
Someone has finally grabbed up one of the most romantic restaurant spaces in town: the old Florian (and before that Tryst) space on La Cienega. La Cachette manager Yon Idiart plans to open a Provencal restaurant, with a late-night cabaret, called La Madrague, which is the name of Brigitte Bardot's home in St. Tropez. The chef will be Martin Herold, who worked as sous-chef under Jean Francois Meteigner at La Cachette.
NEWS
June 22, 1995
The article about the Hollyhills storm drain project (Westside section, June 4) came as an unhappy shock to me, as I'm sure it did to hundreds of your readers. I'd like to refute a statement in your article credited to "community flood control officials." The officials say that "many main streets on the Westside, including the northern section of La Cienega Boulevard, face severe flooding virtually every time it rains." This is not true for La Cienega. My office has been on La Cienega for 18 years and the northern section has never been even mildly flooded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1994 | SHAWN HUBLER
Attention, Santa Monica Freeway commuters. We interrupt your honking and cheering with a word from Dorene Desenberg and her Westside neighborhood. While you are once again whipping in and out of traffic as if the dog days of the detour had never intruded upon your solo commute, it would be worthwhile to note that the freeway's "reopening" was a bit of an exaggeration in some parts of L.A.
NEWS
March 10, 1994
With regard to the detours around the 10 Freeway, I am upset by seemingly pointless and often dangerous interference with traffic by police traffic officers. The worst is the intersection of National at Venice. I commute from Palms, along Palms Boulevard to National, National to La Brea, to the freeway east to work, and back the same way. On the return trip, with no officers messing up the flow, it takes five minutes to proceed from La Cienega to Washington, another five minutes to get up to Robertson and proceed west to Overland.
MAGAZINE
October 3, 1993 | Jonathan Gold
Do appearances count? California's unemployment figures still slouch toward double digits, the austerity thing is still chic, but up on La Cienega Boulevard, the Bentleys are stacked up again, the Benzes triple-parked almost to the double yellow line, because the old L'Ermitage space is back in business as a restaurant called Drai's. It's a hot new place to wear Chanel, and the points-on-the-gross crowd is happy. Baby artichokes reign once again on this edge of Restaurant Row.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County officials said Wednesday that low-lying streets near La Cienega Boulevard--whose name means the swamp in Spanish--may face more flooding if there is a repeat of the deluge of two weeks ago. "What happened a few weeks ago was an overwhelming storm that took everyone by surprise," said Donna Guyovich, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1992 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's scary, man." Warren Montelibano turned silent as he watched the handwriting on the wall--or, more precisely, as he stared at the numbers flashing on the big electronic tote board. Newly situated above one of Los Angeles' busiest street corners, the $75,000, computerized sign burned with two graphic reminders of a troubled world: "ACRES OF RAINFOREST NOW . . . 1,996,362,331. WORLD POPULATION NOW . . . 5,401,201,514."
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | AARON BETSKY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Aaron Betsky teaches and writes about architecture and urban design
One of my favorite tricks when I'm showing first-time visitors around Los Angeles is to bring them from the airport to the Westside along either La Cienega Boulevard or La Brea Avenue. After you wind through the surreal landscape of the Baldwin Hills oil fields, the barren hills start to open up, the road curves and there is western Los Angeles, spread out for you from downtown to the ocean.
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