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La Colonia Boxing Club

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The boxing dreams began 32 years ago, born of sweat and desire inside an abandoned firehouse. * They endured five years of hardship when the crude gym was shuttered by the city in 1990 and the fighting hopefuls of La Colonia Boxing Club were left shadowboxing in a cramped corner at the Oxnard Boys & Girls Club. But the dreams survived, and despite poor training facilities, a few Oxnard youngsters realized fantasies of becoming big-time boxers. Fernando Vargas became the youngest-ever U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most successful boxers to come out of La Colonia Boxing Club has won four world championships, yet very few people know her name. That's right: her name. Professional boxer Marischa Sjauw (pronounced Shaw) trains at the converted fire station, which has produced such male champions as Fernando Vargas and Robert Garcia. The 29-year-old Sjauw currently holds the lightweight (135-pound) world title for the International Female Boxers Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1990
I have been involved in amateur boxing for over three years as a judge, board member of both the California Golden Gloves and USA/Amateur Boxing Federation, Southern California Assn. and as an adult who cares deeply about today's youth. I have watched Martin Noriega do wonders with the young people who train under him at the La Colonia Boxing Club in Oxnard. He has produced many Junior Olympic champions (ages 10-15) and many Southern California champions, 16 and over. It has always been a pleasure to see Martin arrive at a show, followed by a troop of kids who, when in the ring, boxed their best or, if not in competition, rooted on the other members of their team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1998 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR
It takes 10 years to build a boxer. At least that is what Ruben Juarez says. As the director of La Colonia Youth Boxing Club, he should know. For more than 30 years the gym in the Oxnard barrio has plucked youth from La Colonia's rough streets and pounded them into national and international champions like Olympic boxers Fernando Vargas and Carlos Martinez. In a city wracked by gang violence, Vargas represents to many youths hope that there is a way off the streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most successful boxers to come out of La Colonia Boxing Club has won four world championships, yet very few people know her name. That's right: her name. Professional boxer Marischa Sjauw (pronounced Shaw) trains at the converted fire station, which has produced such male champions as Fernando Vargas and Robert Garcia. The 29-year-old Sjauw currently holds the lightweight (135-pound) world title for the International Female Boxers Assn.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | PAUL OLSON
Appropriately, home-grown professional boxers filled the first card at the Ventura Theater last month. Robbie Ruiz, 21, of Camarillo, Mario Solorio, 26, of Port Hueneme and John Ramirez, 26, of Oxnard all hail from the La Colonia Boxing Club in Oxnard. The club, located in the La Colonia barrio, is a dingy two-room facility with punching bags wedged between the walls and one boxing ring with red indoor-outdoor carpet instead of the traditional canvas covering. It has been known for many years as a club that turns out good Golden Glove boxers.
SPORTS
July 3, 1996 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mario Aguiniga spreads his fingers and methodically wraps them with surgical bandages, working his way up to the wrists, then solicits someone's help to slip on and lace a pair of boxing gloves. Aguiniga, 15, walks to a heavy bag and starts pounding it furiously, his eyes fixed on the target and his mind oblivious to the Mexican rancheras blasting from a boombox at La Colonia Boxing Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1998 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR
It takes 10 years to build a boxer. At least that is what Ruben Juarez says. As the director of La Colonia Youth Boxing Club, he should know. For more than 30 years the gym in the Oxnard barrio has plucked youth from La Colonia's rough streets and pounded them into national and international champions like Olympic boxers Fernando Vargas and Carlos Martinez. In a city wracked by gang violence, Vargas represents to many youths hope that there is a way off the streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1992 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL
La Colonia Boxing Club will hold a barbecue to raise funds for local boxer and Olympic hopeful Robert Garcia at the Boys & Girls Club, 126 E. 7th St. in Oxnard, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today. Robert, 17, will take part in a boxing exhibition, and T--shirts and souvenirs will be on sale. All profits will go toward Robert's training for the Olympic trials in Colorado Springs, Colo., in June. Oxnard Mayor Nao Takasugi and Councilman Manuel Lopez are expected to attend. Last week, Robert won the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1994 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is marred by weeds, graffiti and broken bottles, the tiny abandoned firehouse in Oxnard that once housed La Colonia Boxing Club. But the stucco building, and the 30 years of local boxing tradition it represents, have not been forgotten by the neighborhood's youth and community leaders--or, it now appears, by Oxnard's City Council. The City Council today is set to approve a $250,000 program to enlarge as well as renovate the old boxing club, located at 520 E. 1st St.
SPORTS
July 3, 1996 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mario Aguiniga spreads his fingers and methodically wraps them with surgical bandages, working his way up to the wrists, then solicits someone's help to slip on and lace a pair of boxing gloves. Aguiniga, 15, walks to a heavy bag and starts pounding it furiously, his eyes fixed on the target and his mind oblivious to the Mexican rancheras blasting from a boombox at La Colonia Boxing Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The boxing dreams began 32 years ago, born of sweat and desire inside an abandoned firehouse. * They endured five years of hardship when the crude gym was shuttered by the city in 1990 and the fighting hopefuls of La Colonia Boxing Club were left shadowboxing in a cramped corner at the Oxnard Boys & Girls Club. But the dreams survived, and despite poor training facilities, a few Oxnard youngsters realized fantasies of becoming big-time boxers. Fernando Vargas became the youngest-ever U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1990
I have been involved in amateur boxing for over three years as a judge, board member of both the California Golden Gloves and USA/Amateur Boxing Federation, Southern California Assn. and as an adult who cares deeply about today's youth. I have watched Martin Noriega do wonders with the young people who train under him at the La Colonia Boxing Club in Oxnard. He has produced many Junior Olympic champions (ages 10-15) and many Southern California champions, 16 and over. It has always been a pleasure to see Martin arrive at a show, followed by a troop of kids who, when in the ring, boxed their best or, if not in competition, rooted on the other members of their team.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | PAUL OLSON
Appropriately, home-grown professional boxers filled the first card at the Ventura Theater last month. Robbie Ruiz, 21, of Camarillo, Mario Solorio, 26, of Port Hueneme and John Ramirez, 26, of Oxnard all hail from the La Colonia Boxing Club in Oxnard. The club, located in the La Colonia barrio, is a dingy two-room facility with punching bags wedged between the walls and one boxing ring with red indoor-outdoor carpet instead of the traditional canvas covering. It has been known for many years as a club that turns out good Golden Glove boxers.
SPORTS
November 20, 1992
Andy Moffat, an All-Western State Conference pitcher for Ventura College last season, has made a commitment to play for Cal State Sacramento. Moffat, a 6-foot-3, 195-pound right-hander from Newbury Park High, had a 6-3 record with a 3.44 earned-run average as a Ventura sophomore. Norm Chung, the women's basketball coach at Cal Lutheran for nine seasons, has been named an assistant for the Moorpark High boys' basketball team. An ethics in coaching workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001 | Steve Chawkins
Reality No. 1: Manuel Herrera needed money for a new car to replace a tired blue '83 Toyota Supra with 196,000 miles and a bad attitude. Reality No. 2: A zealous optimist, Herrera knew he could get the cash by beating out thousands of competitors and making it onto a TV reality show. Reality No. 3: Over four days of auditions, Herrera beat out thousands of competitors and made it onto a new reality show called "The Mole." Reality No.
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