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La Gear Company

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BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
L.A. Gear, the high-flying maker of trendy athletic footwear, has hot-footed it past Converse to become the nation's third-best-selling athletic shoe brand, behind Nike and Reebok. For the six months ended May 31, the company, with offices in Marina del Rey, has said it expects to report sales of about $223 million, matching sales for all of last year. That easily would top the $175 million in sales during the same period projected for Converse, owned by Interco. L.A. Gear is "really the boss brand out there in the Valley Girl market," said John Horan, publisher of Sporting Goods Management News, a newsletter in Yardley, Pa. Nike, meanwhile, "continues to be the hottest thing in the market," Horan said, adding that he expects the company's "swoop"-adorned brand to bolt past Reebok when those companies report full-year results in mid-July.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like any inventor, L.A. Gear feels strongly about its creations. So the thriving Marina del Rey athletic shoe company was pleased when it was awarded design patent 300,181 by the federal government last March to protect an important step forward in its business: the Brats shoe, a sneaker with a tongue so fat that the shoe always looks fashionably untied. It was a big deal for L.A. Gear, and maybe for teen-agers who once had to trip on their laces in pursuit of the untied-shoelace style.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like any inventor, L.A. Gear feels strongly about its creations. So the thriving Marina del Rey athletic shoe company was pleased when it was awarded design patent 300,181 by the federal government last March to protect an important step forward in its business: the Brats shoe, a sneaker with a tongue so fat that the shoe always looks fashionably untied. It was a big deal for L.A. Gear, and maybe for teen-agers who once had to trip on their laces in pursuit of the untied-shoelace style.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like any inventor, L.A. Gear feels strongly about its creations. So the thriving Marina del Rey athletic shoe company was pleased when it was awarded design patent 300,181 by the federal government last March to protect an important step forward in its business: the Brats shoe, a sneaker with a tongue so fat the shoe always looks fashionably untied. It was a big deal for L.A. Gear, and maybe for teen-agers who once had to trip on their laces in pursuit of the untied-shoelace style.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like any inventor, L.A. Gear feels strongly about its creations. So the thriving Marina del Rey athletic shoe company was pleased when it was awarded design patent 300,181 by the federal government last March to protect an important step forward in its business: the Brats shoe, a sneaker with a tongue so fat the shoe always looks fashionably untied. It was a big deal for L.A. Gear, and maybe for teen-agers who once had to trip on their laces in pursuit of the untied-shoelace style.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | ANNE BOGART
In Paris, women clutch flirtatious little Chanel bags, so small they hold next to nothing. In New York, they take the opposite tack, lugging mega-tote bags that bend their backs into Quasimodo crouches, so they can keep their subway reading, gym clothes and other such sundries close at hand. But in Los Angeles, women breeze around town carrying nothing except a set of keys. That's because the quintessential California purse comes with four wheels and a trunk.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1993 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Robert Greenberg was forced out of L.A. Gear, the company he founded and built to nearly $1 billion of sales in the '80s, notable for its trendy footwear for women, including rhinestone-trimmed sneakers. Now Greenberg is back in the shoe business. And this time he is riding a '90s trend. Greenberg's new company, Skechers USA Inc., based in Manhattan Beach, is one of only two U. S. distributors of the clunky but popular Dr.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear, as its slogan says, might really be unstoppable. Trouble is, lately, it's been barreling in the wrong direction. The sneaker maker lost as much as $6 million in the last quarter, and its inventory remains overloaded with slow-selling lines. Some retailers--worried that L.A.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
L.A. Gear, the high-flying maker of trendy athletic footwear, has hot-footed it past Converse to become the nation's third-best-selling athletic shoe brand, behind Nike and Reebok. For the six months ended May 31, the company, with offices in Marina del Rey, has said it expects to report sales of about $223 million, matching sales for all of last year. That easily would top the $175 million in sales during the same period projected for Converse, owned by Interco. L.A. Gear is "really the boss brand out there in the Valley Girl market," said John Horan, publisher of Sporting Goods Management News, a newsletter in Yardley, Pa. Nike, meanwhile, "continues to be the hottest thing in the market," Horan said, adding that he expects the company's "swoop"-adorned brand to bolt past Reebok when those companies report full-year results in mid-July.
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