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La Habra Family Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Wendy Dallin knew it was the longest of longshots, but she still held out hope Tuesday that Orange County's top elected officials would restore the La Habra Family Center's funding despite a blown deadline after its grant writer became deathly ill with cancer. Dallin, coordinator of the nonprofit center, came to the Orange County Board of Supervisors meeting with half a dozen supporters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
A school program that helps families of poor children may close in June because its public funding will run out then and it is barred from raising money from private sources, officials say. The La Habra Family Center, founded in 1996 at Imperial Middle School, has served more than 4,500 children and adults with medical and social services. It was founded by then-Principal Betty Bidwell, who saw a need to help children learn by helping their families.
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OPINION
May 21, 2003
The La Habra Family Center had an extraordinary excuse for coming in four hours late with its application for a county grant. Too bad it ran into a bureaucrat whose intransigence was even more extraordinary. For six years, the center -- operating from a temporary building on a middle-school campus -- has offered services to the poor, from prenatal and dental care to parenting classes and temporary housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Wendy Dallin knew it was the longest of longshots, but she still held out hope Tuesday that Orange County's top elected officials would restore the La Habra Family Center's funding despite a blown deadline after its grant writer became deathly ill with cancer. Dallin, coordinator of the nonprofit center, came to the Orange County Board of Supervisors meeting with half a dozen supporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
A school program that helps families of poor children may close in June because its public funding will run out then and it is barred from raising money from private sources, officials say. The La Habra Family Center, founded in 1996 at Imperial Middle School, has served more than 4,500 children and adults with medical and social services. It was founded by then-Principal Betty Bidwell, who saw a need to help children learn by helping their families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | Erin Ailworth, Times Staff Writer
The Institute for Healthcare Advancement did what many nonprofits do: helped those of limited means. In this case, that just happened to be another nonprofit, the La Habra Family Resource Center, a free medical and social services organization. The center, which was housed at Imperial Middle School, had been plagued with money issues since losing funding in 2003 after its grant writer was stricken with cancer and missed a deadline by four hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Deadlines can be unforgiving. No organization knows it better than the La Habra Family Center, which, after six years of winning county funding, missed this year's application deadline and faces closure. The center had an extraordinary excuse: The grant writer for the 465-page proposal was suffering severe effects of advanced cancer. County officials wouldn't consider the application for $225,000 a year.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, Corinne Flocken is a free-lance writer who regularly covers Kid Stuff for The Times Orange County Edition.
It was an exhilarating game. Now, flushed with victory, you face your toughest call. Should you blow the wad on a genuine plastic back scratcher (available in fashion colors and a steal at a mere 30 points), or save up for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle doll, tantalizingly priced at 1,500 points? You go for the back scratcher. And you are proud. That's the beauty of an arcade.
OPINION
May 21, 2003
The La Habra Family Center had an extraordinary excuse for coming in four hours late with its application for a county grant. Too bad it ran into a bureaucrat whose intransigence was even more extraordinary. For six years, the center -- operating from a temporary building on a middle-school campus -- has offered services to the poor, from prenatal and dental care to parenting classes and temporary housing.
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