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La Jolla Museum Of Contemporary Art

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1986
The La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art will have new hours effective Sept. 2. Tuesday through Sunday, the museum will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Wednesday. Wednesday hours will be 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and after 5 p.m. admission will be free. The museum, 700 Prospect St., is closed Mondays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
San Diego TRAINS come and go at the Santa Fe Depot, as they have for nearly a century. But much has changed at the landmark station. Built for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition -- in a combination of Spanish Mission and Colonial Revival styles with a dash of Moorish flavor -- the downtown depot has become a venue for contemporary art as well as a hub for mass transportation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1988
As part of its Jazz on Film series, the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art will present "St. Louis Blues"--a 1958 film about W. C. Handy, the band leader, cornetist and songwriter who composed the song of the same name--at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Nat King Cole portrays Handy. Eartha Kitt and Ella Fitzgerald also star. Tickets are $3 general, $2 for La Jolla Museum members. The screening will be preceded by a jazz happy hour hosted by KSDS-FM (88.3).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In baroque art, display is everything. In the 17th century, visual information pumped up to a dynamic level of ostentatious show went hand in hand with European expansionism and a struggle by the Catholic Church against a rising tide of Protestantism. Baroque art was at the very foundations of the modern world. Now, four centuries later, the wildly diverse, often aggressive manner we think of as the baroque aesthetic might be tied more closely to the extravagant spectacles of popular culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1987 | HECTOR GUTIERREZ, Times Staff Writer
Lois Person Osborn, a trustee for the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art and longtime activist who organized well-received art exhibitions throughout Southern California, died Thursday at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla. She was 76. A son, Robert Osborn of Reno, Nev., said Friday that his mother died about 11:45 p.m. Thursday, apparently of internal complications caused by a broken hip suffered two weeks ago.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | BILL RITTER, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of charitable and civic organizations that received more than $1 million in contributions from the fraud-ridden J. David & Co. will be asked to return those funds or face litigation, the trustee in charge of the J. David bankruptcy case said Friday. Although the groups, which include the San Diego Symphony and the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, accepted the money in "good faith," the contributions by J.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, Times Staff Writer
Unveiling his design for an $11-million addition to the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, noted Post-Modern architect Robert Venturi said Wednesday that he plans to expose some of the museum's original Irving Gill architecture--now hidden. Speaking at a news conference here, Venturi praised the work of Gill, who designed the Ellen Browning Scripps house that in the 1940s became the museum. "It was very, very ahead of its time," Venturi said. "It was so abstract in its form.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | KEVIN BRASS
It's easy to be annoyed by these seemingly unending festivals of animation at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art. A few weeks after one ends, the promoters put together a "best of . . ." compilation and stoke the publicity fires again. The current edition, "The Fifth Annual Best of the Fest," is scheduled to screen at the museum through Aug. 5. The 11th edition of the actual Festival of Animation ended just two months ago, after a three-month stint.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1992 | JOHN R. LAMB, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's in a name? Plenty, if you ask officials at the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art, who are paying tens of thousands of dollars to an internationally known graphic-design firm to develop a new logo for another name change, the second in two years at the La Jolla institution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
San Diego TRAINS come and go at the Santa Fe Depot, as they have for nearly a century. But much has changed at the landmark station. Built for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition -- in a combination of Spanish Mission and Colonial Revival styles with a dash of Moorish flavor -- the downtown depot has become a venue for contemporary art as well as a hub for mass transportation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1992 | JOHN R. LAMB, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's in a name? Plenty, if you ask officials at the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art, who are paying tens of thousands of dollars to an internationally known graphic-design firm to develop a new logo for another name change, the second in two years at the La Jolla institution.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | KEVIN BRASS
It's easy to be annoyed by these seemingly unending festivals of animation at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art. A few weeks after one ends, the promoters put together a "best of . . ." compilation and stoke the publicity fires again. The current edition, "The Fifth Annual Best of the Fest," is scheduled to screen at the museum through Aug. 5. The 11th edition of the actual Festival of Animation ended just two months ago, after a three-month stint.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | KEVIN BRASS
During several weeks traveling in the Soviet Union, studying the regional film industries, Forrest Ciesol found something he wasn't prepared for in the large republic of Kazakhstan, on the Chinese border. "There was a genuine new wave of filmmakers happening unlike anything else in the Soviet Union--unlike anything else in the world," said Ciesol. "It seemed as if everyone was under 35 and making their first film. A studio making four feature films a year was tripling its output."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1988
As part of its Jazz on Film series, the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art will present "St. Louis Blues"--a 1958 film about W. C. Handy, the band leader, cornetist and songwriter who composed the song of the same name--at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Nat King Cole portrays Handy. Eartha Kitt and Ella Fitzgerald also star. Tickets are $3 general, $2 for La Jolla Museum members. The screening will be preceded by a jazz happy hour hosted by KSDS-FM (88.3).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, Times Staff Writer
Unveiling his design for an $11-million addition to the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, noted Post-Modern architect Robert Venturi said Wednesday that he plans to expose some of the museum's original Irving Gill architecture--now hidden. Speaking at a news conference here, Venturi praised the work of Gill, who designed the Ellen Browning Scripps house that in the 1940s became the museum. "It was very, very ahead of its time," Venturi said. "It was so abstract in its form.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1987 | HECTOR GUTIERREZ, Times Staff Writer
Lois Person Osborn, a trustee for the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art and longtime activist who organized well-received art exhibitions throughout Southern California, died Thursday at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla. She was 76. A son, Robert Osborn of Reno, Nev., said Friday that his mother died about 11:45 p.m. Thursday, apparently of internal complications caused by a broken hip suffered two weeks ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | KEVIN BRASS
During several weeks traveling in the Soviet Union, studying the regional film industries, Forrest Ciesol found something he wasn't prepared for in the large republic of Kazakhstan, on the Chinese border. "There was a genuine new wave of filmmakers happening unlike anything else in the Soviet Union--unlike anything else in the world," said Ciesol. "It seemed as if everyone was under 35 and making their first film. A studio making four feature films a year was tripling its output."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In baroque art, display is everything. In the 17th century, visual information pumped up to a dynamic level of ostentatious show went hand in hand with European expansionism and a struggle by the Catholic Church against a rising tide of Protestantism. Baroque art was at the very foundations of the modern world. Now, four centuries later, the wildly diverse, often aggressive manner we think of as the baroque aesthetic might be tied more closely to the extravagant spectacles of popular culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1986
The La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art will have new hours effective Sept. 2. Tuesday through Sunday, the museum will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Wednesday. Wednesday hours will be 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and after 5 p.m. admission will be free. The museum, 700 Prospect St., is closed Mondays.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | BILL RITTER, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of charitable and civic organizations that received more than $1 million in contributions from the fraud-ridden J. David & Co. will be asked to return those funds or face litigation, the trustee in charge of the J. David bankruptcy case said Friday. Although the groups, which include the San Diego Symphony and the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, accepted the money in "good faith," the contributions by J.
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