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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Damien Chazelle's “Whiplash” was the toast of this year's Sundance Film Festival, sweeping top prizes that set it up for a potentially nifty commercial and awards run when it hits theaters later this year. Now its writer-director, first-timer Damian Chazelle, is looking to capitalize on the heat with a new project, titled “La La Land,” according to a person familiar with the project who asked for anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about it publicly. Described as a romantic musical set in L.A., the script centers on an aspiring actress and jazz musician who fall in love but see their relationship tested by the high-stress environment of the city's arts and entertainment community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
A magnitude 7.2 temblor hit Mexico on Friday, with shaking felt across much of the country. Is it just me, oh fellow residents of La La Land, or does it feel like - in earthquake-speak  - the Big One is getting just a little too close for comfort? No, no, I'm not basing this on some new scientific theory. Conversely, no, my cat has not been acting oddly. It's just that, well, there's been a whole lot of shaking going on lately.    Friday's Mexico quake came on the heels of the magnitude 8.2 temblor that rocked Chile on April 1. And then there's the recent swarm of quakes in central Utah , the largest being a magnitude 4.9 on April 13. Plus, of course, Los Angeles' own “little” shaker on March 28, a magnitude 5.1 quake that rattled buildings - and nerves - across the region.
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SPORTS
August 4, 2009 | David Wharton
Twenty-five years later, it is hard to recall a time before the rumors and accusations. A time before athletes competed without suspicion hovering around each record-setting performance. A time before sprinters and swimmers had to share the sports page with the likes of nandrolone and stanozolol. The 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, it seems, were the last innocent Summer Games before the dawn of the steroid era.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Damien Chazelle's “Whiplash” was the toast of this year's Sundance Film Festival, sweeping top prizes that set it up for a potentially nifty commercial and awards run when it hits theaters later this year. Now its writer-director, first-timer Damian Chazelle, is looking to capitalize on the heat with a new project, titled “La La Land,” according to a person familiar with the project who asked for anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about it publicly. Described as a romantic musical set in L.A., the script centers on an aspiring actress and jazz musician who fall in love but see their relationship tested by the high-stress environment of the city's arts and entertainment community.
MAGAZINE
February 20, 2000 | Tina Daunt, Tina Daunt is a Times staff writer who covers City Hall and was covering the Sheriff's Department when Lee Baca was elected
Los Angeles County Sheriff Leroy D. Baca strides through the lobby of the boarded-up Hall of Justice at Temple and Spring, his polished shoes crushing chips of old paint that have flaked from the ceiling. A small flashlight illuminates his path as he makes his way to the main staircase in what once was the vibrant hub of the county's criminal justice system. He kneels and presses his hands against a cold marble step.
BOOKS
February 2, 1992
Allow me to add my voice to that of John Trollmann (Letters, Dec. 29), complaining about the exiguous Book Review. It is not only exiguous when compared to the TV Times, as Trollmann wrote, but also as compared to Calendar. Annually, the numbers of television shows, movies and shows--recordings too--pale compared to the numbers of publications, yet the pages devoted to these by The Times are inversely proportional--only in La La land. Hopefully you shall receive many more letters in support of John Trollmann's worthy opinion, which you may use in support of some day producing a Book Review that will do one better than what John Trollmann proposed, "to last me all day," and last all week till the next one. SYLVAIN FRIBOURG, WOODLAND HILLS
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2010 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
The British are coming, again, tonight, some by basic cable, some by premium. "The Inbetweeners," on BBC America, is a British version of a form of American comedy in which high school boys try to buy liquor and have sex. Narrator Will (Simon Bird), whose father has died, has had to switch from private to what we call public school, where he is immediately marked as an outsider, "a freak," and many words and phrases I can't print here. Still, he feels superior to the system, which he nevertheless fails to conquer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2006 | Steve Harvey, Steve Harvey can be reached at (800) LATIMES, Ext. 77083, by fax at (213) 237-4712, by mail at Metro, L.A. Times, 202 W. 1st St., L.A. 90012, and by e-mail at steve.harvey@latimes.com.
Folks in other parts of the country like to poke fun at Southern Californians, but we do have unique problems out here. For instance, a resident wrote to the "Your Two Cents Worth" column of the Palisadian-Post newspaper: "I have a complaint about my postal service. I have two names -- a legal name and an acting name. Periodically, mail coming to me under my acting name is returned to the sender, even though both names are on the mailbox."
SPORTS
January 15, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
There are 17.6 billion reasons the NFL is in no hurry to return to Los Angeles. That's the number of dollars four networks committed to pay the NFL for television rights through the 2005 season. Whatever happened to the notion that the networks would insist on a team in the L.A. area, the nation's No. 2 market, before negotiating new contracts? "Those critics who said the NFL needs L.A. or that L.A. needs the NFL should take note of the extraordinary contracts just completed without a team in L.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | JACK SMITH
I thought I had discovered a new epithet for Los Angeles the other day when I found it described as "La-la Land." It was in a column on her visit to Los Angeles by Mimi Loomer in Atencion San Miguel, a small English-language newspaper published in San Miguel de Allende, which is in the mountains 100 miles north of Mexico City. Loomer had made her first visit to Los Angeles after 15 years in Mexico and she found it "a shock." "Of course," she said, "when in La-la Land you must see Rodeo Drive. .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The allure of stardom brings model-handsome wannabe Adam (Matthew Ludwinski) to Hollywood - and down some dubious moneymaking side roads into gay pornography and escorting - in writer-director Casper Andreas' cautionary showbiz tale "Going Down in La-La Land," which is based on a novel by Andy Zeffer. But its Andreas' own attraction to the easy spotlight of warmed-over bitchy humor (courtesy Adam's gal pal roomie, played by Allison Lane), familiar plotting and by-the-numbers characterization that sinks this earnest, gay-contoured take on the evergreen making-it-big melodrama.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2010 | By August Brown
It was only 11 a.m. on Sunday at the Downtown Standard hotel, but Redfoo already had a crisis on his hands. The singer stood shirtless in a corner of his modish hotel room, his black pants hovering mid-thigh to reveal boxer-briefs with "Don't Judge Me" emblazoned in silver sequins across the tuchis . Searching to complete the ensemble he'd wear to the 52nd annual Grammy Awards ceremony, he rummaged through a pile of accouterments -- gold medallions...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2010
SERIES The Electric Company: The gang is making a movie on the return of the children's educational series (2:30 p.m. KLCS; 3:30 p.m. KCET; 5:30 p.m. KVCR). The Inbetweeners: This new six-part comedy series follows four school friends growing up in a sleepy British suburb. Simon Bird, Joe Thomas, James Buckley, Blake Harrison star (6 and 6:30 p.m.; 9 and 9:30 p.m. BBC America). How I Met Your Mother: Firmly convinced that Barney and Robin (Neil Patrick Harris, Cobie Smulders)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2010 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
The British are coming, again, tonight, some by basic cable, some by premium. "The Inbetweeners," on BBC America, is a British version of a form of American comedy in which high school boys try to buy liquor and have sex. Narrator Will (Simon Bird), whose father has died, has had to switch from private to what we call public school, where he is immediately marked as an outsider, "a freak," and many words and phrases I can't print here. Still, he feels superior to the system, which he nevertheless fails to conquer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
It's a new year and traditionally the time when television's dead are carried from the field and their replacements sent in. Good luck to you all; it's murder out there. Trends? A few new shows about parenting (joining "Modern Family," already in progress), a couple featuring comic-book action heroes (one actually a cartoon, the other based on a comic). The usual sprinkling of lawyers, doctors and lawmen. More of that northern weather that says "filmed in Canada." Television, ever changing, ever more or less the same.
SPORTS
August 4, 2009 | David Wharton
Twenty-five years later, it is hard to recall a time before the rumors and accusations. A time before athletes competed without suspicion hovering around each record-setting performance. A time before sprinters and swimmers had to share the sports page with the likes of nandrolone and stanozolol. The 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, it seems, were the last innocent Summer Games before the dawn of the steroid era.
BOOKS
October 29, 1989 | Jack Miles
Veteran Los Angelologist Jack Smith has delivered one of his periodic reports on the health of the client. Nearly all the several dozen component parts--the title one ventures an etymology of the city's latest goofy nickname--have previously appeared as columns in The Times. And how is the client doing? Suffice it to say that alive in La La Land continues to be preferable to the alternative.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two rules of genre fiction: 1) All surprises have to come from the plot. The reader doesn't want to be surprised by the atmosphere, the characters or the world-view implicit in the story, much less by the author's technique. (Imagine, Vladimir Nabokov once proposed in mock horror, a mystery without a word of dialogue, in which "the real crime is artistic originality.") All these are supposed to be cozily familiar.
OPINION
July 30, 2009 | MEGHAN DAUM
I admit it. I'm from New Jersey. I have logged nearly four times as many years living out of the state as in it -- my family moved there when I was 8 and I Ieft promptly at 18 -- but because it's where I went to high school and got my first driver's license and learned the proper pronunciation of "shore" ("shoo-wa"; because why have one vowel sound when you can have more?), I guess I'm more Jersey girl than not.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2008 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
A seat on the "Hot Tamale Train" is no longer the benchmark of success on "So You Think You Can Dance." There now is a more coveted ranking, a sweeter place known as the "Tra La La," and, yes, only judge Mary Murphy can explain what that means. She coined it this month, inspired by a Broadway routine performed flawlessly by hip-hop dancer Joshua Allen and his contemporary partner Katee Shean during Fox's multidiscipline dance competition for aspiring performers.
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