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BUSINESS
October 8, 2011 | Hugo Martin
Centuries before the bride of Frankenstein first screamed and hissed on the big screen in 1935, the legend of the wailing woman who drowned her children was already terrifying kids throughout Latin America. But only now, with Latinos constituting the largest minority group in the nation, has the tale of La Llorona started to creep into the nation's Halloween festivities. And she's not the only Latino myth infiltrating the autumn celebration of all things scary and gory. The trend in Southern California and other heavily Latino regions seems fueled by a growing Latino middle class that visits theme parks in greater numbers and the rising popularity of Halloween, now the second-biggest holiday for spending in the country, behind only Christmas.
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NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
After a growth spurt over the past few years, Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Hollywood has hit its stride as the leader in blood, guts and gore in Southern California. Photos: Halloween Horror Nights 2012 at Universal Studios Hollywood Following a reboot in 2006, Horror Nights has settled on a mix of terrifying haunted mazes tied to major horror movies, introducing a few new attractions every year while refreshing older offerings. The formula has proved wildly successful, with the movie theme park teeming with hordes of horror fans on weekends in late September and October.
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BUSINESS
September 29, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
This Halloween season, for the first time, Universal Studios Hollywood introduced a character based on the Latin American myth of La Llorona in its annual Halloween Horror Nights in an effort to connect with Southern California's sizable Latino population. The legend of La Llorona has gone through many variations over the years. It is a folktale about a woman who drowned her children after she was abandoned by their father. Tormented by what she has done, the woman's spirit wanders the earth, crying out for her dead children.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Universal Studios Hollywood has announced plans for haunted attractions based on "The Walking Dead"  TV show, "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" flim and "Silent Hill" video game as well as shock rocker Alice Cooper and the La Llorona folk legend, while continuing to drop hints about more scare zones and shows for Halloween Horror Nights 2012. Photos: Halloween Horror Nights 2012 at Universal Studios Hollywood The Walking Dead maze will take visitors into a post-apocalyptic wasteland overrun by hordes of zombies.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Universal Studios Hollywood has announced plans for haunted attractions based on "The Walking Dead"  TV show, "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" flim and "Silent Hill" video game as well as shock rocker Alice Cooper and the La Llorona folk legend, while continuing to drop hints about more scare zones and shows for Halloween Horror Nights 2012. Photos: Halloween Horror Nights 2012 at Universal Studios Hollywood The Walking Dead maze will take visitors into a post-apocalyptic wasteland overrun by hordes of zombies.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Halloween Horror Nights gets bigger, better and busier every year -- so much so the annual theme park event seems ready to burst like the bloody entrails spilling from the guts of so many hapless victims at Universal Studios Hollywood. > Halloween Horror Nights maze-by-maze preview | photos Horror Nights 2011 has grown to six mazes, many with hourlong waits during my visit on opening night, but the increasingly popular event probably needs twice as many mazes to handle the bloodthirsty hordes that crowd the park to capacity on the busiest evenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1995 | RICHARD MONTOYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Our Mexican American parents, aunts, uncles and grandparents never waited for Halloween to scare the living daylights out of us kids who would easily fall victim to horrifying tales of death, abduction and, yes, domestic violence. These fanciful tales have been honed down throughout the centuries, concocted by Spanish invaders to provoke fear and guilt in wild savages who would have only to turn to Christianity for salvation. Yes, my radical Chicano father used the same tactics as the oppressive Spaniards to get us children to buckle down out of sheer fear and guilt.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
After a growth spurt over the past few years, Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Hollywood has hit its stride as the leader in blood, guts and gore in Southern California. Photos: Halloween Horror Nights 2012 at Universal Studios Hollywood Following a reboot in 2006, Horror Nights has settled on a mix of terrifying haunted mazes tied to major horror movies, introducing a few new attractions every year while refreshing older offerings. The formula has proved wildly successful, with the movie theme park teeming with hordes of horror fans on weekends in late September and October.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
Some people can seduce everyone in their path with the disarming power of their vulnerability, the painful contours of their shyness, the utter awkwardness of their every move. Lhasa De Sela is one such woman. The 32-year-old Mexican American diva looked fragile and a bit disjointed Tuesday at the Conga Room, as she sang in English, Spanish and French. She accentuated the poetry in delicious new ways.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
As we slip into October, I decided to assemble my first-ever Fantasy Halloween League of the Top 13 haunted mazes at theme parks around the world. Think of the Top 13 list as a nightmare fantastic park with the most demented, disturbing and disgusting collection of haunted attractions ever gathered in one virtual place. Or my definition of a dream vacation if I had a bottomless budget and unlimited vacation time to jet around the world to the best and most bizarre haunts.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2011 | Hugo Martin
Centuries before the bride of Frankenstein first screamed and hissed on the big screen in 1935, the legend of the wailing woman who drowned her children was already terrifying kids throughout Latin America. But only now, with Latinos constituting the largest minority group in the nation, has the tale of La Llorona started to creep into the nation's Halloween festivities. And she's not the only Latino myth infiltrating the autumn celebration of all things scary and gory. The trend in Southern California and other heavily Latino regions seems fueled by a growing Latino middle class that visits theme parks in greater numbers and the rising popularity of Halloween, now the second-biggest holiday for spending in the country, behind only Christmas.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Halloween Horror Nights gets bigger, better and busier every year -- so much so the annual theme park event seems ready to burst like the bloody entrails spilling from the guts of so many hapless victims at Universal Studios Hollywood. > Halloween Horror Nights maze-by-maze preview | photos Horror Nights 2011 has grown to six mazes, many with hourlong waits during my visit on opening night, but the increasingly popular event probably needs twice as many mazes to handle the bloodthirsty hordes that crowd the park to capacity on the busiest evenings.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
This Halloween season, for the first time, Universal Studios Hollywood introduced a character based on the Latin American myth of La Llorona in its annual Halloween Horror Nights in an effort to connect with Southern California's sizable Latino population. The legend of La Llorona has gone through many variations over the years. It is a folktale about a woman who drowned her children after she was abandoned by their father. Tormented by what she has done, the woman's spirit wanders the earth, crying out for her dead children.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
Some people can seduce everyone in their path with the disarming power of their vulnerability, the painful contours of their shyness, the utter awkwardness of their every move. Lhasa De Sela is one such woman. The 32-year-old Mexican American diva looked fragile and a bit disjointed Tuesday at the Conga Room, as she sang in English, Spanish and French. She accentuated the poetry in delicious new ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1995 | RICHARD MONTOYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Our Mexican American parents, aunts, uncles and grandparents never waited for Halloween to scare the living daylights out of us kids who would easily fall victim to horrifying tales of death, abduction and, yes, domestic violence. These fanciful tales have been honed down throughout the centuries, concocted by Spanish invaders to provoke fear and guilt in wild savages who would have only to turn to Christianity for salvation. Yes, my radical Chicano father used the same tactics as the oppressive Spaniards to get us children to buckle down out of sheer fear and guilt.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
Students and former students at Plaza de la Raza's School of Performing Arts will perform two plays at the Margo Albert Theater. "Woman Hollering Creek," written by Sandra Cisneros, and "La Llorona," a traditional folk tale, were both adapted by Nancy De Los Santos with the participation of the young actors. The first play is taken from Cisneros' short story in which a woman finds her voice while escaping an abusive husband.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
It is the stuff of legends. Particularly of women. And most particularly of Latinas. Playwright Josefina Lopez, best known for her Emmy-winning play "Simply Maria," always wanted to write a story about La Llorona, the "Crying Woman" of Mexican legend. Her play "Unconquered Spirits," having its world premiere at Cal State Northridge's Little Theatre, is partly based on La Llorona and partly on Latinas from other eras. "The crying woman comes from so many places," Lopez explains.
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