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La Rochelle France

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TRAVEL
November 17, 2002
Reading the article on La Rochelle, France ("Savoring a Fine Old Port," Oct. 20), made us want to return immediately. We stayed in a gite (a private home) on the Rue St. Jean. I recommend staying in gites in France. Lists of available ones can be obtained from tourist offices. May L. Kingman Charlottesville, VA
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TRAVEL
August 10, 1986
Ladislaw Reday's article (July 13) about La Rochelle, France, was splendid. I stayed at the three-castle Hotel de France et d'Angleterre. A single room with bath, breakfast and six delicious dinners a week cost $50 a day. Highly recommended. No mention was made of the Musee du Nouveau Monde. Mme. Paulette Bonneil, a retired professor at the Institute of French Studies in La Rochelle (where I studied), serves on the museum's board of directors and is organizing tours for the museum.
SPORTS
September 21, 1997
This is the seventh Whitbread race, which is sailed every four years from Southampton, England. Ten 64-foot Whitbread 60s with crews of 12 will start at 2 p.m. local time (6 a.m. PDT) today. The course measures 31,600 nautical miles, with stops at Cape Town, South Africa; Fremantle and Sydney, Australia; Auckland, New Zealand; Sao Sebastiao, Brazil; Fort Lauderdale and Baltimore, U.S., and La Rochelle, France, finishing at Southampton about May 24.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | THOMAS CURWEN
The Whitbread Round the World Race has been yacht racing's ultimate challenge since 1973, and it is one of the most widely seen sporting events in the world. Media material generated by English sponsor Whitbread Breweries tosses about such viewership numbers as 326 million people in 175 countries on seven continents over 32 months.
SPORTS
May 18, 1998 | RICH ROBERTS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Cayard, a 38-year-old San Franciscan, became the first American skipper to win the Whitbread Round The World Race when he sailed EF Language into La Rochelle, France early Sunday morning. One leg remains--a mere 450 miles nautical miles to Southampton, England starting Friday--but EF Language's sixth-place finish on the eighth leg boosted its point total to 744, 115 more than its nearest rival, Swedish Match, with a maximum of 105 available for winning the final leg.
SPORTS
May 3, 1998 | RICH ROBERTS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Walking past Dennis Conner's boat, Toshiba, during the stopover at Fort Lauderdale, Fla., last month, EF Language skipper Paul Cayard allowed himself a moment of compassion for his rival. "Those guys are sailing the race from hell," Cayard said. He didn't know the half of it.
SPORTS
May 30, 2002 | Rich Roberts
Sweden's Assa Abloy, the nearest thing to an American entry, led the way into its home port minutes after midnight Wednesday to complete the eighth leg of the Volvo Ocean Race in the closest and most tightly packed finish of any phase of the global races of the last three decades.
NEWS
July 28, 1987 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
Three angry Zanesville, Ohio, residents got into hot water--courtesy of Mayor Don Mason. Sharon Bobo, her son Kory, and neighbor Jacque Andrews, were upset because the water from their homes' faucets had turned black. So they showered at the mayor's house. Mason, 30, who was not home at the time, said Andrews called to complain and asked Mason's mother if she could shower there. "Mom's very accommodating," he said. "She really didn't know how to react, so she just said yes."
NEWS
January 5, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Goode, television producer of such favorites as "Three's a Crowd" and "The Johnny Cash Show" and the first full-time television advisor in the White House, has died. He was 66. Goode died Dec. 22 in a Berlin hospital of injuries suffered in a September automobile accident, according to his daughter, Leslie Goode of Philadelphia. Named a special assistant by President Richard Nixon in 1971, Goode moved into politics through entertainment--with comedian Pat Paulsen.
SPORTS
May 20, 1998 | ANGUS PHILLIPS, WASHINGTON POST
If this were a normal sailboat regatta, Paul Cayard and his 11 mates could sit out the last leg of the Whitbread 'Round-the-World Race and relax while Swedish Match, Merit Cup and Chessie battled for second and third place. Cayard's EF Language has circled the planet so far ahead of eight rivals, it has an insurmountable lead with one leg to go. But Whitbread rules require all boats to finish.
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