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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art launched its MOCAtv channel on YouTube on Monday, offering an excellent deal - a free three-month membership to the actual, bricks and mortar, nonvirtual museum - for those who subscribe to the free online service, which features videos of artists creating or talking about their work. Museum members get in free instead of having to pay the $12 admission charge; memberships usually cost $85 for a full year. To take advantage of the offer, sign up for MOCAtv by Oct. 21. The channel debuted with 10 short videos, plus advertising content inserted by YouTube's parent company, Google, that made for interesting juxtapositions on its opening day. One clip was a studio visit with Robbie Conal, the Los Angeles artist known for his radical, left-wing political posters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art launched its MOCAtv channel on YouTube on Monday, offering an excellent deal - a free three-month membership to the actual, bricks and mortar, nonvirtual museum - for those who subscribe to the free online service, which features videos of artists creating or talking about their work. Museum members get in free instead of having to pay the $12 admission charge; memberships usually cost $85 for a full year. To take advantage of the offer, sign up for MOCAtv by Oct. 21. The channel debuted with 10 short videos, plus advertising content inserted by YouTube's parent company, Google, that made for interesting juxtapositions on its opening day. One clip was a studio visit with Robbie Conal, the Los Angeles artist known for his radical, left-wing political posters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
The first question is: What the heck do you call it? How do you describe a 12-day stretch of June in which three very different, recently minted theater festivals with major-league aspirations – " Radar L.A. " Hollywood Fringe and the Third National Asian American Theater Conference and Festival – all will be running in Greater Los Angeles at the same time that Theatre Communications Group the nation's largest theatrical professional...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Jori Finkel and Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The Museum of Contemporary Art has fired chief curator Paul Schimmel, a respected art world figure who was at odds with board members and director Jeffrey Deitch over the direction of the museum. Schimmel, who headed the MOCA curatorial staff for 22 years, was let go Wednesday after a vote of the museum board. According to several sources, he was summoned to the office of billionaire art collector and philanthropist Eli Broad, MOCA's top funder, and told of the board's decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
Continuing an unusual tradition of including artists in its governance, L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art has elected conceptualist Barbara Kruger to its board of trustees. Kruger, a professor at UCLA, will join artists John Baldessari and Edward Ruscha, appointed a few years ago, and three other new members: Christopher V. Walker, a financial executive who founded Meridian Pacific Capital Partners and recently ended a 10-year tenure on the board at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Charles S. Cohen, a real estate developer; and Maurice Marciano, a fashion designer and co-founder of Guess Inc. MOCA also has announced the acquisition of 130 artworks purchased, donated or promised in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Ousted last year as president of Pasadena's Art Center College of Design, Richard Koshalek will return to the museum world in the nation's capital as director of the Smithsonian Institution's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Wayne Clough, the Smithsonian's new secretary, announced the appointment, effective April 13, in a statement Thursday, citing Koshalek's "vast experience in both the education and museum worlds." Before taking over Art Center's top spot in 1999 with a mandate to raise money and expand the campus, Koshalek, 67, was an institution-building director of L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art in the 1980s and '90s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
In July 1999, when Jeremy Strick emerged from the Art Institute of Chicago's curatorial shadows and stepped into the director's spotlight at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, he thought he had found a near-perfect opportunity. He had watched from afar as MOCA burst into life in 1979. As it moved into adolescence, he was impressed with its ability to build a collection, exhibition program and international reputation with astonishing speed. "And I loved Los Angeles," he said this week in an interview in his office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2009 | Cara Mia DiMassa
The Museum of Neon Art opened its doors in downtown Los Angeles in 1981 -- long before the city center was fashionable. For much of this time, the museum has moved around the area, looking for a spot large enough to show off its uniquely Southern California collection. At its current location on 4th Street in the Old Bank district, visitors to the museum have a tendency to look befuddled after viewing the 20 pieces of neon and wonder where some of the more iconic pieces are located.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2010 | By Mike Boehm
L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art says it will name its new director Monday, and one of the names in play is that of Jeffrey Deitch, a high-flying New York City art dealer who, if chosen, would represent a break with art museum convention. Neither the museum, nor arts patron Eli Broad -- whose $30-million pledge was the cornerstone of the museum's rescue from financial peril in late 2008 -- would comment on the finalists for the job. "We've interviewed about 13 people and no decision has been made yet, by either the search committee or the board, but we hope that will happen soon," Broad said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Stedelijk Museum has a long-standing reputation in the art world for innovation. That spirit was underscored with the 2009 choice of an American as its new director: Ann Goldstein, who was then a senior curator at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art. Goldstein was excited by the notion of presiding over the reopening of the country's most important museum of modern and contemporary art, which had been closed for renovations since 2003. Because of delays due to governmental bureaucracy, funding issues and construction problems, the museum had presented exhibitions in satellite locations around Amsterdam between 2004 and 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
The first question is: What the heck do you call it? How do you describe a 12-day stretch of June in which three very different, recently minted theater festivals with major-league aspirations – " Radar L.A. " Hollywood Fringe and the Third National Asian American Theater Conference and Festival – all will be running in Greater Los Angeles at the same time that Theatre Communications Group the nation's largest theatrical professional...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Stedelijk Museum has a long-standing reputation in the art world for innovation. That spirit was underscored with the 2009 choice of an American as its new director: Ann Goldstein, who was then a senior curator at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art. Goldstein was excited by the notion of presiding over the reopening of the country's most important museum of modern and contemporary art, which had been closed for renovations since 2003. Because of delays due to governmental bureaucracy, funding issues and construction problems, the museum had presented exhibitions in satellite locations around Amsterdam between 2004 and 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2010 | By Mike Boehm
L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art says it will name its new director Monday, and one of the names in play is that of Jeffrey Deitch, a high-flying New York City art dealer who, if chosen, would represent a break with art museum convention. Neither the museum, nor arts patron Eli Broad -- whose $30-million pledge was the cornerstone of the museum's rescue from financial peril in late 2008 -- would comment on the finalists for the job. "We've interviewed about 13 people and no decision has been made yet, by either the search committee or the board, but we hope that will happen soon," Broad said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2009 | Cara Mia DiMassa
The Museum of Neon Art opened its doors in downtown Los Angeles in 1981 -- long before the city center was fashionable. For much of this time, the museum has moved around the area, looking for a spot large enough to show off its uniquely Southern California collection. At its current location on 4th Street in the Old Bank district, visitors to the museum have a tendency to look befuddled after viewing the 20 pieces of neon and wonder where some of the more iconic pieces are located.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Ousted last year as president of Pasadena's Art Center College of Design, Richard Koshalek will return to the museum world in the nation's capital as director of the Smithsonian Institution's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Wayne Clough, the Smithsonian's new secretary, announced the appointment, effective April 13, in a statement Thursday, citing Koshalek's "vast experience in both the education and museum worlds." Before taking over Art Center's top spot in 1999 with a mandate to raise money and expand the campus, Koshalek, 67, was an institution-building director of L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art in the 1980s and '90s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
In July 1999, when Jeremy Strick emerged from the Art Institute of Chicago's curatorial shadows and stepped into the director's spotlight at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, he thought he had found a near-perfect opportunity. He had watched from afar as MOCA burst into life in 1979. As it moved into adolescence, he was impressed with its ability to build a collection, exhibition program and international reputation with astonishing speed. "And I loved Los Angeles," he said this week in an interview in his office.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
They say the multitudes of museum buildings going up in the world are secularized cathedrals for modern society. If these new edifices with their flashy architecture, restaurants, boutique shops and crowd-pleasing exhibitions are cathedrals, then what were those quiet, empty places we used to stroll quite alone for hours of aesthetic refreshment?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Jori Finkel and Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The Museum of Contemporary Art has fired chief curator Paul Schimmel, a respected art world figure who was at odds with board members and director Jeffrey Deitch over the direction of the museum. Schimmel, who headed the MOCA curatorial staff for 22 years, was let go Wednesday after a vote of the museum board. According to several sources, he was summoned to the office of billionaire art collector and philanthropist Eli Broad, MOCA's top funder, and told of the board's decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
Continuing an unusual tradition of including artists in its governance, L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art has elected conceptualist Barbara Kruger to its board of trustees. Kruger, a professor at UCLA, will join artists John Baldessari and Edward Ruscha, appointed a few years ago, and three other new members: Christopher V. Walker, a financial executive who founded Meridian Pacific Capital Partners and recently ended a 10-year tenure on the board at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Charles S. Cohen, a real estate developer; and Maurice Marciano, a fashion designer and co-founder of Guess Inc. MOCA also has announced the acquisition of 130 artworks purchased, donated or promised in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
They say the multitudes of museum buildings going up in the world are secularized cathedrals for modern society. If these new edifices with their flashy architecture, restaurants, boutique shops and crowd-pleasing exhibitions are cathedrals, then what were those quiet, empty places we used to stroll quite alone for hours of aesthetic refreshment?
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