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La Traviata

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On Saturday, Los Angeles Opera will be giving its first performance ever of Giuseppe Verdi's "Simon Boccanegra," a work that straddles a longer span of time in his extraordinary evolution than any other. The story of a seafaring adventurer who fathered a child out of wedlock and is elected the Doge (ruler) of Genoa amid a feud between the Patricians and the Plebeians, "Boccanegra" was originally written in 1857 in the center of his famous middle period but then extensively revised in 1881 just before his great final period.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By David Ng
Renée Fleming will return to Los Angeles Opera later this season in a production of André Previn's "A Streetcar Named Desire," which is scheduled to run for three performances at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on May 18, 21 and 24, 2014. The production will mark the first time that Fleming has performed in an opera for the company since her 2006 role in "La Traviata. " (She has appeared in recitals for L.A. Opera in the interim.) Fleming, who plays Blanche DuBois in the adaptation of the Tennessee Williams play, first performed in the role in 1998 at San Francisco Opera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1990
Soprano Stephanie Friede has withdrawn from three performances of Verdi's "La Traviata" with Opera Pacific at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Friede, reportedly ill, will be replaced by Brenda Harris at the Sunday matinee and by Nova Thomas on Friday and Jan. 21.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Zeroing in on the art of rehearsal, "Becoming Traviata" is an exquisitely observed look at performance and the creative process. You don't need to be an opera buff to appreciate Philippe Béziat's documentary, which makes the essentials of Verdi's romantic drama "La Traviata" clear while building its own stirring narrative around a French festival production's director and star. Béziat takes in many telling details of the work-in-progress, from the backstage paintbrushes to the crew members working out their scenery cues, but the pulse of his film is the interaction between the director, Jean-Francois Sivadier, and the soprano, Natalie Dessay.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Please bear with me; this can get confusing. Los Angeles Opera has two Marta Domingo productions of Verdi's "La Traviata," an updated one and a traditional one that feels like it's been around forever. The newer "Traviata" premiered at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 2006, with Elizabeth Futral as the 19th century Parisian courtesan turned into a '20s flapper. But a few months later, the old one was taken out of mothballs for a flapper-averse Renee Fleming, when L.A.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN
The story of "La Traviata": A young woman breaks off with the only man she has ever loved at the instigation of the man's family. When the broken-hearted man sees her dancing at a party, he yells at her and scornfully throws money in her face. Eventually he finds out that she truly loves him and rushes to her side, but by that point in Verdi's opera she is, naturally, just working up to her death aria.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1996 | CHRIS PASLES
A fiasco at its premiere in Venice in 1853, Verdi's "La Traviata" has nevertheless become virtually foolproof. Little wonder. Give us a reasonably sensitive Violetta and a reasonably sensitive conductor, and it doesn't take much else for the drama of the good-hearted courtesan who sacrifices herself for love to break some hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
"La Traviata" is a tough old bird. You can take the opera apart and put it together in 100 different ways and, no matter what, Verdi survives little more than lightly bruised. In the Wadsworth Theater on Saturday night, the Marina-Westchester Symphony Orchestra conducted by Frank Fetta contrived what they called a "concert dramatization" of the opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES
Citing health reasons, soprano Stephanie Friede has withdrawn from three upcoming performances in the title role of Verdi's "La Traviata" at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, Opera Pacific announced Thursday. Friede, who reportedly became ill during rehearsals, will be replaced as Violetta by Brenda Harris at performances at 2 p.m. on Sunday and by Nova Thomas at 8 p.m. on Jan. 19 and 2 p.m. on Jan. 21, company general director David DiChiera said in a prepared statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Saturday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, Opera Pacific gave the first performance of its latest, reasonably lavish production of "La Traviata." It wasn't an altogether happy experience. The Violetta, Tiziana Fabbricini, confirmed her international reputation for being controversial, to say the least. Her two leading men were strong, but the secondhand staging scheme tended to sag, and the music-making under Steven Mercurio seemed nervous at best, mechanical at worst.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By David Ng
When soprano Natalie Dessay showed up for rehearsals for the 2011 production of "La Traviata" at the annual Aix-en-Provence Festival in France, she encountered a rather unwelcome presence -- a documentary crew with a camera that followed her around in disarming proximity. "I didn't want them to be there. I was very annoyed that someone was filming us," Dessay recalled in a recent interview. The French singer was speaking by phone from San Francisco, where she was preparing to perform in Offenbach's "The Tales of Hoffman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Damon Albarn continues to take on projects other than plotting a U.S. tour for intermittently reunited Brit-pop band Blur. In London on Wednesday, the artist unveiled a new program designed to bring new audiences to the opera. The English National Opera initiative, dubbed "Undress for Opera," designates four performances  -- one each of "Don Giovanni," "La Traviata," "Sunken Garden" and "The Perfect American" -- to be a more casual, affordable...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On Saturday, Los Angeles Opera will be giving its first performance ever of Giuseppe Verdi's "Simon Boccanegra," a work that straddles a longer span of time in his extraordinary evolution than any other. The story of a seafaring adventurer who fathered a child out of wedlock and is elected the Doge (ruler) of Genoa amid a feud between the Patricians and the Plebeians, "Boccanegra" was originally written in 1857 in the center of his famous middle period but then extensively revised in 1881 just before his great final period.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Please bear with me; this can get confusing. Los Angeles Opera has two Marta Domingo productions of Verdi's "La Traviata," an updated one and a traditional one that feels like it's been around forever. The newer "Traviata" premiered at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 2006, with Elizabeth Futral as the 19th century Parisian courtesan turned into a '20s flapper. But a few months later, the old one was taken out of mothballs for a flapper-averse Renee Fleming, when L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Whatever you do, don't tell Russian soprano Marina Poplavskaya that her performance -- or any other artist's -- is "OK." She'd rather be hated than provoke no reaction at all. "This singer was terrific, and this singer was 'OK,' what do you mean by 'OK'?" she exclaims. "How can you call any sort of art 'OK'? It's dead if it's OK."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
This will shock you. So please put aside cynicism for a moment. Yes, Los Angeles Opera has remounted Marta Domingo's well-worn first production of Verdi's "La Traviata" with a non-star cast in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Yes, the conductor was the company's associate conductor in his company debut Thursday night. Yes, the company will, of course, run this popular opera, with changing casts, for a month in hopes of raising as much cash as it can to help support its costly "Ring" cycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea in going to a production by Western Opera Theater, the touring arm of the San Francisco Opera, is to catch a rising star or at least find comfort in the level of training young singers are receiving in that major opera house. Neither of these hopes panned out substantially, however, at a WOT performance of Verdi's "La Traviata" Friday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. In English, and with accompaniment from two pianos, it was sponsored by the UC Irvine Office of Arts and Lectures.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
All sorts of sopranos sing, or attempt to sing, Violetta in "La Traviata." Few can resist the complex lure of Verdi's tragic, self-sacrificing heroine--the archetypal whore with a heart, and voice, of gold. Sweet coloraturas find the giddy finale of the first act particularly congenial, though they may court vocal grief when the music requires greater force later on. Singers with heavier, less flexible voices bask in the heroic outbursts, but skim past the florid hurdles. Spinto --e.g.
NEWS
January 21, 2009
Placido Domingo: An article in Monday's Calendar section about the reopening of the Mahalia Jackson Theater in New Orleans said tenor Placido Domingo sang his first "La Traviata" in that city. It was the role of Manrico in Verdi's "Il Trovatore" that Domingo sang for the first time with the New Orleans Opera Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2007
YOU should have mentioned downtown Canoga Park in your two-page coverage of opera at Oberlin College in Ohio; in Austin, Texas; Omaha; and St. Paul, Minn. ["Opera's New Harvest." April 1]. I submit that "La Traviata" as presented recently at the jewel-box Madrid Theatre in Canoga Park is exactly what your story was all about. They played to a packed house, in a small town, with a 20-piece orchestra and amazing performers. It was the kind of night you don't expect or easily forget.
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