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Labastida

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NEWS
May 25, 2000 | Reuters
Mexican presidential contender Vicente Fox said Wednesday that he will attend a potentially pivotal TV debate Friday, laying to rest days of wrangling over the date and format for a final public encounter between the candidates before the July 2 vote. Fox, who has mounted a strong challenge to the candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, had suggested Tuesday that he would not attend the event agreed upon by his two main rivals because he would be campaigning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruling party candidate Francisco Labastida held the thinnest of leads Friday in most of the final opinion polls released before the July 2 presidential election, indicating that his race against charismatic challenger Vicente Fox is the closest in Mexican history. When their margins of error are taken into account, nearly all the polls showed the race to be a statistical dead heat. Among the major surveys, Labastida led in three by about 3 percentage points.
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OPINION
June 11, 2000 | FRANCISCO LABASTIDA, Sergio Munoz, a Times editorial writer, compiled the candidates' statements
Mexico's relationship with the United States is one of the most dynamic and complex in the world. Our citizens living on the 2,000-mile border are on the front line of the U.S.-Mexico relationship. It is important that the U.S., like Mexico, work hard to support policies that address the common challenges our citizens face on a daily basis. My administration will focus its efforts on strengthening our policies at home so that we can continue to build a strong and mutually successful partnership.
OPINION
June 11, 2000 | FRANCISCO LABASTIDA, Sergio Munoz, a Times editorial writer, compiled the candidates' statements
Mexico's relationship with the United States is one of the most dynamic and complex in the world. Our citizens living on the 2,000-mile border are on the front line of the U.S.-Mexico relationship. It is important that the U.S., like Mexico, work hard to support policies that address the common challenges our citizens face on a daily basis. My administration will focus its efforts on strengthening our policies at home so that we can continue to build a strong and mutually successful partnership.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a crisp Saturday morning, hundreds of supporters of Francisco Labastida jammed a pavilion here, shaking green pompoms, jangling cowbells and cheering for the man widely seen as the leading presidential candidate for the world's longest-ruling party. The rally appeared to reflect an outpouring of emotion as Mexico faces a milestone in its young democracy: the first presidential primary of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. But a closer look at the crowd showed something different.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major national poll released Thursday shows opposition challenger Vicente Fox taking the lead among likely Mexican voters in this July's election. The survey fed feverish speculation that the world's longest-ruling party could be headed for its first defeat in a presidential race. The poll by U.S.-based firm Zogby International was the first distributed publicly by a professional, independent company that put Fox ahead.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francisco Labastida was no stranger to violence. As governor of Sinaloa state, Mexico's legendary drug capital, he had received the whispered warnings, opened the scribbled death threats. But this new peril was different. Mexican intelligence agencies had learned of a plot to kill Labastida, who had just left office. And his wife, Maria Teresa Uriarte, was offering a chilling hint of that threat: A mysterious man had snapped pictures of her in an outdoor market and then fled.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a showdown shaped more by insults than by policy, Mexico's two leading presidential candidates traded bitter personal attacks Tuesday night in the first debate ahead of the July 2 election--suddenly the most competitive in the country's history. Although all six candidates took part, the 90-minute face-off quickly turned into a duel between front-runner Francisco Labastida of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, and Vicente Fox, a challenger known for his cowboy charisma.
OPINION
June 4, 2000 | DENISE DRESSER
Francisco Labastida, the candidate of Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, has sold his soul to the devil. Frightened by the polls that place him neck-and-neck with his rival, Vicente Fox, Labastida has reorganized his campaign and brought back old-time party bosses. By embracing yesterday's politicians, Labastida is losing tomorrow's voters. By linking arms with the party's dinosaurs, Labastida is betraying the party's modernizers.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruling party candidate Francisco Labastida held the thinnest of leads Friday in most of the final opinion polls released before the July 2 presidential election, indicating that his race against charismatic challenger Vicente Fox is the closest in Mexican history. When their margins of error are taken into account, nearly all the polls showed the race to be a statistical dead heat. Among the major surveys, Labastida led in three by about 3 percentage points.
OPINION
June 4, 2000 | DENISE DRESSER
Francisco Labastida, the candidate of Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, has sold his soul to the devil. Frightened by the polls that place him neck-and-neck with his rival, Vicente Fox, Labastida has reorganized his campaign and brought back old-time party bosses. By embracing yesterday's politicians, Labastida is losing tomorrow's voters. By linking arms with the party's dinosaurs, Labastida is betraying the party's modernizers.
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | Reuters
Mexican presidential contender Vicente Fox said Wednesday that he will attend a potentially pivotal TV debate Friday, laying to rest days of wrangling over the date and format for a final public encounter between the candidates before the July 2 vote. Fox, who has mounted a strong challenge to the candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, had suggested Tuesday that he would not attend the event agreed upon by his two main rivals because he would be campaigning.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major national poll released Thursday shows opposition challenger Vicente Fox taking the lead among likely Mexican voters in this July's election. The survey fed feverish speculation that the world's longest-ruling party could be headed for its first defeat in a presidential race. The poll by U.S.-based firm Zogby International was the first distributed publicly by a professional, independent company that put Fox ahead.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francisco Labastida was no stranger to violence. As governor of Sinaloa state, Mexico's legendary drug capital, he had received the whispered warnings, opened the scribbled death threats. But this new peril was different. Mexican intelligence agencies had learned of a plot to kill Labastida, who had just left office. And his wife, Maria Teresa Uriarte, was offering a chilling hint of that threat: A mysterious man had snapped pictures of her in an outdoor market and then fled.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a showdown shaped more by insults than by policy, Mexico's two leading presidential candidates traded bitter personal attacks Tuesday night in the first debate ahead of the July 2 election--suddenly the most competitive in the country's history. Although all six candidates took part, the 90-minute face-off quickly turned into a duel between front-runner Francisco Labastida of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, and Vicente Fox, a challenger known for his cowboy charisma.
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Millions of Mexicans cast votes Sunday in a presidential primary that marked a make-or-break experiment in democracy for the country's long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party. The overwhelming winner was veteran politician Francisco Labastida. Militants within the party, known as the PRI, hope the election will give the world's longest-governing party the credibility to extend its 70-year rule into the 21st century.
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Millions of Mexicans cast votes Sunday in a presidential primary that marked a make-or-break experiment in democracy for the country's long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party. The overwhelming winner was veteran politician Francisco Labastida. Militants within the party, known as the PRI, hope the election will give the world's longest-governing party the credibility to extend its 70-year rule into the 21st century.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a crisp Saturday morning, hundreds of supporters of Francisco Labastida jammed a pavilion here, shaking green pompoms, jangling cowbells and cheering for the man widely seen as the leading presidential candidate for the world's longest-ruling party. The rally appeared to reflect an outpouring of emotion as Mexico faces a milestone in its young democracy: the first presidential primary of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. But a closer look at the crowd showed something different.
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