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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Randy Lewis
Apple Inc. has begun pressuring the major record companies to offer new releases exclusively through its iTunes store - a move that would initially block availability on streaming services such as Spotify or Beats Music, according to several people familiar with the matter. Apple executives contend that on-demand music services have begun to cannibalize download sales, and its representatives are demanding the labels create a period reserved for digital purchasing. Music industry insiders, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals from the industry's dominant retailer, said Apple's push for a new release window - similar to the one that some Hollywood studios impose for films newly released for home viewing - shows the Cupertino, Calif., tech giant is scrambling to retain its competitive advantage in an evolving digital music market.
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OPINION
March 2, 2014
Re "U.S. to revamp nutrition labels," Business, Feb. 27 Thanks for spotlighting Michelle Obama's campaign to change food labels. I am a registered nurse, and I frequently educate my patients on nutrition. It is indisputable that diet has an impact on health. Still, I have found that the majority of the patients I educate have some deficiency in their knowledge of nutrition. Several patients have expressed to me that they have difficulty navigating through the grocery store attempting to figure out which foods are healthful.
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The U.S. Food and Drug administration broke new ground in consumer protection when it required, more than 20 years ago, the now-familiar nutrition labels on virtually every bit of packaged food. Now, the labels are being revamped - in ways that have both benefits and downsides. One of the most noticeable changes - and the least justifiable - would be the addition of a new sub-category: the number of grams of added sugar in the food, in addition to the existing measure of total sugar.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON  - The way nutritional information is displayed on food is “simply not acceptable,” First Lady Michelle Obama declared on Thursday as she endorsed an administration effort that would force the food industry to more clearly label the amount of fat, sugar and salt in its products.  “As consumers and as parents, we have a right to understand what's in the food we're feeding our families,” Obama said from the East Room of the...
SCIENCE
February 27, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Aiming to give Americans the tools to make healthier dietary choices, the Food and Drug Administration has unveiled a revamped version of one of the nation's most recognized graphics -- the "Nutrition Facts" box that appears on the back or side of packaged foods and beverages. The proposed new information box increases the visibility of the "serving size," allowing consumers to see without mental gymnastics the size of a normal portion, as well as the nutrients it contains. It advertises the calorie content of a serving in larger typeface than any other information on the label, shouting a clear message over the cacophany of dietary advice: that too many of these are, first and foremost, the cause of obesity.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration on Thursday will propose the first major revamp of nutrition labels in more than two decades, an update that would emphasize calorie information, include the amount of added sugars and revise serving sizes to reflect how people really consume food. The revision is aimed, in part, at addressing serious public health issues, including obesity and other chronic diseases. Administration officials believe the new labels could lead consumers to make more healthful food choices and encourage the food industry to reformulate some products, particularly those with high amounts of added sugar.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Soda consumption is down nationwide, to per capita levels last seen in 1987. It's even down among kids. As word gets out about the empty calories in soft drinks, people have been getting the message. Such changes come slowly, but they happen. But other things are happening as well. Teenagers have been replacing their sodas with coffee. And we're not talking double shots of espresso. They go for the milky, sweetened coffees that, per ounce, contain twice the calories of a Coca-Cola.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Citing studies linking soda to obesity, a state lawmaker and medical experts proposed a first-in-the-nation bill Thursday that sugary drinks sold in California carry health warning labels similar to those on cigarette packs. They want warning labels on the fronts of all cans and bottles of soda and juice drinks that have sugar added and 75 or more calories per 12 ounces. The label would read: "STATE OF CALIFORNIA SAFETY WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Citing studies linking soda to obesity, a state lawmaker and medical experts proposed a first-in-the-nation bill Thursday that would require sugary drinks sold in California to have health warning labels similar to those on packs of cigarettes. State Sen. Bill Monning (D-Carmel) and the California Medical Assn. said the legislation is necessary because research links sugary drink consumption to skyrocketing rates of diabetes, tooth decay and obesity.  “When the science is this conclusive, the state of California has a responsibility to take steps to protect consumers,” Monning said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Is it too much to compare Kem Nunn to Raymond Chandler? Both have used the loose frame of genre to write enduringly and resonantly about the dark side of the California dream. For Nunn, this has meant an exploration of boundaries, both actual and metaphorical; his last novel, "Tijuana Straits" (which won a 2005 Los Angeles Times Book Prize), traces the shifting landscape of the physical borderland. At the same time, there is also a willingness to take risks, to play against expectation, which marks both Nunn's fiction and his TV work on "John from Cincinnati" and now "Sons of Anarchy.
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