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NEWS
March 26, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration unveiled a sweeping anti-smoking proposal Friday that would ban virtually all indoor smoking wherever people work--from restaurants and bars to offices to factory canteens and nursing homes. The unprecedented action would affect 6 million workplaces and protect "more than 20 million working men and women (who) face unnecessary health threats" from secondhand smoke, said Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich.
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NEWS
March 26, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration unveiled a sweeping anti-smoking proposal Friday that would ban virtually all indoor smoking wherever people work--from restaurants and bars to offices to factory canteens and nursing homes. The unprecedented action would affect 6 million workplaces and protect "more than 20 million working men and women (who) face unnecessary health threats" from secondhand smoke, said Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich.
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NEWS
December 24, 1992
President-elect Bill Clinton has filled 10 of his Cabinet posts: POSITIONS FILLED Post Appointee Currently State Warren Christopher Lawrence S. Eagleburger Defense Les Aspin Dick Cheney Treasury Lloyd Bentsen Nicholas F. Brady Labor Robert B. Reich Lynn Martin Commerce Ronald H. Brown Barbara Hackman Franklin Veterans Affairs Jesse Brown Anthony J. Principi Housing and Urban Development Henry G. Cisneros Jack Kemp Education Richard W. Riley Lamar Alexander Energy Hazel O'Leary James D.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1996 | DAVID SEGAL, WASHINGTON POST
Was it a fluke or the beginning of an onslaught? That question swirls around a New York jury's unprecedented decision to award almost $6 million in damages to three women who said they were injured by repeatedly using their computer keyboards. The verdict marks the first time a computer maker--in this case, Digital Equipment Corp.--has been ordered to compensate workers for repetitive stress injuries.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bipartisan delegation of more than 35 members of the California Legislature will go to Washington next week to meet with President Clinton, his top officials and House Speaker Newt Gingrich to discuss immigration, defense conversion-base closure, crime and welfare reform. Led by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) and Senate President Pro Tem Bill Lockyer (D-Hayward), the lawmakers are scheduled to meet with Clinton sometime during their three-day visit that begins Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
The United States is at risk of developing into a two-tiered society in which only a small, well-educated minority holds good jobs, warned U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert B. Reich during a meeting Tuesday in Sun Valley. "We cannot live in a society . . . in which one big portion of the population is going on a downward escalator while the other small portion that has received an education is going on an up escalator," Reich said. "That great divide is going to fragment our nation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
California has the highest number of working poor families in the nation, but the state does an ineffective  job of providing educational opportunities to boost them out of poverty, according to a new report released Wednesday. The report, Working Hard, Left Behind , found that the state has the largest number of adults without a high school diploma or equivalent and ranks last among states in the percentage of low-income working families in which neither parent has a college education.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1994 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The nation's defined-benefit pension plans are $71 billion short of the amount needed to pay benefits to prospective retirees, Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. said Monday. Partly as a result of low interest rates and poor investment returns, the gap between what companies have in pension reserves and what they've promised in retirement benefits widened nearly 34% in 1993 from 1992, government officials said. Roughly 8 million workers are at risk--and about 1.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | From the Washington Post
Sen. Bob Kerrey (D-Neb.) chose the course of prudence Sunday and announced he will run for reelection in 2000, rather than challenge Vice President Al Gore for the Democratic presidential nomination. The decision, disclosed at a news conference here after a weekend of closed-door discussions with supporters from Nebraska and around the nation, disappointed but did not surprise many of the hundreds who met with Kerrey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1997
Among the eye-opening statistics last week in a Times series on campaign contributions by American business is the disclosure that corporate giving in the last election amounted to only 6% of the total $2 billion donated. Moreover, many of the nation's biggest and most successful firms were relative pikers when it came to shelling out money to the pols. Of the 544 companies surveyed, more than 100 reported no contributions at all.
SPORTS
January 12, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
Patriotic fever spread to Ted Kennedy, who presented a Drew Bledsoe model, No. 11 New England jersey to outgoing Secretary of Labor Robert B. Reich. The Massachusetts senator called Reich "the first-string quarterback on every labor issue." * Also wearing a Bledsoe jersey was 9-year-old Christopher Barry of Hopkinton, Mass., when his mother told him Friday night that "the most unbelievable thing" had happened. . . . Christopher would take part in today's pregame coin toss.
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