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November 26, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central American presidents will carry the divisive issue of immigration to next month's Summit of the Americas in Miami, where they plan to tell President Clinton that only improved economies can stanch the northward flow of illegal immigrants.
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NEWS
November 26, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central American presidents will carry the divisive issue of immigration to next month's Summit of the Americas in Miami, where they plan to tell President Clinton that only improved economies can stanch the northward flow of illegal immigrants.
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OPINION
December 23, 2003
In "Free Trade Looks South" (editorial, Dec. 18) you applaud the completion of the U.S.-Central American Free Trade Agreement. But CAFTA is neither free trade nor fair trade and is a recipe for disaster in Central America. When the U.S. forces another country to lift barriers to trade while maintaining high levels of subsidies for agribusiness at home, it is not free trade. And when more than a million small farmers are pushed off the land (as occurred in Mexico following the North American Free Trade Agreement)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1992 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
Really big decisions about the nation's economic destiny are considered much too important to run the risk of any popular, democratic input. When you see the word bipartisan, know that the fix is in and democracy out of the loop. Take monetary policy. In the first presidential debate, Sander Vanocur asked Bill Clinton how he proposed to deal with the chairman of the Federal Reserve, a man with more power over the economy than the President, yet accountable to no one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992 | ANDREW LePAGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly 500 people, including garment workers, labor and environmental leaders, joined Thursday at the U.S.-Mexico border to protest the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement. Chanting "$4 a day, no way!" the demonstration against the trade agreement was one of the largest thus far in San Diego County, which analysts say will feel an immediate impact from the agreement.
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