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NEWS
December 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian deputies moved to scrap labor laws brought in 30 years ago when the Soviet state was boss, backing a new code that allows private firms to hire and fire workers. The new labor code is also designed to boost job security, locking in workers' rights, penalizing employers over delays in paying wages and providing a higher minimum wage. It provides for a 40-hour workweek and enshrines the right to paid leave after six months' employment instead of the current 11 months.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
After almost a year of contentious proceedings, the owner of the Hawaiian Gardens Casino will go before a state licensing board today to ask for a permanent gambling license. Dr. Irving I. Moskowitz, a multimillionaire hospital owner who now resides in Florida, has gained international attention for funneling millions of dollars to pay for Jewish settlements on land in Arab neighborhoods of Jerusalem and in parts of the West Bank.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1989
A task force of vice officers from the Los Angeles Police Department and investigators from the California Labor Board and state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has closed six Pacoima bars over wage and labor code violations. The undercover crackdown, which took place from 8 p.m. Friday to 1 a.m. Saturday, was part of an ongoing police effort to curb drunk driving in the Pacoima area, Sgt. William Thomas said.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian deputies moved to scrap labor laws brought in 30 years ago when the Soviet state was boss, backing a new code that allows private firms to hire and fire workers. The new labor code is also designed to boost job security, locking in workers' rights, penalizing employers over delays in paying wages and providing a higher minimum wage. It provides for a 40-hour workweek and enshrines the right to paid leave after six months' employment instead of the current 11 months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities on Thursday charged Kaiser International Corp. of San Pedro with causing the death of a dockworker last year by violating six state workplace safety regulations. The criminal charges, filed by city and county prosecutors, came almost a year to the day after longshoreman Jimmie Garcia Magallanez, who had worked on the docks for 35 years, was struck and killed by a railroad boxcar at Kaiser's coal-loading facility. Kaiser has denied any negligence in the case.
NEWS
July 4, 1985
Panama's main labor federation, after an all-night bargaining session, called off a two-day-old strike that had threatened to halt shipping traffic through the Panama Canal. The government reportedly agreed not to call the legislature into special session to vote on proposed changes in the 14-year-old labor code to eliminate featherbedding. The code is viewed by many as an obstacle to sorely needed foreign investment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1986 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A Municipal Court jury in Santa Ana on Tuesday convicted a Buena Park contractor and his firm of willfully violating the state labor code when a construction worker was crushed to death on one of their projects. Ray Booth, acting district manager of the state Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal-OSHA), which investigated the 1984 accident, called the verdict precedent-setting. The decision should make local contractors "sit up and take notice," he said.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1991
I am a claims adjuster who handles workers' compensation claims. The state's workers' compensation laws, even after the reform, have created and perpetuated a system where applicant attorneys can make money on any case no matter how fraudulent and where doctors for both sides say what they are paid to say rather than what they think. An employer can almost count on paying out $9,000 to settle a stress claim after firing an employee who wasn't doing his or her job. The sad part is that only a third of that money goes to the employee, and the rest goes to his attorney, his attorney's psychiatrist and internist, the insurance company's psychiatrist and internist and the insurance company's attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Metro Rail tunnel quality control inspector, who blew the whistle on construction flaws and later triggered an FBI investigation, has been awarded $1.38 million by a Superior Court jury in a lawsuit against his former employer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1986 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
A Buena Park contracting company and its owner, convicted in July of willfully violating the state labor code and causing the death of a construction worker who was crushed under a huge concrete slab, were given probation and fined $25,000 each by an Orange County Municipal Court judge Thursday. Donald W. Frank and his firm, Donlan Corp., had been convicted on four misdemeanor counts of violating the California administrative and labor code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998 | SUSAN ABRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 15, Juan Garcia worked eight hours a day, six days a week, repairing beat-up cars in an auto body shop near his South-Central home to earn food money for his family. For two months, he sanded off old paint and prepared cars for coating with only a paper mask on his face to protect his nose and mouth from the fumes. He earned $100 a week, not knowing why he suffered from headaches, or that he may have been overworked and underpaid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office Friday charged an employee of the prime contractor on Los Angeles' Metro Rail subway project with state labor code violations in connection with last year's death of a worker on the multibillion-dollar construction job. In an action said to be unrelated to a county grand jury probe of the subway, the district attorney filed a misdemeanor complaint against Robert Carlysle Anderson, 59, of North Hollywood.
OPINION
December 21, 1997 | Sandra Hernandez
When Jose Millan was named California's labor commissioner in July, he took over an agency plagued with problems. The department's record of handling workers' wage claims was dismal, and it faced criticism from leaders of various ethnic communities for neglecting the state's growing class of immigrant workers. Low morale among the agency's employees, who complained of a growing workload and fewer resources, was also an issue.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Mattel Inc. on Thursday established a code of conduct for its suppliers and contractors prohibiting the use of child labor and the breaking of minimum wage laws. The El Segundo-based maker of Barbie dolls and other best-selling toys said the code doesn't allow its plants or contractors to hire workers under the age of 16 or to use forced labor or prison labor. Mattel said it will terminate suppliers that fail to meet the standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities on Thursday charged Kaiser International Corp. of San Pedro with causing the death of a dockworker last year by violating six state workplace safety regulations. The criminal charges, filed by city and county prosecutors, came almost a year to the day after longshoreman Jimmie Garcia Magallanez, who had worked on the docks for 35 years, was struck and killed by a railroad boxcar at Kaiser's coal-loading facility. Kaiser has denied any negligence in the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following a weekend raid that drew some cheers from neighbors, state and local authorities are considering a host of charges against the owner and employees of the Showgirls nightclub, including allegations of lewd conduct and liquor law violations. The dozen or so city, county and state officials who swooped into the Reseda Boulevard nightclub last weekend found a number of illegal activities at the bar, authorities said. The bar was closed down Friday night, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998 | SUSAN ABRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 15, Juan Garcia worked eight hours a day, six days a week, repairing beat-up cars in an auto body shop near his South-Central home to earn food money for his family. For two months, he sanded off old paint and prepared cars for coating with only a paper mask on his face to protect his nose and mouth from the fumes. He earned $100 a week, not knowing why he suffered from headaches, or that he may have been overworked and underpaid.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Mattel Inc. on Thursday established a code of conduct for its suppliers and contractors prohibiting the use of child labor and the breaking of minimum wage laws. The El Segundo-based maker of Barbie dolls and other best-selling toys said the code doesn't allow its plants or contractors to hire workers under the age of 16 or to use forced labor or prison labor. Mattel said it will terminate suppliers that fail to meet the standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Metro Rail tunnel quality control inspector, who blew the whistle on construction flaws and later triggered an FBI investigation, has been awarded $1.38 million by a Superior Court jury in a lawsuit against his former employer.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1991
I am a claims adjuster who handles workers' compensation claims. The state's workers' compensation laws, even after the reform, have created and perpetuated a system where applicant attorneys can make money on any case no matter how fraudulent and where doctors for both sides say what they are paid to say rather than what they think. An employer can almost count on paying out $9,000 to settle a stress claim after firing an employee who wasn't doing his or her job. The sad part is that only a third of that money goes to the employee, and the rest goes to his attorney, his attorney's psychiatrist and internist, the insurance company's psychiatrist and internist and the insurance company's attorney.
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