Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLabor Code Violations
IN THE NEWS

Labor Code Violations

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1989
A task force of vice officers from the Los Angeles Police Department and investigators from the California Labor Board and state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has closed six Pacoima bars over wage and labor code violations. The undercover crackdown, which took place from 8 p.m. Friday to 1 a.m. Saturday, was part of an ongoing police effort to curb drunk driving in the Pacoima area, Sgt. William Thomas said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2009 | Patrick J. McDonnell
Pablo Nuñez, a carpenter by trade, says he is accustomed to working 10-hour shifts, sometimes six days a week, on home-building sites throughout Southern California. But legally mandated overtime pay was almost as unheard of at job sites, he says, as visits from labor inspectors. "The only person getting overtime might be the brother of the foreman," Nuñez said. The Corona resident is among 85 residential construction workers from California, Nevada and Arizona who will share $242,301 in unpaid wages after settling a federal lawsuit last month against a major home-builder, Boise, Idaho-based Building Materials Holding Corp.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office Friday charged an employee of the prime contractor on Los Angeles' Metro Rail subway project with state labor code violations in connection with last year's death of a worker on the multibillion-dollar construction job. In an action said to be unrelated to a county grand jury probe of the subway, the district attorney filed a misdemeanor complaint against Robert Carlysle Anderson, 59, of North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2009 | Evelyn Larrubia
Los Angeles City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo filed criminal charges against the owners and a manager of four Los Angeles carwashes, accusing them of failure to pay proper wages or allow breaks. Delgadillo also charged the manager with brandishing a club and machete to threaten workers attempting to organize a union. Owners Benny and Nissan Pirian and manager Manuel Reyes were charged with 172 counts of violating criminal and labor laws for their treatment of workers at Hollywood Five Star Car Wash in Northridge, Vermont Hand Wash in Los Feliz and Celebrity Car Wash and Hollywood Car Wash in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following a weekend raid that drew some cheers from neighbors, state and local authorities are considering a host of charges against the owner and employees of the Showgirls nightclub, including allegations of lewd conduct and liquor law violations. The dozen or so city, county and state officials who swooped into the Reseda Boulevard nightclub last weekend found a number of illegal activities at the bar, authorities said. The bar was closed down Friday night, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1990
At a rally in Los Angeles, union and Democratic Party proponents of a bill to crack down on labor code violations in the garment industry Friday called on Gov. George Deukmejian to sign the legislation. A bill by Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica) would make garment manufacturers liable for underpaid wages, unsafe working conditions or other labor violations committed by sewing subcontractors who are hired by manufacturers. Deukmejian has until Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989
Defense attorneys for nine companies charged in last year's fatal fire at the First Interstate Bank building said Wednesday they will try to get the case dismissed before an arraignment can be scheduled. The defense lawyers said they will argue next month that the actions prosecutors accuse their clients of committing do not constitute a crime. The lawyers appeared in Municipal Court on Wednesday for arraignment in the case but obtained a postponement at least until after they argue their dismissal motion July 26. The nine companies, including First Interstate Bank of California, were charged with 12 misdemeanors last month in connection with the May 4, 1988, fire at the bank building in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1993
The owners of an Antelope Valley fast-food chain face criminal charges for violation of state workers' compensation laws in two counties. The local Los Angeles County district attorney's office filed two misdemeanor charges Friday against Taco Tec owners Armando Sanchez, Estrella Sanchez and Pat Stewart for failing to provide workers' comp insurance for employees at two restaurants in Lancaster. An arraignment is set for June 25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities on Thursday charged Kaiser International Corp. of San Pedro with causing the death of a dockworker last year by violating six state workplace safety regulations. The criminal charges, filed by city and county prosecutors, came almost a year to the day after longshoreman Jimmie Garcia Magallanez, who had worked on the docks for 35 years, was struck and killed by a railroad boxcar at Kaiser's coal-loading facility. Kaiser has denied any negligence in the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A popular Antelope Valley-based Mexican fast-food restaurant chain is under investigation for alleged state labor code violations and for county health and false advertising problems, state and county officials said Wednesday. State labor officials said they are investigating Taco Tec Inc.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A kosher meatpacking plant that was the site of one of the nation's largest immigration raids was fined nearly $10 million over accusations that it violated state labor laws. Iowa Labor Commissioner Dave Neil assessed the civil penalties against Agriprocessors in Postville for what he called repeated violations of wage laws from January 2006 to June 2008. The fines are the latest trouble for Agriprocessors since the raid in which 389 people were arrested. In September, the plant owner and managers were charged with 9,311 misdemeanors alleging they illegally hired minors and let children younger than 16 handle dangerous equipment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
For two decades, Ziba Beauty salons have brought the ancient Indian techniques of eyebrow threading and henna tattoos to a clientele that has included Madonna, Gwen Stefani, Salma Hayek and Naomi Campbell. Ziba Chief Executive Sumita Batra, 39, and her staff have styled models for Vanity Fair and Rolling Stone magazines and TV shows "America's Next Top Model" and "Extreme Makeover."
BUSINESS
June 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s hourly employees in Delaware, South Dakota, Nevada and Alaska can't pursue group lawsuits claiming that the company denied rest breaks and manipulated timecards to "shave" their pay, a judge ruled. The workers, whose suits were combined in federal court in Las Vegas, failed to prove that common issues predominated, ruling out class-action treatment, U.S. District Judge Philip Pro said. The lawsuits were among 35 combined in federal court alleging that Wal-Mart, based in Bentonville, Ark., violated wage and hour laws.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
State officials are shutting down a San Joaquin Valley farm labor contractor that hired a pregnant teen who died while pruning grapes last month. Authorities suspect 17-year-old Maria Isabel Vasquez Jimenez died because Merced Farm Labor denied her proper access to shade and water even as she worked in 100-degree heat. The California Department of Industrial Relations issued the stop-work order Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2008 | Sam Quinones
State labor inspectors shut down five downtown wooden-pallet manufacturers Tuesday, citing them for numerous wage and safety violations. The manufacturers, often set up on vacant lots, were operating without workers' compensation insurance, said Bob Jones, deputy secretary of the state Labor and Workforce Development Agency. Manufacturers also were paying in cash at levels well below the minimum wage and with no overtime, Jones said. In the worst example, Sonora Pallets on East 10th Street was found to be paying seven employees $350 each for a six-day workweek, at 12 hours a day, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2008 | Sonia Nazario, Times Staff Writer
"Companero, how do they treat you here?" The stranger addressed Manuel Varela, a worker at Nary's Hand Car Wash on Beverly Boulevard, in Spanish. "Badly," Varela answered, continuing to pass tickets to motorists as they pulled in. Curious, Gabriel Chavez crawled out of the car he was vacuuming. Keeping his gaze on the small window that the owner used to peer at his workers, he stepped toward the visitor, out of his boss' sightline. "Do you know you have rights?" the stranger asked Chavez.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the grandstands and opulent turf clubs, workers who take care of horses at California's racetracks inhabit a dusty, isolated world where normal labor and living standards don't apply. They often work every day of the week without overtime. Most live in small equipment rooms in the stables, with plywood walls, bare concrete floors and no running water. In Pomona, they sleep and cook on county property under Fire Department signs warning: "Use as Living Quarters and Cooking Prohibited."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
State labor investigators closed a downtown Los Angeles garment factory where 100 Thai immigrants were believed working for below-minimum wages and, in some cases, living on the premises, officials said Wednesday. The factory, operating without a name at 2407 S. Grand Ave., was producing garments with J.C. Penney labels, officials said. Investigators said Penney contracted with a downtown sportswear manufacturer, Monarch Knit and Sportswear.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2008 | Martin Zimmerman and Victoria Kim, Times Staff Writers
A judge has ruled that the Santa Barbara News-Press committed flagrant violations of federal labor laws when it fired eight journalists for engaging in union activities, and he ordered that the newspaper rehire the former employees. Evidence presented during a 17-day hearing last summer shows "the News-Press' widespread, general disregard for the fundamental rights of the employees," Administrative Law Judge William G. Kocol wrote in a 75-page decision issued last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2007 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Department of Labor is investigating whether the company that employs workers who process immigration and citizenship applications in Orange County violated federal regulations by cutting their pay under a new contract that begins next week.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|