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Labor Code Violations

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The upscale Renee Strauss for the Bride salon in Beverly Hills doesn't conform to anyone's definition of a sweatshop. Its Web site boasts an exclusive clientele of Hollywood luminaries, including Raquel Welch, Victoria Principal and Roseanne. Its wedding and bridesmaid gowns have appeared on shows such as "ER," "Beverly Hills 90210" and "Melrose Place."
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2001 | Marla Dickerson
Commerce-based XOXO Clothing Co. has agreed to pay $17,433 in back wages owed to 23 garment workers by a defunct contractor. A Labor Department investigation found that Martinez & Sons Sportswear, a Los Angeles contractor that sewed apparel for the popular young women's clothing label, failed to pay wages for work performed from July through September. Under federal law, garment manufacturers are responsible for ensuring that their contractors' employees are properly paid.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001 | Daryl Strickland
Three former employees of DiTech Funding Corp. sued the Costa Mesa mortgage lender and its parent company, alleging that they were forced to work overtime without pay. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, seeks back pay for all loan agents who worked in DiTech's office for the last four years. The suit, which also names DiTech parent GMAC Mortgage Corp., also requests one hour of pay for each day employees failed to receive adequate meal breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time labor inspectors looked at working conditions in the stables of several California racetracks, they reported finding widespread abuse of minimum wage and overtime laws. But just as they prepared to expand their investigation statewide, their agency's top brass ordered them to stop the probe. That was 15 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2000 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Koreatown labor advocacy group released a survey Wednesday, alleging that neighborhood restaurant owners routinely violate minimum-wage laws and other legal safeguards for the approximately 2,000 workers who prepare food, serve, wash dishes and clean at hundreds of eating establishments.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Nicaraguan garment factory that supplies discounted clothing to American soldiers imposes sweatshop conditions and starvation wages on its workers, a lawsuit filed Tuesday contends. The lawsuit, filed by labor rights attorneys in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, seeks punitive damages against the Chentex factory and its Taiwan-based parent, Nien Hsing. It contends that Nien Hsing pays workers less than 20 cents for each pair of blue jeans sewn.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve Los Angeles garment workers are suing XOXO Clothing Co. for back wages and damages, claiming a contractor hired by XOXO to sew apparel for the popular young women's clothing label stiffed them for six weeks' wages. The suit filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles claims Commerce-based XOXO has repeatedly violated federal labor standards by hiring contractors who flout wage-and-hour laws.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The owner and manager of a floor polish factory that exploded, killing 11 workers, have been arrested on suspicion that they locked the employees in the factory, police said. The pair could face murder and other charges, a police spokesman said. A fire broke out in the small brick building in Lenasia late Friday, causing an explosion when it spread to gas containers.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
China will sentence a U.S.-based Falun Gong member on charges of "spying for a foreign organization" this week, the Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said. Teng Chunyan, 37, was arrested in March after gathering information on China's persecution of members of the banned spiritual movement, the center said, adding that she could be sentenced to 10 years or more.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
China allowed U.S. Customs agents to inspect a factory suspected of using prisoners to make goods for export, the first such visit permitted in three years, diplomats said Tuesday. The U.S. Embassy declined comment on Friday's inspection, but a Western diplomat who spoke on condition of anonymity said inspectors who visited the Dezhou Machine Works factory in eastern Shandong province found no sign that U.S.-bound exports were being made there. U.S.
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