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Labor Code Violations

NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The owner and manager of a floor polish factory that exploded, killing 11 workers, have been arrested on suspicion that they locked the employees in the factory, police said. The pair could face murder and other charges, a police spokesman said. A fire broke out in the small brick building in Lenasia late Friday, causing an explosion when it spread to gas containers.
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NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
China will sentence a U.S.-based Falun Gong member on charges of "spying for a foreign organization" this week, the Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said. Teng Chunyan, 37, was arrested in March after gathering information on China's persecution of members of the banned spiritual movement, the center said, adding that she could be sentenced to 10 years or more.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
China allowed U.S. Customs agents to inspect a factory suspected of using prisoners to make goods for export, the first such visit permitted in three years, diplomats said Tuesday. The U.S. Embassy declined comment on Friday's inspection, but a Western diplomat who spoke on condition of anonymity said inspectors who visited the Dezhou Machine Works factory in eastern Shandong province found no sign that U.S.-bound exports were being made there. U.S.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A measure aimed at cleaning up labor and living conditions at California's horse-racing tracks passed the Legislature on Thursday--a day after labor inspectors looking for such problems say they were rebuffed at a track two miles from the state Capitol. The bill (AB 2760) passed the Assembly on Thursday, 56 to 6, after having cleared the Senate on Wednesday, 38 to 1. It now heads to the governor's desk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California labor authorities say some key thoroughbred trainers are thwarting an ongoing investigation into possible overtime and minimum wage violations at California's racetracks by collectively refusing to turn over payroll records. Labor inspectors this summer launched surprise sweeps in the stable areas of five major racetracks, including one at Del Mar in San Diego County last week, to see if low-wage workers who take care of the racehorses are getting paid properly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reversing field, the horse racing industry is mounting an attack against legislation to clean up poor labor and housing conditions for workers who take care of racehorses throughout California. After initially expressing support for some of the bill's provisions, the often fractious groups that make up the billion-dollar industry have united and begun lobbying against an Assembly bill scheduled to be heard in the Senate Appropriations Committee today.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His name is Guadalupe Flores, and he works the midnight shift seven nights a week, stripping, waxing and buffing the floors of an upscale Fullerton supermarket. He says he earns far less than the minimum wage, and just laughs when asked about overtime pay for his 56-hour weeks. Strong chemicals make his nose bleed, burn his fingers and eat the soles of his cheap sneakers. He operates powerful, potentially dangerous machines but isn't protected by workers' compensation insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweeping legislation that would regulate the living and working conditions at California's horse racing tracks passed the key state Senate Governmental Organization Committee on Tuesday. But although industry leaders have shown some support for the measure, they complain that, among other things, it would unfairly force horse trainers to form a collective bargaining group to negotiate with labor unions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000
State and federal labor authorities wrapped up their enforcement sweep of four California horse-racing tracks Thursday, issuing fines as inspectors continued to find significant violations of overtime, minimum wage and record-keeping laws. The two-day action is the first aimed at labor conditions at tracks since the mid-1980s, when inspectors were called off a similar action by their top brass, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State labor authorities launched surprise sweeps of the stable areas at four California horse racetracks Wednesday and found widespread instances of workers being paid in cash and denied proper overtime compensation, officials said. The enforcement action--historically targeted at the garment, agricultural and restaurant industries--is the first aimed at labor conditions at the tracks in more than a decade. Inspectors from the state labor commissioner's office as well as the U.S.
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