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Labor Employment Training Corp

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BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | TOM FURLONG and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the aerospace industry in Southern California shrinks dramatically, the divisions in the United Auto Workers over how to answer the challenge only get uglier and deeper. UAW Local 148, which represents more than 19,000 Douglas Aircraft workers in Long Beach, is seeking to oust the union's regional director, Bruce Lee, from current contract talks. The local alleges that Lee has a conflict of interest that has hurt union efforts to stem the exodus of aerospace jobs from the Southland.
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BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the General Motors plant in Van Nuys set to close this summer, a long-running feud between dissident United Auto Workers members at the plant and the union's regional director has moved to a new battleground: Van Nuys Superior Court. In a lawsuit filed there in February, Bruce Lee, head of the union's nine-state Western region, contends that eight members of the divided UAW local at Van Nuys recently published libelous statements about him. Lee is seeking $1 million in punitive damages.
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BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the General Motors plant in Van Nuys set to close this summer, a long-running feud between dissident United Auto Workers members at the plant and the union's regional director has moved to a new battleground: Van Nuys Superior Court. In a lawsuit filed there in February, Bruce Lee, head of the union's nine-state Western region, contends that eight members of the divided UAW local at Van Nuys recently published libelous statements about him. Lee is seeking $1 million in punitive damages.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | TOM FURLONG and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the aerospace industry in Southern California shrinks dramatically, the divisions in the United Auto Workers over how to answer the challenge only get uglier and deeper. UAW Local 148, which represents more than 19,000 Douglas Aircraft workers in Long Beach, is seeking to oust the union's regional director, Bruce Lee, from current contract talks. The local alleges that Lee has a conflict of interest that has hurt union efforts to stem the exodus of aerospace jobs from the Southland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER HEREDIA
A job training center geared toward lessening the blow of hundreds of layoffs at Abex Aerospace will open Wednesday in Oxnard. The Career Resource Center, at 3481 W. 5th St., Suite 100, will offer job counseling, information on resume preparation and telephones that can be used by job-seekers. Although organizers said the center is being opened in the wake of layoffs by Abex Aerospace in Oxnard, it will provide job training to any Ventura County resident.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A statewide job-training organization affiliated with the United Auto Workers union is being sued by an Orange County subcontractor for allegedly accepting state employment-training money and then deliberately placing ineligible job trainees in the program. In a lawsuit filed this week in Orange County Superior Court, Rands Systems Inc. alleges that the union affiliate, UAW-Labor Employment and Training Corp. in Bell, failed to pay Rands at least $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
To Steve Ortega, the decision by Abex Aerospace to close its Oxnard plant and lay off 500 employees last October meant the end of a way of life he thought would last his lifetime. Instead of the comfortable living they had with wages from Oxnard's largest employer, Ortega, 42, and his wife, Charis, suddenly had to scrimp to pay bills and provide for their three children. Soon, their money ran out, they lost their home and declared bankruptcy, Ortega said.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1994 | From a Times staff writer
Rands Systems Inc., an Orange County job-training firm, has filed a second lawsuit against the UAW-Labor Employment and Training Corp., a nonprofit statewide organization that counsels, trains and helps people find jobs.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN
CITY COUNCIL * REWARD OFFERED: Approved a $25,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the slaying of Willie Lee Smith Jr., who was killed Sept. 12 when he was chased into the intersection of 54th Street and Wilton Place and shot. Two police officers witnessed the shooting, but the suspect fired at them and escaped. * LATINO MEDAL OF HONOR WINNERS: Approved the use of $250 from the city's general fund to assist the Eugene A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1991
A Los Angeles city-sponsored job training center for unemployed aerospace and defense industry workers opened Thursday, offering free counseling and job referrals. The center, the first in the San Fernando Valley, was established at West Valley Community Center in Van Nuys to ease the economic pain of closures and layoffs in industries hit by budget cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1989
The city will be managing a new federal program to help local workers who have been notified they will be laid off because of work-force reductions or plant closures. The City Council voted unanimously this week to approve a list of agencies that will counsel workers about to be laid off on how to write resumes, handle interview techniques and search for new jobs. The program is part of the federal Plant Closure Act approved by Congress last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1988
A new job recruitment center has opened in South-Central Los Angeles amid fanfare from city officials and community leaders, who say it will bring employment opportunities to an area where the unemployment rate among young black men is reportedly more than 40%. The center is run by the United Auto Workers-Labor Employment and Training Corp., a nonprofit organization that operates at several sites in Southern California, including a job training facility in South Gate.
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