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Labor Force

BUSINESS
August 22, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Financially troubled Pinnacle Micro Inc. fired 25% of its work force Thursday, citing weak sales of one of its major product lines and a corporate need to cut back its operating expenses. The company, which makes compact disk storage systems, laid off more than two dozen workers at its Irvine and Colorado Springs, Colo., offices. The company also named its founder, William F. Blum, as chairman and chief executive, partly to replace Daryl J. White, who resigned as chairman in June.
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BOOKS
March 12, 1995 | James Flanigan, Flanigan is a Times business columnist
It wasn't supposed to be this way. In "The Iceman Cometh," the anarchist character Hugo Kalmar cries out that once the revolution comes, "we will eat hot dogs and drink free beer beneath the willow trees." Well, the technological revolution has come. Everywhere, computers and other electronic machines are enhancing human capabilities, making work more productive and eliminating heavy lifting.
NEWS
March 19, 1991
As the 21st Century approaches and communism recedes, a new specter is haunting Europe: youth deficits. By the year 2000, demographers warn that 24 countries--in Europe, Asia and North America plus Australia--will experience a relative drop in the proportion of their populations aged 15 to 24, a segment of the population crucial for labor force replenishment and social stability. By 2010, five more will join their ranks, some of them developing nations with already critical economic problems.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The nation's unemployment rate dropped to a five-year low of 7.2% in September, the government reported Tuesday, but employers continued to show reluctance in hiring as they added a moderate 148,000 jobs over the month. The Labor Department report, delayed 2 1/2 weeks because of the partial federal government shutdown, reflected an economy growing at a lackluster rate. The latest job gains matched the pace since the start of summer but came in below Wall Street's forecast for an increase of about 175,000 jobs.
OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The Persian Gulf emirate of Qatar, flush with oil riches and seeking to push its way to the front of the international stage, is in the midst of an enormous, decade-long building boom to construct facilities and infrastructure for the 2022 World Cup soccer tournament, the largest and most-viewed sporting event in the world. Unfortunately, Qatar is preparing for that moment of international cooperation and sport by grievously exploiting its foreign workers, subjecting them to dangerous conditions that should be drawing forceful condemnations from the world community.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1988 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
Unemployment in Orange County fell to 3.3% in August from 3.5% in July, the state Employment Development Department reported Thursday. An unusual decline in the number of people in the labor force caused most of the drop in the unemployment rate. There were 14,600 fewer workers in the county's civilian labor force during August, the EDD estimated, or about 1.35 million people in all. Of those, 45,000 were unemployed.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1990 | From United Press International
An overwhelming majority of workers feel a responsibility to cut costs in the workplace, but most say the programs launched by bosses to do just that are not very effective, according to a survey released Thursday. The survey of workers by Brooks International of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., found that 86% of those interviewed felt a personal obligation to help keep costs as low as possible. And 64% said they felt they could make a significant contribution to cost-reduction efforts.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
California's pace of job creation slowed in April, as employers added 10,300 jobs in April, nevertheless pushing the state's unemployment rate down to 9% from 9.4% the month before. Employers had added twice as many jobs in March as they did in April. They slowed job creation in nearly every sector, including government, financial activities and trade, according to data released Friday morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics . It's possible that continued uncertainty in Washington, coupled with the effects of the sequester and an expiration of payroll tax cuts is keeping employers' expectations tempered, said Sung Won Sohn, an economist at Cal State Channel Islands.
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