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NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Don Lee
The second presidential debate began just as the first did - with a lot of statistics tossed out about jobs and unemployment. Two of them are worth some scrutiny. Mitt Romney said today's unemployment rate of 7.8% grossly understates what's really going on in the economy. Specifically, he said that if the government counted all the people who dropped out of the labor force, the real unemployment rate would be 10.7%. But Romney's figure assumes that the nation's labor-force population in the last few years had kept growing at the same rate as before the recession began in late 2007.
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BUSINESS
January 26, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Another sign that California's economic recovery is going slowly: The Golden State now boasts the second-highest unemployment rate in the nation. After months of ranking No. 3, California has swapped places with Michigan. California's 12.5% unemployment rate in December ranks only behind Nevada's 14.5% jobless rate, according to the latest rankings from the Bureau of Labor Statistics released Tuesday. Meanwhile, Michigan ended 2010 with a jobless rate of 11.7%. That's down from 14.5% in December 2009, when the industrial state was saddled with the worst unemployment in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
For three years, Triana Williams has searched for a job. Between caring for her elderly grandmother and raising her young sister, the 24-year-old has filled out application after application at Ralphs, Rite Aid, Whole Foods, Ross, Payless and Starbucks. She calls to follow up, but they wave her off, Williams said. "They tell me I need experience to get the job," Williams said in her Venice apartment. "But you have to get a job to get experience. " Teenagers and young adults are still mired in dire levels of unemployment in Los Angeles County, years after the recession officially ended.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
Working women take about one more sick day per year than men, the National Center for Health Statistics reported in a new study today. Women averaged 5.5 lost work days per year, compared to 4.3 missed days for men, in the analysis covering 1983 through 1985. John Gary Collins, one of the authors, declined to speculate on reasons for the difference, saying "there could be many possibilities." He said that comparative figures for men and women, which the National Center for Health Statistics had not collected before, were included in its new study because women now make up such a large portion of the work force.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
California's pace of job creation slowed in April, as employers added 10,300 jobs in April, nevertheless pushing the state's unemployment rate down to 9% from 9.4% the month before. Employers had added twice as many jobs in March as they did in April. They slowed job creation in nearly every sector, including government, financial activities and trade, according to data released Friday morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics . It's possible that continued uncertainty in Washington, coupled with the effects of the sequester and an expiration of payroll tax cuts is keeping employers' expectations tempered, said Sung Won Sohn, an economist at Cal State Channel Islands.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2012 | By Pat Benson
U.S. employers added 96,000 jobs in August, the Labor Department said Friday, much fewer than expected. The unemployment rate was revised down, to 8.1% from 8.3% in July, but that's because people dropped out of the labor force. Join us for a live discussion about the state of unemployment and the economy later Friday. The Times will host a Google+ Hangout at 10:30 a.m. PDT with economy reporter Don Lee, markets reporter Andrew Tangel and Business deputy editor Joe Bel Bruno.
NEWS
January 11, 2009 | Ellen Simon, Simon writes for the Associated Press.
The unemployment rate for December, 7.2%, is the number every TV newscaster, economic blogger and talk radio host focused on Friday. That rate, the highest in 16 years, translates into 11.1 million Americans without jobs. But 7.2%% doesn't capture how many people are out of work. By another measure -- from the same employment report -- as much as 13.5% of the labor force is either unemployed or underemployed. The 7.2 figure everyone knows measures something very specific: the portion of people in the work force who wanted to work, looked for a job last month, but weren't working during the first week in December.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
They're one of the most sought-after voting blocs, prevalent in swing states such as Ohio, but if today's job numbers are any indication, working-class voters could still be very much up for grabs in this election. That's because as the country's economy slowly improves, more people who traditionally work in manufacturing, logistics, or other professions that don't require a college degree are increasingly dropping out of the labor force and giving up looking for work. There were 11.7 million workers with less than a high school diploma in the labor force last September - now there are just 11.2 million, indicating that 500,000 people with less than a high school diploma have given up looking for jobs in a tough economy.
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